POC ZINE PROJECT

Posts tagged Harlem

zwei-perspektiven:

A palestinan protester climbs the west bank barrier on Friday (16.08.13) in the village of Nilin, close to Ramallah, Palestine. On the wall is a graffiti saying: “Freedom is never given by the oppressor - It must be demanded by the oppressed”. The weekly taking place protest between IDF and locals guides often into clashes.

We hope this photo further inspires you to speak truth to power.
POC have used street art and independent publications such as zines, chapbooks and pamphlets for decades to share the truth about institutional racism and other oppressions.
POC have also used - and continue to use - independent publications to bring POC together in an exchange of ideas, often forbidden or censored by mainstream media.
A zine can be many things, including a catalyst for change.
If you haven’t already read FIRE!! Devoted To Younger Negro Artists (1926), please check it out today.  

zwei-perspektiven:

A palestinan protester climbs the west bank barrier on Friday (16.08.13) in the village of Nilin, close to Ramallah, Palestine. On the wall is a graffiti saying: “Freedom is never given by the oppressor - It must be demanded by the oppressed”. The weekly taking place protest between IDF and locals guides often into clashes.

We hope this photo further inspires you to speak truth to power.

POC have used street art and independent publications such as zines, chapbooks and pamphlets for decades to share the truth about institutional racism and other oppressions.

POC have also used - and continue to use - independent publications to bring POC together in an exchange of ideas, often forbidden or censored by mainstream media.

A zine can be many things, including a catalyst for change.

If you haven’t already read FIRE!! Devoted To Younger Negro Artists (1926), please check it out today.  

#IZM2013 ZINE MUST-READ: FIRE!! Devoted To Younger Negro Artists (1926)

Today’s International Zine Month suggested activity is to reread your favorite zines and remind yourself why you love them so much. Here’s a favorite from our archive: 

In the spirit of #IZM2013, we are excited to announce that the first zine in POC Zine Project’s Legacy Series, FIRE!! Devoted To Younger Negro Artists (1926), is now available to read online, for free:

POCZP helped to liberate this groundbreaking zine by people of color from 1926 in collaboration with firepress.com

ABOUT FIRE!! Devoted To Younger Negro Artists

In November of 1926, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Wallace Thurman, Aaron Douglas, Richard Bruce Nugent, Gwendolyn Bennett and John P. Davis released FIRE!!.

Excerpt from description on harlemsreflection.tumblr.com:

Fire!! was conceived with the notion of expressing the Black experience during the Harlem Renaissance in a modern and realistic fashion, using literature as a vehicle of enlightenment. The authors of this magazine wanted an arena to express the changing attitudes of younger African Americans and used Fire!! to facilitate the exploration of issues in the Black community that were not in the forefront of mainstream African American society such as homosexuality, bisexuality, interracial relationships, promiscuity, prostitution, and color prejudice within the Black community itself.

The publication was so named, according to Langston Hughes, “to burn up a lot of the old, dead conventional Negro-white ideas of the past … into a realization of the existence of the younger Negro writers and artists, and provide us with an outlet for publication not available in the limited pages of the small Negro magazines then existing.” Ironically, the magazine’s headquarters burned to the ground shortly after releasing its first issue.

We’re kicking off our Legacy Series initiative next week by celebrating and analyzing FIRE!! in a series of multimedia posts (read our original Legacy Series announcement).

Stay tuned for more coverage, but in the meantime, enjoy and share this digital version of FIRE!!

- POC Zine Project

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

ZINE SPOTLIGHT: ‘Tourist Art’ takes on Haitian art, tourism, border relations, commercialization and the global art market

tourist art

TITLE: Tourist Art

CREATORS: Gabrielle Civil and Vladimir Cybil Charlier

Gabrielle Civil is a black woman poet, conceptual and performance artist originally from Detroit, MI. A catalogue of her work “In & Out of Place: Black Feminist Performance Art in Mexico” was announced for fall 2012. She teaches at St. Catherine University in St. Paul, MN. The aim of her work is to open up space.

Vladimir Cybil Charlier explores the construction of visual language and identity from the perspective of a Haitian-American who has lived in and between cultures. In 2007, she and her husband André Juste represented Haiti at the Venice Biennale. She lives and works in Harlem and Philmont, New York.

RELEASE: October 2012 through CreateSpace

BUY NOW on Amazon for $9.06

DESCRIPTION BY THE AUTHORS:

Combining original poetry, drawings and watercolors, Tourist Art addresses Haitian art, tourism, border relations, commercialization, and the global art market. Created by two Haitian diasporic artists, the book highlights multiple ironies: how Haitian tourist art is produced in Haiti, a place with virtually no tourists; how it is the shadow of a rich, Haitian fine art tradition collected around the world; and, how Haitian tourist souvenirs are exported and sold in high volume, largely outside of Haiti itself. “tourist art is always selling time. wood carvings, figurines, postcards of sans souci. in santo domingo, viejo san juan, nassau, brooklyn, miami, detroit, in holes in the wall. tourist art by haitians doesn’t need haitians at all.”

Carefully designed, each page of the book offers iconic, Haitian images (market women with baskets, vodou spirits, historical figures), juxtaposed with pop images of globalization (tour guide badges, McDonald’s French fries, a do-not-enter sign.) Ultimately, the poem reveals how Haitian art receives more mobility and access than Haitian people. “take the art tour. to jacmel air stream to boston donkey hoof to port-au-prince shark raft to montreal cracked foot to cap haitïen tap tap to brooklyn aux cayes dark limousine visa to miami shot to croix-des-bouquets return tracery of tourist art itinerary en route.”

Exploring cultural authenticity and commerce, Tourist Art is the only fine artist book in the Haitian diaspora to tackle high and low culture in art. Its production through print-on-demand technology underlines this concept. The book’s rich language and dazzling illustrations are overall a stunning achievement.

POCZP REVIEWS TOURIST ART

By Chaun Webster, POCZP Midwest Coordinator

What an explosion of the senses in Gabrielle Civil and Vladimir Cybil Charlier’s Tourist Art. Its serene water color paintings are juxtaposed by the sometimes clean, sometimes spiraling yet always piercing text addressing the relationship between the mobility of Haiti’s artistic production and the stinging immobility of Haiti’s people.  

I found myself dizzy by the power of the questions being raised, “haitians walking in place, waiting to travel to the money embrace, standing still, omnipresent, erased. ourist art as static market place.”

At the heart I hear this book howling for space, psychic and material, for a transgression of borders, for where do oppressed peoples find reprieve when the markets consume everything?  Our cultures, which are a means of mapping freedom, of carving out more terrain for struggle, are so important to the vitality of our resistance.  

What happens then when they are bound to an insatiable market which speaks only in the vocabulary of “more.” That “more” a violence which Civil and Charlier turn on its head as they employ the making of an object.  

Seemingly odd in that it is the objects of Haiti’s artistic production that are being so fetishized by way of the silenced inhumanities of the conditions endured. This object though takes form at the intersection of a mirror and a hammer to make known the invisibilities, and build a room for another discourse, creative and treacherous. Read this and be read by it!  

Here is treacherous discourse, here is trickster tale wrapped in fine art as it mocks it, here is a poetics that doesn’t cover but sharpen the blade!!

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COMMUNITY: Do you want to review zines for POCZP? Learn more about POCZP internship & volunteer opportunities here. We are still accepting applications. 

If you are interested in POCZP leading a workshop or other event in collaboration with your organization - worldwide - email poczineproject@gmail.com.

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

Meet POCZP’s Chief Fanalyst for the Legacy Series: Julia B. aka Ju!

Julia B., or Ju: First Official Fanalyst to participate in the POC Zine Project's Legacy Series

NAME: Julia B. (also goes by Ju)

ROLE: Chief Fanalyst for POC Zine Project’s Legacy Series

REGION: East Coast (Brooklyn), USA

COMMUNITY: Ju has been a POCZP member since the beginning. You’ll be seeing more of their contributions manifest on this Tumblr and in other digital and physical spaces very soon …. <3

IN JU’S OWN WORDS

Hi there. I’m Julia B., or Ju (if we’re being informal, which suits me fine), and I’m the first Official (and Chief) Fanalyst to participate in the POC Zine Project’s Legacy Series!

I’m very excited to be part of this series, and I’m looking forward to sharing more about the first Legacy Series selection: Fire!!: A Quarterly Devoted to the Younger Negro Artists, published in 1926. I should probably begin by explaining what my role will be.

fan: As in, amateur. I’m not a professional historian, just an enthusiastic history lover with library access. Whether it’s sci-fi fans swapping self-written stories through the mail, or specialized distros offering up all manner of self-published work at concerts, zine readings and the like, zine culture has consistently been defined by its place outside of the traditional publishing world. Keeping that in mind, the folks writing this series are taking part because we genuinely love the works we’re talking about, and want to share those works as laypeople in an accessible way.

analyst: I’ll be doing a close read and giving background details about the magazine, page by page. Sort of like “Pop-Up Video” but in written form.

Graphic for Ju's Chief Fanalyst bio In lieu of elaborate on-location choreography, I’ll be taking you further into not only the text of Fire!!, but also the world in which it was published—from the author’s contemporaries to the neighborhood in which their office was situated, and more. Ideally, by the time you’re done checking out what I’ve got for you, you’ll have music to listen to, visual artists to check out, books you’ll want to look for. Like I said, I’m enthusiastic about history, and my goal is to make sure that you’re just as thrilled about learning more as I was doing the research.

So why exactly am I so thrilled to be working on Fire!! in particular? Well, as a literature fan, I’ve loved Zora Neale Hurston’s, Langston Hughes’, and Countee Cullen’s writing for years. For many, those names might be the most familiar in the list of contributors to Fire!!, and I’m sure a lot of you out there are already fans of their work. But what of the other contributors alluded to in the “younger negro artists” of the magazine’s title? I see this as a chance for those who are more familiar with the writers in this publication to learn more about the visual artists who contributed, and vice versa, while I take a look at the perspectives that link them all together.

I’m also excited because Fire!! was controversial in its time. The contributors were not interested in perpetuating the politics of respectability. They did not create the magazine to keep in step with the artists of generations before them. In short, they were uncomfortable because they refused to conform to more (Black middle-class) palatable sensibilities.

I mean, check out some of the stuff people were saying when this little magazine out of Harlem made its way into print:

Rean Graves of the Baltimore Afro-American [newspaper] was incensed by the magazine and wrote in his review, “I have just tossed the first issue of Fire!! into the fire.” Benjamin Brawley went so far as to say that if the U.S. Post Office found out about Thurman’s “Cordelia the Crude,” the magazine might be barred from the mail.[1]

Pretty strong reactions to a fledgling publication! The contributors wrote about touchy subjects such as colorism among Black Americans and prostitution. They made deliberate use of Black American vernacular, in an effort to make the voices of their works ring true to the people they represented. And pissed off a bunch of uptight people in the process, even though only one issue of Fire!! was ever published. It’s easy to think of “cutting edge” in the present tense, but in exploring the magazine, we get the chance to check out what the Black American nonconformists of 1926 had to say, and what value those messages hold for us in the present day.

Anyway, enough out of me! I’m looking forward to talking with you further… hopefully we can start a cool conversation (or several) about this classic work. Stay tuned!

[1]: Patton, Venetria K., and Maureen Honey. “The Harlem Renaissance.” Oxford African American Studies Center: Guest Scholars. Oxford University Press. Web. <http://www.oxfordaasc.com/public/featureded/guest_5.jsp>

DO YOU WANT TO BE A FANALYST FOR THE LEGACY SERIES?

The only criteria is that you have to be a person of color! Submit here and tell us a little about yourself. Please include links to some writing samples. Good luck!

White allies: There are other ways for you to support the Legacy Series. Please email daniela@dcapmedia.com for details.

ABOUT THE LEGACY SERIES

Kicking off with FIRE!!, POC Zine Project will make zines by people of color created from the 1700s-1990s available to read and share.

Every Friday (Editor’s note: date pushed to February), you will find a legacy zine by a person of color on poczineproject.tumblr.com. We will share more details in 2013.

WHY WE ARE FOCUSING ON LEGACY ZINES

People of color in the U.S. have produced independent publications (zines) for decades. Many of these zines were political in nature, creating cracks in the lens of white supremacy that shaped (and continues to inform) popular culture and legislation.

These zines were new maps to our liberation, countering the negative propaganda of what people of color looked like, thought and were capable of achieving.

We want the world to know about these legacy zines, so we are going to archive and share them to the best of our ability.

We look forward to partnering with distros, academic spaces, libraries, anti-authoritarian collectives, literary journals, bloggers and more to share the Legacy Series.

“NEW” ZINESTERS: We will still share information about new and upcoming zines by people of color :) Please continue to submit your zines to the archive.

ABOUT THE RACE RIOT! TOUR

POC Zine Project held its first Race Riot! Tour in 2012, producing 20 events in 14 cities, which included speaking engagements at six universities. Click here to view photos from the POC Zine Project: 2012 Race Riot! Tour tour finale at Death By Audio in Brooklyn and access all the tour stop recaps.

We will be taking the Race Riot! Tour through 14 more cities in 2013. Stay tuned!

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

POC Zine Project announces 'Legacy Series': zines by POC from 2000s - 1700s

THE LEGACY SERIES

Kicking off with FIRE!!, POC Zine Project will make zines by people of color created from the 1700s-2000s available to read and share.

In 2014, you will find a legacy zine by a person of color featured on poczineproject.tumblr.com every month. We will share more details in early 2014.

DEFINING A ‘LEGACY’ ZINE

POC Zine Project defines a legacy zine as an independent publication created by a person of color (or group led by POC) during the 1700s - 2000.

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines legacy as the following:

1
: a gift by will especially of money or other personal property : bequest
2
: something transmitted by or received from an ancestor or predecessor or from the past <the legacy of the ancient philosophers>

Zines by people of color from the 1700s-2000 tell many stories that weren’t shared by publishers and newspapers of their day. These zines aren’t any less valuable because they weren’t created as a biproduct of the Riot Grrrl movement, or didn’t have sci-fi themes (although some did!).

RIOT GRRRL DOESN’T OWN ZINE CULTURE

Riot Grrrl generated a wealth of inspiring and informative zines from the 1990s to today, but that isn’t the only story. In direct response to the erasure that POC have experienced in the retelling and whitewashing of punk, feminist, and indie publishing histories, POC Zine Project will spend 2013 and beyond sharing zines by people of color that tell us more about our roles in these movements and beyond.

POC Zine Project is an experiment in activism and community through materiality. We are for creating new mappings of our consciousness in opposition to institutionalized oppression. 

Through the Legacy Series, we will celebrate the zines that were created by people of color to foster awareness, community, revolution and liberation in all its forms.

Since our access at this time is to legacy zines created in the U.S., that is what the bulk of the initial release will be. POCZP  was founded in the U.S. but that isn’t our focus. We are actively seeking legacy zines created by POC outside the U.S. and will share those as we acquire them.

WHY WE ARE FOCUSING ON LEGACY ZINES

People of color (men and women) in the U.S. have produced independent publications (zines) since the 1700s. Many of these zines were political in nature, creating cracks in the lens of white supremacy that shaped popular culture.

These zines were new maps to our liberation, countering the negative propaganda of what people of color looked like, thought and were capable of achieving.

We want the world to know about these legacy zines, so we are going to archive and share them to the best of our ability.

We look forward to partnering with distros, academic spaces, libraries, anti-authoritarian collectives, literary journals, bloggers and more to share the Legacy Series. Contact daniela@dcapmedia.com if you are interested in collaborating.

WHY WE’RE STARTING WITH FIRE!!

A zine’s influence should not be defined solely by reviewers, subscriber count or the amount of copies in circulation.

LEARN MORE:

harlemsreflection:

image

Fire!! was an African American literary magazine published in 1926 during the Harlem Renaissance. The publication was started by Wallace ThurmanZora Neale HurstonAaron DouglasJohn P. DavisRichard Bruce NugentGwendolyn BennettLewis Grandison AlexanderCountee Cullen, and Langston Hughes.

Fire!! Magazine was a quarterly literature magazine. Only one expenditure of the magazine appeared, i.e. the expenditure from November 1926. It was driven out mainly in New Yorker quarters the Manhattan, into which it by the artists involved by hand one delivered. Fire!! the language pipe of the recent black generation of the Harlem was Renaissance. The young artists at the age between 20 and 31 were dissatisfied with the established, older leaders of the movement. The original title read Fire!! A Quarterly Devoted to the Younger Negro Artists.

Emergence

Starting point of Fire!! the famous artist colony was Nigerati Manor in Harlem. Here one came out in the summer 1926 on the idea to bring its own artist magazine. Among the initial members Wallace Thurman, Zora Neal Hurston, Aaron Douglas, John P ranked. Davis, Richard Bruce Nugent, Gwendolyn Bennett and long clay/tone Hughes. Everyone of these authors should contribute with a starting capital of 50 $ for the pressure of the first expenditure. The further expenditures should be financed by proceeds as well as by donations. This magazine should fulfill the following requirements according to the authors however:

  • The magazine should be understood not as documentation about art, but be represented a work of art. In addition much importance was attached to aesthetic aspects, e.g. Quality of the paper, format, etc.
  • The magazine should be exclusively “devoted ton the younger Negro artist”, itself thus exclusively with “recent” topics like e.g. employ. Hughes described the intention of the young authors in its essay The Negro kindist and the Racial Mountain, publishes 1926 in The nation:

Incoming goods of younger Negro artists who create now intend tons of express our individually dark skinned selves without fear or shame. If white people acres pleased incoming goods of acres glad. If they acres emergency, it doesn’t more matt. Incoming goods know incoming goods of acres beautiful. And ugly too. The tom tom cries and the tom tom laughs. If colored people acres pleased incoming goods of acres glad. If they acres emergency, their displeasure doesn’t more matt more either. Incoming goods build our temples for tomorrow, strong as incoming goods know-how, and incoming goods stood for on top OF the mountain, free within ourselves.

  • In addition the magazine should be so put on that it releases the greatest possible scandal with the white and black establishment.

The name of the magazine was selected following a mirror-image ritual by long clay/tone Hughes.

Contents

Aaron Douglas made the Covergestaltung, as well as three further designs available.

Richard Bruce Nugent took part with two designs as well as the Kurzgeschichte Smoke, Lilies and Jade.

Wallace Thurman was chief executive publisher and enriched Fire!! with an editorial comment as well as with the KurzgeschichteCordelia the Crude.

Zora Neale Hurston wrote the play Color struck and the Kurzgeschichte Sweat.

Gwendolyn Bennett published a Kurzgeschichte, Wedding Day.

Arthur Huff Fauset contributed the essay Intelligentsia.

The following authors arranged the poem part:

Countee Cullen, Helene Johnson, EDP pool of broadcasting corporations Silvera, Waring Cuney, long clay/tone Hughes, Arna Bontemps and Lewis Alexander.

With 1 $ the magazine was approximately four times as expensive as other magazines Zeit.Das magazine was 48 sides strongly.

Meaning

Fire!! was the first joint venture of black authors, which came without the money of wealthy white sponsors. This form of the Patronage was far common, with the Machern of Fire!! however

A group of the authors (among other things Thurman and Hughes) created it with only one expenditure to be established as speakers of a generation of young authors up to then.

In addition, it must be said that the main intention of the authors was not reached to frighten i.e. the black establishment in such a manner that it came to a scandal and the expenditure was censored or even forbidden. With this scandal, which e.g. with Carl van Vechtens novel Nigger Heaven occurred, the authors expected a very fast spreading of Fire!! and larger publicity.

Fire!! found only again into the 1970er/80er years attention as new culture and literature theories developed. It was again presented into the 1980er years.

 

History

Fire!! was conceived with the notion of expressing the Black experience during the Harlem Renaissance in a modern and realistic fashion, using literature as a vehicle of enlightenment. The authors of this magazine wanted an arena to express the changing attitudes of younger African Americans and used Fire!! to facilitate the exploration of issues in the Black community that were not in the forefront of mainstream African American society such as homosexuality, bisexuality, interracial relationships, promiscuity, prostitution, andcolor prejudice within the Black community itself.

The publication was so named, according to Langston Hughes, “to burn up a lot of the old, dead conventional Negro-white ideas of the past … into a realization of the existence of the younger Negro writers and artists, and provide us with an outlet for publication not available in the limited pages of the small Negro magazines then existing.”.

Ironically, the magazine’s headquarters burned to the ground shortly after releasing its first issue.

Contributors

Wallace Thurman
Zora Neale Hurston
Langston Hughes
Aaron Douglas
Richard Bruce Nugent
Gwendolyn Bennett
Countee Cullen
Waring Cuney
Arna Bontemps
Helene Johnson
Edward Silvera
Arthur Huff Fauset
Lewis Alexander

(Source: firepress.com)

NEW ZINESTERS: We will still share information about new and upcoming zines by people of color :) Please continue to submit your zines to the archive.

<3 - POC Zine Project