POC ZINE PROJECT

Posts tagged Feminism

Meet Cihuatl Ce: POCZP’s 2014 L.A. Zine Fest Tabler and Panelist (2 of 5)

POC Zine Project is tabling and hosting a panel discussion at the 2014 L.A. Zine Fest! Meet one of our five collaborators, Cihuatl Ce, founder of the Ovarian Psyco-Cycles Bicycle Brigade:

Cihuatl Ce (Founder, Ovarian Psyco-Cycles Bicycle Brigade in Los Angeles, CA)

[Photo credit: Steet Lenz Photography]

Cihuatl Ce (pronounced Seewhat Seh) has been spitting truth to power in the form of politically charged feminist inspired, urban indigenous hip-hop for the past decade.

Sharing the stage with underground hip hop heavies such as Dead Prez, Bambu, Broadcast Live, Olmeca, Invincible -to name a few- her high energy performances have won her dedicated support base across the globe. She currently tours in support of her latest album, FEMI9mm: The Fury of a Wombyn, released in early 2012.

POCZP NOTE: Cihuatl Ce will be doing a special live performance during our panel discussion at the 2014 L.A. Zine Fest! Stay tuned for more details.

Cihuatl’s reach is not confined solely to the lyrical realm of resistance. For the past 15 years she has been a fervent youth advocate and community organizer.

image

[Visit Cihuatl Ce at cihuatlce.comtwitter.com/CihuatlCe]

In 2010 she founded the first all womyn of color cycling collective Ovarian Psycos Bicycle Brigade and was the driving force behind landmark events such as LA’s first ever Clitoral Mass -attended by close to 300 womyn - as well as other initial rides addressing  the health disparities specific to womyn of color and at risk communities.

As a mother driven to reach young women with a message of hope, rebellion, and defiance against relics of tradition and patriarchy, Cihuatl Ce is committed to bringing consciousness beyond just the music, unapologetically creating change and leaving fans and casualties in her wake.

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BACKGROUND

POC Zine Project tabled at the 2013 L.A. Zine Fest and had a lot of fun. Read the recap here.

As part of our advocacy to support as many POC creators as possible, we’ve partnered with both new and past folks on this year’s events. POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano put out a call for new tabling and speaking partners for the 2014 L.A. Zine Fest, which resulted in our latest lineup. 

Cihuatl Ce hosted some 2013 #RaceRiotTour members during our California dates, which led to this latest collaboration.

MEET ALL OUR COLLABORATORS

Cihuatl Ce (Founder, Ovarian Psyco-Cycles Bicycle Brigade in Los Angeles, CA)

Ara Christina Jo (Rock Paper Scissors Collective in Oakland, CA)

Dail Chambers (Founder, Yeyo Arts collective in St. Louis, MO)

Nyky Gomez (Founder, Brown Recluse Zine Distro in Seattle, WA)

Tracey Brown (Community Organizer in New Orleans)

ABOUT 2014 L.A. ZINE FEST

L.A. Zine Fest is organized by a collective of zine-enthusiasts dedicated to promoting zine culture as a means to connect the pre-exisiting communities in L.A.–artistic or otherwise. They aim to create opportunities for people to share self-published works and host events that encourage ideas to spill out onto paper in pictures and words. They believe that by embracing the urge to create and sharing ideas there can be a more robust and formidable local zine community that extends beyond bookstores and bedrooms. L.A. Zine Fest is an opportunity for Southern California’s zinesters to come together en masse in order to meet and exchange ideas with those from all over the country.

Join us this year on February 16, 2014, when LAZF welcomes 175+ exhibitors of zines and small press publications to Helms Bakery as zinesters, comics creators and DIY publishers to come together to share their work with each other and with the public at large.

Helms Bakery District Parking Garage
(between La Dijonaise and Vitra)
8703 Washington Blvd.
Culver City, CA 90232

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2014. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to ongoing advocacy costs, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

We are rebooting our org structure and operations in 2014 and will be transparent about that process. Stay tuned.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

Just some sweet and simple anon love: thank you for existing. — Asked by Anonymous

Hi Anon,

Thanks so much for the love. We have been busy! In 2013 (among other initiatives) POCZP led multiple free workshops across the country, presented at Allied Media Conference, Chicago Zine Fest and L.A. Zine Fest to share knowledge, tabled at multiple zine fests in solidarity with local POC, curated & wrote a list of 50 zines by QTPOC, organized & executed a national #RaceRiotTour traveling community experiment, coordinated a massive donation of zines by POC to multiple libraries, continued our Legacy Series work to share influential materiality by POC, provided mini-grants to 20 creators of color, and worked with over 50 volunteers across the country - all as a volunteer entity.

As the recipient of this year’s Long Arm Stapler Award and with our name being dropped in mainstream publications (thanks, Kathleen Hanna!), we are doing our best to graciously navigate public recognition.

Endorsements are great, but what we really need is the resources to be able to continue our important work in 2014 and beyond as a grassroots nonprofit. We consider our work important because we exist to empower people of color to share their stories and to build community. 

We also collaborate with - and disrupt - academic spaces with the intention of being a third space resource.

If you are reading this and believe in POCZP, please donate what you can so that we can continue operations. We aren’t supported by a fiscal sponsor and don’t have an operating budget, and yet we were about to achieve so much this year because we are people-powered. We defy limitations by daring to believe in community.

But we need your help — now more than ever. If you would like to be a part of POCZP’s restructuring phase in 2014, email poczineproject@gmail.com. Help us create a sustainable funding model and access resources.

Please reblog this post and share the donation link with friends. Thank you <3

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

P.S. We are nothing without you, so thank YOU for existing.

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2014. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to ongoing advocacy costs, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

We are rebooted our org structure in 2014 and will be transparent about that process. Stay tuned.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

brassinpocket-booklyn:

Curators Aimee Lusty and Kate Wadkins seek submissions for a feminist art zine to be released at the close of BRASS IN POCKET, a group show opening Friday, September 13, 2013 at Booklyn Artists Alliance. For more info, click here.BRASS IN POCKET opens tonight at Booklyn Artists Alliance art gallery.

POCZP ally Kate Wadkins shared this call! &lt;3

brassinpocket-booklyn:

Curators Aimee Lusty and Kate Wadkins seek submissions for a feminist art zine to be released at the close of BRASS IN POCKET, a group show opening Friday, September 13, 2013 at Booklyn Artists Alliance. For more info, click here.

BRASS IN POCKET opens tonight at Booklyn Artists Alliance art gallery.

POCZP ally Kate Wadkins shared this call! <3

COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT: Meet POCZP’s 2013 #RACERIOTTOUR Driver Tracey Brown <3

Community,

We shared the mistakes we made during last year’s #raceriottour (view prezi) so that we would set a new standard for this year’s tour. In response to feedback, POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano prioritized Native/Indigenous Solidarity, self-care and caregiving for this year’s tour planning process.

Mainstream artists tour with their own wellness teams. People who plan corporate-sponsored tours understand the importance of having such a team in place. Tracey Brown is one of several #RaceRiotTour support team members we’ll be announcing in the coming days …

POCZP'S 2013 #RACERIOTTOUR DRIVER TRACEY BROWN 1 of 2

[DESCRIPTION: Tracey Brown. Photo credit: Tracey Brown]

ABOUT TRACEY BROWN, 2013 #RACERIOTTOUR DRIVER & MEDIATION SUPPORT

Tracey’s role on the #raceriottour is critical. In partnership with POCZP founder Daniela, Tracey is managing travel logistics/vehicle operations through our journey to 20 cities across the US. She will be the dedicated tour driver for the duration of the entire tour (with routine breaks from the POCZP support team).

Tracey will also provide (along with others on tour) mediation support as conflicts arise (they do! and it’s OK). 

POCZP founder Daniela met Tracey at the 2012 Anarchist People of Color convergence in New Orleans and was impressed with her organizational skills and her coalition building with the Ovarian Psyco-Cycles. This is the origin of the collaboration.

Without Tracey’s support coordinating rental logistics, this tour would not be happening.

Tracey, in her own words:

Born and raised in New Orleans, LA, Tracey is a community organizer
and survivor. With her love for the New Orleans POC community guiding her, she graduated from University of Hawaii at Manoa in 2009 with a dual degree in Psychology and American Studies.

Upon returning to her hometown, she became involved in various social justice endeavors such as bike accessibility, food justice, anti-racism work, housing justice, and anything else she could get involved in and help create accountability to and visibility of the local POC community. Among these undertakings was the collective organization of the 2012 Anarchist People of Color convergence in New Orleans.

Tracey currently works at the New Orleans Food Co-op while she
prepares to apply to graduate school in order to obtain her Master’s
degree in Community and Clinical Psychology. She also works with NOLA to Angola, an anti-PIC organization that provides a long-distance, solidarity bike ride to raise funds for the Cornerstone Builders’ Bus Project, the only bus service that provides free monthly rides to low-income families who have loved ones in one of the five Louisiana detention facilities. 

Tracey intends to use her experience organizing with various groups and her time with POCZP to create accountable, accessible, multidimensional community building, and POC driven community mental and spiritual health healing.

We’re so excited to collaborate with you, Tracey! <3 - POCZP

POCZP'S 2013 #RACERIOTTOUR DRIVER TRACEY BROWN 2 of 2

[DESCRIPTION: Tracey Brown. Photo credit: Tracey Brown]

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We will be sharing the full #raceriottour lineup of cities and dates on September 1, 2013, and will be rolling out more tour member announcements in the coming days.

Thanks for your patience! We are a 100% volunteer entity and are producing a national tour in our spare time.

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goals for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

Hey POC Zine Project! We at the Feminist Press love your organization’s blog, and we were hoping you would check ours out. We’re an independent nonprofit dedicated to publishing literature that promotes feminism, activism, and social justice. We’ll be posting book reviews, the latest in gender and sexuality issues, and other exciting news on our Tumblr. Perhaps you could help support us and spread the word to your followers, maybe join in on our discussions? We’d appreciate it! — Asked by thefeministpress

Dear Feminist Press and other entities that are reaching out to us right now solely to help them with things:

Thanks for your message. We appreciate your kind words. As you may have noticed from following our Tumblr (and through info we have shared here), we are in the middle of booking a 20 city tour. We are a 100% DIY, volunteer, unfunded project. As you can imagine, a 20 city tour is a tall order to deliver on when you factor in regular life needs (day job, family, etc.). We need all the help we can get.

With that context, we offer you the following friendly advice/guidance:

1. If it’s your first time reaching out to us, please consider figuring out in advance what sort of support you can offer in return, before asking us to take on additional tasks to further your mission. 

2. We are not a promotional mechanism for publishers. We are a grassroots advocacy platform for POC and deeply consider everything we help signal boost (intention, history of person/org, etc.). If you would like to develop a content sharing partnership, then you must also share what you can provide us in return.

3. If we have never seen you promote our efforts on your digital platforms, why should we consider adding additional tasks in the middle of booking our tour to support you? For example, Feminist Press has not re-blogged or promoted anything from POCZP on their Tumblr for over a week now (that’s as far back as we went to check), but yet contacted us on Tumblr asking for promotion … on our Tumblr. Does that make sense in terms of building goodwill/coalition building? No, it does not.

4. Please consider your various privileges before assuming that we have the space, time and emotional bandwidth to help you with your promotional efforts - especially without offering any support in return.

If you’d like to continue to discuss this (and have considered ways to offer us support so this is a mutually beneficial arrangement), please email poczineproject@gmail.com.

<3

POCZP

ZINESTER SPOTLIGHT: Celina Williams, Zinester & Librarian in Virginia

Some of Celina Williams' zines: POC zinester and librarian in Richmond, VA

[DESCRIPTION: Some of Celina Williams’ own zines. Photo credit: Celina]

By Cata, POCZP East Coast Intern/Coordinator

Celina Williams is a zinester, a librarian of special collections and a Richmond Zine Fest organizer for 5+ years. You can visit Celina and a zine collection within the James Branch Cabell Library in Richmond, VA.

Check out Richmond Zine Fest, happening this year on October 5th! Find out more at richmondzinefest.org. Richmond Zine Fest has been going strong in Richmond, VA, since 2007.

From Celina:

Richmond Zine Fest registration for workshops and tablers is open… if you know of any folks who’d be available/interested to participate Saturday Oct. 5th, I’d be happy to answer any questions.

POCZP’S Q&A WITH CELINA

POCZP: How long have you been making zines?

CELINA: Consciously, for the past 6+ years. When I was a kid I would play around with the stapler and make little books—those are zines right!?

POCZP: Nice! What kind of zines do you make currently?

CELINA: I make poetry and photo zines. My latest issue is Mean Girls and it’s about being told I look mean because I don’t smile. So it got me thinking about the mean/nice binary. Also, being a black and Hispanic woman, I am used to people commenting about my demeanor and look, they often say “what are you?”

POCZP: Any ideas for future zines?

CELINA: Actually, yes!! A friend and I were walking and noticing how trees often have these beautiful designs that often look look like vaginas, so a collaboration zine soon to be made will be called In the Tree’s Vagina.

POCZP: Awesome. Man, I can think of a lot of trees that would be perfect for your zine haha! Switching gears a bit, why do you think making zines is important?

CELINA: Well, I am a librarian and I view zines as creating a kind of archive for yourself. I see zines like that. But it’s an archive that you share. For example my mom bought me a diary when I was younger; but it felt weird to write and not share.

POCZP: Wow!! I love that because it makes me think of one of my favorite quotes “an untold story is the greatest burden” by Alice Walker.

CELINA: Right! And self-publication in zines is cool because in academia there is this rigid way you have to be—and that just doesn’t exist in zines.

POCZP: Any other things your working on?

CELINA: Yes! I am reorganizing the zine collection at our library (yes we have a zine collection!) and after this interview I will be finding out a way to tag and measure POC representation in our collection.

POCZP: That’s awesome! Let POC Zine Project know if you need any support! Any last exciting things happening in your community?

CELINA: Thank-you! and yes…Shout out to Richmond Zine Fest Co-organizers!! Which I’ve been a part of for the past 5+ years. Also, it was just international zine month so don’t forget to check out new zines!!

POCZP: Thank you!

</end>

CONTACT CELINA

celinanicoledoes.tumblr.com

Twitter.com/celinanicole

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

"Daniela Capistrano, founder of the POC Zine Project, contacted me in 2010 about digitizing and distributing for free the Race Riot compilation zines, which I made in 1997 and 2002. Her goals are numerous, but among them is to support and distribute independent publications by people of color, and to reclaim histories of people of color in publishing cultures, from FIRE! to Race Riot and more. I hadn’t thought about these zines for a while until Osa Atoe from Shotgun Seamstress (a zine for Black punks, feminists, queers, misfits, and freaks) wrote a Maximum Rocknroll column the year previous asking, “Where did all the black and brown punk foremothers go?” and naming me and some others specifically as missing persons. This resonated with me, since I was motivated at the time by a passionate desire to claim the fact of history –that we were here, black and brown punks, feminists, queers, misfits, and freaks—and acknowledge those who came before us and laid the foundations for our becoming punk, and those who were with us when we went through this (or that) moment together, and those who came after us who wonder where we are now.

So when I was scheduled in November 2011 to present an academic paper at the University of Pennsylvania, I contacted Jenna Freedman at the Barnard Zine Library (Jenna has focused that zine collection on women of color zines specifically) about doing an event there, at Barnard. In short order, she organized the first “Meet Me at the Race Riot” panel with Kate Wadkins of For the Birds Feminist Collective and Distro and Daniela of POC Zine Project. We had an in-depth dialogue with seventy-something people in this small windowless room, and Daniela thought, We should take this show on the road. The first POC Zine Project/Race Riot! Tour happened in September and October 2012 – 5 and sometimes 6 women of color in a van, hitting 14 cities and 20 events in 2 weeks. Every night –and sometimes twice in one day— we would read from our zines and facilitate these often super-intense conversations about structures of race and racism, punk activism, feminist art, anarchist politics, consent and accountability, violence, family histories and queer becoming. It was exhausting, but also exhilarating, to be a part of these conversations and to be able to facilitate and funnel some of what I know and do as a feminist scholar trained in comparative race studies and transnational cultural studies into these spaces – not just college classrooms, but also cafes, art collectives, living rooms, punk venues, independent bookstores, and more. One of the more significant consequences to growing up punk, for me, is an understanding that politics can and should be found and unfolded anywhere – and that one does not need to be an expert to be curious, outraged, or outspoken about the conditions that structure our everyday lives.

Until now, my punk history hasn’t been the subject of my scholarship, which is in the main concerned with liberal war, and liberal empire. But recent flurries of academic and popular inquiry into punk and riot grrrl have pulled me into their orbit. I’m somewhat conflicted about becoming an object of study, but I am coping by co-organizing an upcoming symposium with my amazing colleagues Ruth Nicole Brown, Karen Flynn, and Fiona I.B. Ngô, called “Hip Hop and Punk Feminisms: Theory, Genealogy, Performance.”

- Excerpt from POCZP touring member Mimi Thi Nguyen's interview with The Feminist Wire!

Thanks for the shout out, Mimi! <3

Learn more about the upcoming symposium “Hip Hop and Punk Feminisms: Theory, Genealogy, Performance.”

If you haven’t already, be sure to read Race Riot #1 & #2 <3

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

ZINE SPOTLIGHT: BROS FALL BACK (2013)
RELEASE: May 2013
ORIGIN: Philly, PA
AUTHOR: &#8220;The Secret Society of Femmes&#8221;
HOW TO BUY/ACCESS: Contact antieverythingshows@gmail.com directly for instructions on how to get a copy of the print version.
READ BROS FALL BACK NOW!
This is the print view version (only one available online) so it&#8217;s best viewed in full-screen mode.

POC ZINE PROJECT REVIEWS BROS FALL BACK
By Suzy X, POCZP touring member
Hi zinesters! Last month I had the pleasure of reading at Ladyfest Philly, where I read/performed from my middle school diaries. I was in great company, and many laughs (and tears) were shared.
But being the only author of color at the reading left me a little confused; there are actually plenty of POC doing radical, D.I.Y work in Philadelphia alone, and not enough of them were at this event! Hopefully next year&#8217;s zine reading can be a better reflection of that.So on that note, a new zine that I&#8217;m absolutely enamored with is BROS FALL BACK, a zine recently written by some QPOC based in Philly known as &#8220;The Secret Society of Femmes.&#8221;
Rather than resorting to the classic declaration of &#8220;girls to the front!&#8221; BROS FALL BACK takes a more intersectional approach to combating hetero-patriarchy in D.I.Y. and punk spaces. This shift in focus allows more room for those who are not &#8220;girls&#8221; nor &#8220;bros,&#8221; but are still fair game under white male supremacy.
The zine also delves into the racist and capitalist dynamics within punk culture, illustrating the slippery slope that starts with a new DIY space and ends with gentrification.
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[IMAGE DESCRIPTION: Suzy X holds her copy of BROS FALL BACK. Photo credit: Suzy X]
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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT
If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.
DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

ZINE SPOTLIGHT: BROS FALL BACK (2013)

RELEASE: May 2013

ORIGIN: Philly, PA

AUTHOR: “The Secret Society of Femmes”

HOW TO BUY/ACCESS: Contact antieverythingshows@gmail.com directly for instructions on how to get a copy of the print version.

READ BROS FALL BACK NOW!

This is the print view version (only one available online) so it’s best viewed in full-screen mode.

POC ZINE PROJECT REVIEWS BROS FALL BACK

By Suzy X, POCZP touring member

Hi zinesters! Last month I had the pleasure of reading at Ladyfest Philly, where I read/performed from my middle school diaries. I was in great company, and many laughs (and tears) were shared.

But being the only author of color at the reading left me a little confused; there are actually plenty of POC doing radical, D.I.Y work in Philadelphia alone, and not enough of them were at this event! Hopefully next year’s zine reading can be a better reflection of that.

So on that note, a new zine that I’m absolutely enamored with is BROS FALL BACK, a zine recently written by some QPOC based in Philly known as “The Secret Society of Femmes.”

Rather than resorting to the classic declaration of “girls to the front!” BROS FALL BACK takes a more intersectional approach to combating hetero-patriarchy in D.I.Y. and punk spaces. This shift in focus allows more room for those who are not “girls” nor “bros,” but are still fair game under white male supremacy.

The zine also delves into the racist and capitalist dynamics within punk culture, illustrating the slippery slope that starts with a new DIY space and ends with gentrification.

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[IMAGE DESCRIPTION: Suzy X holds her copy of BROS FALL BACK. Photo credit: Suzy X]

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT: #CAHungerStrike #PelicanBay Awareness

POCZP Donor and Resistance Behind Bars author Victoria Law (who also edits Tenacious zine) will be on the ”Melissa Harris-Perry" show this Saturday, July 13 (show starts at 10am ET), to talk about what is happening at #PelicanBay and other prisons in California. Vikki will be discussing her recent article about the Pelican Bay hunger strikes and the families organizing in support of their demands.

Follow #nerdland on Twitter to view the related conversation during the show.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT #CAHungerStrike

Right now 30,000 prisoners in California are on hunger strike. According to Amnesty International, that is the largest hunger strike in the state’s history, encompassing roughly two-thirds of the state’s inmates.

For additional context on why the strike is happening, check out some of the shocking facts in the infographic below on the conditions of indefinite isolation in California, where more than 3,000 prisoners are held in these high security isolation units known as Security Housing Units (SHUS).

Additionally, The Sacramento Bee reports that the Center for Investigative Reporting found that the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation sterilized nearly 150 female inmates from 2006 to 2010 without required state approvals.

[DESCRIPTION: This single page infographic by Amnesty International is best viewed in full screen mode to zoom in on sections]

Follow #CAHungerStrike on Twitter to stay informed. 

MORE INFO FROM HOMIES UNIDOS

The California Prisoner’s Hunger Strike started once again on July 8, 2013. The protesters have said that they will not stop until demands are addressed even if that means giving their lives.

Sign the petition: The Petition

Statewide Rally at Corcoran State Prison

Saturday, July 13, 3:00 PM

Bus and carpool leaves from Los Angeles at 8:30 AM, 

From: Chuco’s Justice Center,1137 E. Redondo, Inglewood

THE FIVE DEMANDS 

The inhumane conditions inside CA dungeons, particularly in isolation - a form of torture -, brought prisoners together across racial, geographic, and political lines. They united to end hostilities and fight for changes in SHU conditions. These men have suffered injustice and torture for decades. Governors, wardens, courts, and media have disregarded all previous attempts to change conditions. As a result, the hunger-strikers have placed their lives on the line and developed five core demands: Link for Flier

  • End Group Punishment & Administrative Abuse: Hold people accountable for their individualactions,rather than punishing everyone. Collective punishment is a fascist practice!
  • Abolish the Debriefing Policy, and Modify Active/Inactive Gang Status Criteria: The ‘debriefing’ policy is known as “snitch or die” - since the only way out of the SHU is to debrief (inform on another prisoner). In some cases, people have been in the SHUs since the ’60s or ’70s for political beliefs or jailhouse lawyering. 
  • End Long-Term Solitary Confinement. Comply with 2006 US Commission on Safety and Abuse in America’s Prisons. International human rights organizations recognize sensory deprivation is psychological torture. 
  • Provide Adequate and Nutritious Food, adequate medical care, and access to natural light.
  • Expand and Provide Constructive Programming and Privileges for Indefinite SHU Status Inmates. People in SHUs aren’t released, since there’s no constructive program available with which to qualify for parole.

Join the Hunger Strike Solidarity Coalition and bring in your school, union, community or coreligionists. Hunger Strike Solidarity So Cal Coalition (in formation) includes families, ex-prisoners & others. To get involved, 213-858-3486 or hungerstrikesolidaritysocal@gmail.com

For more information about the Five Core Demands, please visitprisonerhungerstrikesolidarity.wordpress.com  

Facebook Invite: https://www.facebook.com/events/672950029398476/

In October 2012 incarcerated people in the hunger strike came to an agreement to end all hostilities against each other, the agreement can be found here: 

http://prisonerhungerstrikesolidarity.wordpress.com/2012/09/11/short-corridor-collective-calls-for-statewide-end-to-hostilities/ 

ADDITIONAL MEDIA COVERAGE

Photos of Protesters Against Solitary Confinement - LA Daily News Media 

http://photos.dailynews.com/2013/07/photos-protesters-against-solitary-confinement/?utm_source=buffer&utm_campaign=Buffer&utm_content=buffere54e5&utm_medium=twitter#3

 Los Angeles Times:

Spanish Interviews:
Maria and Jesus Aguirre speak of their struggles with their loves in prison and the hunger strike. starts at 47 minutes.

http://archive.kpfk.org/mp3/kpfk_130709_213030vocesdelibertad.MP3

Spanish interview on Telemundo with Delia Rodriguez on the Hunger Strike:

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=4476878340187&set=o.520666777981595&type=2&theater 

Spanish coverage of the Hunger Strike:

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=4476560252235&set=o.520666777981595&type=2&theater 

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

June 30 is POC Zine Project’s One Year Tumblr Anniversary!

On June 30, 2012, The POC Zine Project Tumblr was “born” at Hive Learning Network NYC's Summer Code Party Pop-Up with Tumblr and Mozilla at DCTV. Not only did we receive help from Tumblr staff in setting up this Tumblr, POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano was able to share information in real time about POCZP at the event (see image from that day below) with attendees!

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Since June of 2012, POZCP has shared information about zines by people of color and intersectional projects with the Tumblr community. We brought you daily recaps from our first-ever Race Riot! Tour last fall because it was important to us to keep you informed.

For the past year, we’ve appreciate your submissions, reblogs and feedback. Prior to the launch of the POCZP Tumblr in 2012, we were actively “listening” on Tumblr through private accounts since 2007 — tracking “zine”-tagged posts, observing how folks of color from all walks of life use Tumblr, how zinesters were using Tumblr and figuring out what our short and long term goals are for this space <3

We hope that we help make your Tumblr explorations a fun, inspiring and informative experience. If you’ve benefitted in any way from our efforts on Tumblr, please consider making a donation of any amount to POC Zine Project.

We are in the process of planning our second Race Riot! Tour and must raise $14,000 to cover the costs of a 20 city national tour, which will take place in October and November of 2013. We’ve expanded the tour to include cities in the midwest and a date in Mexico. We know we can do it but we need your help. <3 Thanks for your support.

- POC Zine Project

P.S. If you don’t have any funds—we hear ya! POCZP is a grassroots organization and we are all volunteers. We have operated without 501(c)(3) status the past three years for a reason: to stay as free as possible, so we can move as quickly as possible. Help the cause by forwarding this link to friends on your social accounts, email and by reblogging. We appreciate the love.

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh