POC ZINE PROJECT

Posts tagged Joyce Hatton

Joyce Hatton is making it happen!! Check out the poster for the upcoming Fargo-Moorhead Zine Fest!
Fargo-Moorhead Zine Fest is September 7th, 2013! 
FMZF was founded by Joyce Hatton, Midwest Coordinator of the POC Zine Project. Email fargomoorheadzinefest at gmail dot com for more information, or ‘ask’ at fargomoorheadzinefest.tumblr.com.
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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT
If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.
DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

Joyce Hatton is making it happen!! Check out the poster for the upcoming Fargo-Moorhead Zine Fest!

Fargo-Moorhead Zine Fest is September 7th, 2013!

FMZF was founded by Joyce Hatton, Midwest Coordinator of the POC Zine Project. Email fargomoorheadzinefest at gmail dot com for more information, or ‘ask’ at fargomoorheadzinefest.tumblr.com.

_____________________

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

POC Zine Project at Allied Media Conference (Pt 3 of 3]: City Dreams Youth Zine Workshop

Allied Media Conference 2013  was from June 20 - 23, 2013. This is POCZP Midwest Coordinator Joyce Hatton's recap from #AMC2013 on Sunday, June 23. Read the first and second installments by POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano.

CITY DREAMS workshop at AMC2013

 [DESCRIPTION: City Dreams Youth Zine Workshop facilitators and attendees on June 23, 2013 during #AMC2013 in Detroit]

Words and photos by Joyce Hatton, POCZP Midwest Coordinator

The City Dreams Youth Zine Workshop took place Sunday, June 23rd, at the 15th Annual Allied Media Conference in Detroit, MI. The workshop facillitators were Becca Hayes from Michigan State University; Katie Violet Livingston and Casey Miles from Michigan State University and Queer Theory Playground, and Rachel Storm from Outta the Mouths of Babes Youth Radio Project, Urbana-Champaign Independent Media Center, and myself. Another person who was going to co-facilitate decided not to, which none of us had a problem with since five of us was plenty.

Here is the description of the workshop:

Using guided collage-making, youth will envision their cities as dream-cities – full of art, culture, safe homes and strong communities. Youth participants will think through how they could improve their own communities as they create images of what they desire in their cities, neighborhoods, or homes. Collaged images will be assembled into a zine, “City Dreams!,” and copied for all youth participants and distributed in small circulation at the AMC conference.

We had a great time! Five kids attended and three adults. Of the eight, four had never heard of zines before, so there was a nice mix of teaching and sharing of experiences.

We talked about how zines can be a great way to share your art and writings, and also how collaborative zines are a great way to create community. That was a great lesson for me to learn, as I had never made a collaborative zine before.

Before: Prepping For The Workshop

Since we lived in three different cities, we used email to plan the workshop, and we met once we got to AMC to go over some details.

I brought pre-folded pocket zines and instructions on how to fold them- to show that there are different types of zines, and because pocket zines are totally awesome.

But the main reason I brought the pocket zines was to retain what I think is the most powerful moment in a zine workshop: That moment when a person realizes “I can use this to say anything I want… what do I want to say?”

When a zine workshop has a theme, it can take away from the feeling of empowerment, and can make zine-making feel like it’s not something a person can do on their own. I thought that spending a few minutes encouraging kids to make their own pocket zines later might increase the empowerment factor.

During: City Dreams Youth Zine Workshop

It was so much fun! We shared some information about zines, talked about healthy communities, what we liked about the cities that we lived in, and just chit-chatted in general while we worked.

Siuloong: City Dreams zine at AMC2013

[DESCRIPTION: Siuloong did an awesome four page spread for City Dreams zine about what makes great community]

I met some really cool people that day, but I really have a special place in my heart for Amarisa, who is maybe 9 or 10. She talked about how the police in her school make her feel unsafe.

amarisa: City Dreams Zine at AMC2013

[DESCRIPTION: Amarisa’s zine pages about police abusing power, part of the City Dreams zine made at #AMC2013]

I took the opportunity to validate her feelings, and said “That’s really crappy that you feel unsafe in school, and I want you to know that there are people who are working to get the police out of your school, and I hope they do it soon.” And she said “Yes, because that’s where I go to get my education, and I should feel comfortable there, so I can focus on learning!” It was such a rewarding experience for me.

The other kids who were there had made zines before, but Amarisa and her friend Angel had never heard of zines before. When I gave them the pocket zines, they were so excited that they had a medium that they could use to express themselves. I hope they do! Their voices matter!

Jamii: City Dreams zine at AMC2013

[DESCRIPTION: City Dreams zines contributor Jamii did an illustration about backyard gardens: “Sankofa, valuing the earth.”]

I kept a close watch on time to have plenty of time for working on the zine, and so we would have enough time to share at the end of the session. Even so, everyone was working down to the last minute!

Our group was really creative. I let them know that it was OK if they took their zine pages home to finish them rather than have them be included in the zine, because it’s nice to have options. I think everyone submitted all their pages to the zine, though.

After: Lessons From The Workshop

I asked a participant if she identified as disabled, so I could make note in the zine, to give visibility to disabled and differently abled zinesters. As I asked her, I was reminded of my internalized ableism, and very quickly we realized we had a lot we wanted to talk about, so we went out for coffee and had an amazing conversation about a wide range of topics.

We had such a good conversation that I totally lost track of time and did not have time to go make copies of the zine for participants.

In hindsight I realized there wouldn’t have been enough time anyway. One of the areas we had really failed to plan out was how we planned to print out the zine. I was able to get everyone’s address, and once I got back I copied the zine and mailed them. Everyone got two color copies of the zine, and five black and white copies.

City Dreams zine made at AMC2013

[DESCRIPTION: City Dreams zine] 

I was glad I was able to present a workshop at my first AMC. It really contributed to my overall experience.

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LOOKING FOR MORE? 

- POC Zine Project’s workshop recap (with MOONROOT and Adela C. Licona) from the 2013 Allied Media Conference

- Zines in the classroom: Pros and Cons

- Pocket zine-making workshop with an all-Native Girl Scout Troop

- Oasis for Girls zine-making workshop

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

ZINE SPOTLIGHT: Not Straight Not White Not Male

NOT STRAIGHT NOT WHITE NOT MALE

TITLE: Not Straight Not White Male

AUTHOR: rosi

ORIGIN: Los Angeles, USA

RELEASE: December, 2012

DESCRIPTION BY AUTHOR:

I wrote this zine because there is a lack of media that I can really, truly relate to. It is glaringly obvious that this radical scene is comprised mostly of heteros, of whites, and of males. I am Asian, I am hella gay, and I am female.

Disclaimer: I wrote this for me a lot more than I wrote it for you. There is a lack of solution offering, and at the same time a lot rambling, because it is cathartic for me. It is highly anecdotal; I write from experience. Don’t assume that my aim is to educate ignorant fucks. It is not my job to cry and bleed so that they can fucking evolve.

Always for the greater gay,
xROSIx

ROSI, IN HER OWN WORDS:

I am Vietnamese-American, female and hella gay (also vegan, straightedge, intersectional-feminist, anti-theist/agnostic and non-pacifist). So this is written from that perspective.

POCZP REVIEWS ‘NOT STRAIGHT NOT WHITE NOT MALE’

By Joyce Hatton, POCZP Midwest Coordinator

Yesterday I was leaving the gym with a friend of mine, and we were debating the existence of the “Lobster and Lefse Festival.”  I said “But it’s a whole weekend! How can you make a whole weekend out of lobster and lefse?!”  Two older white women started chatting with us and assured us that it was a real thing, and yes, it was a weekend long.  It was a friendly chat until one woman said “Here in North Dakota we can make a weekend out of anything,” and suddenly my friend and I weren’t laughing.

It hurts when people assume that I’m not from here, that their culture is not my culture.  It burns, because I know the only reason they think that is because I’m black.  I am steeped in Uff da culture, this is my home, but I am always treated as in outsider in my home.

I recently read “Not Straight Not White Not Male” by rosi, and it was a balm to my irritated soul.  In the disclaimer she said “I wrote this for me a lot more than I wrote it for you.  There is a lack of solution offering and at the same time a lot of rambling, because it is cathartic for me. Don’t assume that my aim is to educate ignorant fucks.  It is not my job to cry and bleed so that they can fucking evolve.”

rosi addresses many issues, her relationship with her mother, who rosi sometimes felt embarrassed by, because of her mother’s lack of assimilation into American culture; privilege; a desire to be white/internalized racism; becoming comfortable with her Asian identity; misogyny; animal rights, and more.  rosi writes about these topics very honestly and with so much anger, but amazingly, no bitterness.  It was very helpful and eye opening for me to read, as I struggle with many similar issues.

I think that, in addition to “just” being cathartic, zines such as this contribute to a person’s growth.  For a person of color to admit to themselves that they want/had wanted to be white is a huge thing, and to share that with someone else is so powerful.  Internalized racism is partnered with shame, and so to be able to open up and communicate about these issues, and learn that other people feel this way to, is a huge step to decolonizing the mind.

In “Proving Myself: as an Asian and as a Female” rosi shares the way her thoughts influence her actions.  For example, if a man notices them checking the oil level in her car, she will go buy oil and add some, just to show the man that, yes, she, a woman, knows how to replace her oil!  It seems that rosi has had her competency called into question so often that she feels the need to preemptively display her ability.  It is so unfortunate when we modify our behavior to suit or defy those people, because that means we are less free.  We think we are defying the bigotry, but really it is winning because we are still letting it control us.  rosi knows this, and as she noted, she offers no solutions, but it’s a big, wonderful deal to know you’re not alone in that struggle.

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CONTACT ROSI + ORDER NOT STRAIGHT NOT WHITE MALE

forthegreatergay.tumblr.com/ask

forthegreatergay@gmail.com

Order on Etsy

ORDERING NOTE FROM ROSI:

GEEEET IIIT:
- i won’t charge you if you live in vietnam.
- if you need a shipping option for your country added, let me know
- real-life friends, you don’t have to pay me, doopies.
- can’t afford it? wanna trade for your zines? message me
- if you want a pdf instead of a hard copy, message me before even adding it to you cart.
- infoshops, distros, galleries; let me know in what spaces you plan on hosting this zine

'NOT STRAIGHT NOT WHITE NOT MALE' CONTENTS

Hand-designed cover

Introduction note

And Ode to Chinkophiles: Y.e.l.l.o.w.F.e.v.e.r

Chauncey: This fucking guy” - a detailed account of the wildly inappropriate escapades of a middle-aged white man projecting his yellow fetish onto yours truly

I Have Discovered the Words with Which to Express my Visceral Resentment of White Cockiness” - where I bitterly examine my aesthetic inferiority complex
(^ and a follow-up clarification on the preceding essay)

Sorry, Mom” - being vietnamese-american in america can be fucking irritating..

Pre-Gay” - some things i want to say to old friends and family

But Really, Come On, You Surely Know By Now” - about the differences in expectations in ‘female’ attire and aesthetic and ‘male’ attire and aesthetic

Dysfunction Over Fashion” - how my boi-complex fucks with my wardrobe choices

Proving Myself: as an Asian and as a Female” - where I discuss, shortly, my relentless need to prove to everyone that I can be “better” than my stereotype
(^ and a follow-up clarification on the preceding essay)

Your Masculinity is Under Attack: In response to the new onslaught of ad campaigns that perpetuate sexism under the guise of ‘making fun of sexism through exaggeration’” - an obnoxious, satirical piece

A Documentation of Vocalized, 21st Century Gendered Bigotry” - where i list just a few months’ worth of sexist, patronizing remarks

A Documentation of Vocalized, 21st Century Racial Bigotry” - where i list some racist remarks I’ve received throughout my life

Not Asian Enough / Too Asian: month one - working in a Vietnamese restaurant couched in white O.C.

Broken” - a weird arty thing symbolizing South East Asian-American diasporic identity crises idk

E.S.L.” - short and dry. about my being a 1st generation American in my family and not understanding American customs

A/S/L? 13/M/CA” - a short essay about how i used to create online role-playing characters to live out my dreams and escape my identity

Don’t Tell Your Parents I Think They’re Racist: (unless I’ve asked you to)” - PSA to white allies. In summary, don’t decide for me when I should have race talks/race fights, and don’t decide for me which relationships I must now compromise for the “greater good”

White People Making White People Jokes” - where i discuss why i don’t think it’s always appropriate

Sup, Hypocrites” - shortly addressing skinny-shame, prude-shame, and femme-shame

Microcosms of Patriarchy” - hiding from the world in the radical scene does not mean hiding from non-consensual, intimate contact, unfortunately

Being Conscious of Womanhood” - an analysis of the unconscious things i do because i am hyper-aware of what it means to be a woman in this society

On Privilege, Allies, and Bitterness” - me listing and rambling for a page about the aforementioned topics

Cathartic Vomit” - me being pissed about this and that

comic relief

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COMMUNITY: Do you want to review zines for POCZP? Learn more about POCZP internship & volunteer opportunities here. We are still accepting applications. 

If you are interested in POCZP leading a workshop or other event in collaboration with your organization - worldwide - email poczineproject@gmail.com.

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

SCENE REPORT [MIDWEST]: Fargo-Moorhead Zine Fest organizing is coming along nicely!

image

Fargo-Moorhead Zine Fest was created by POCZP Midwest Coordinator Joyce Hatton. The fest goes down September 7th, 2013.

For more information, visit fargomoorheadzinefest.tumblr.com and “like” facebook.com/FargoMoorheadZineFest.

By Joyce Hatton, POCZP Midwest Coordinator

Exciting news! There will be a screening of the movie “Rez” directed by Dominique DeLeon.  After the screening, there will be a Q&A with members of the crew. “Rez” tells the story of a young Anishinaabe teen who is caring for his younger sister on the Leech Lake reservation in Minnesota. “Rez” was filmed in Cass Lake, MN, and the 17 cast members, 13 of them are from Cass Lake.  For more information, go to specialboyfilms.com.

Also: FMZF has a sponsor!  The Rourke Art Gallery Museum has offered the use of their museum to host community zine workshops.  There will be three per month during June, July and August.  This will be a great way to build up excitement and awareness about FMZF, as well as create many positive opportunities for community building.

This sponsorship from the Rourke is very exciting and gratifying.  I began organizing in January, and this is only the second solid outcome I’ve had as a result of my outreach efforts.  A huge part of organizing is persistence!  At times the lack of response to emails and phone calls was very frustrating.  There were some false starts, opportunities that were unworkable due to time or location constraints, or other unknown issues.

The goal is that FMZF be a diverse event, meaning: people of many different races, ethnicities, cultures, religions, genders, sexuality, and classes have knowledge of the event, feel comfortable attending FMZF, and have had an opportunity to make a zine prior to and/or during the event so that each person feels zines are accessible to them and therefore feel included. It is hard work to make this happen! But it’s worth it!

How can you help?  

  • Consider tabling at FMZF! There is no formal process of applying currently. There will be eventually, most likely in July.  If you think you might be interested and want to get on the radar, or to find out more info, check out fargomoorheadzinefest.tumblr.com or send an email.
  • FMZF needs a logo and a poster. If you might are interested, please email fargomoorheadzinefest at gmail dot com.  FMZF believes all work is worthy of wages, either cash or barter, FYI.  However, this is a labor of love with a small purse, so… don’t quit your day job… ha.
  • Input toward developing a safer space statement would be very helpful. The more input, the better.  Because of a safe space can be so hard to visualize/define/implement, I think it would be helpful to keep language as actionable as possible.  As an example, instead of “respect each other’s boundaries” which leaves a person wondering “well, how do I do that?” a more actionable phrasing is “don’t touch people or their possessions without asking.”  Feel free to email suggestions or tips (again, fargomoorheadzinefest at gmail dot com) or start up a conversation on the Facebook page.

Thanks!

Joyce

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ABOUT FARGO-MOORHEAD ZINE FEST

Fargo-Moorhead Zine Fest activities will include: zine sales, zine trades, zine tutorials, kids activities and speakers.

Event is free and open to the public.  This is a kid-friendly event.  Tabling fee is 15 dollars.  A supporter has offered to pay part or all of the tabling fee for people who are unable to afford it.  Volunteers/co-planners needed.  Amazing swag bags will be your reward! 

Fargo-Moorhead Zine Fest was created with the goal of educating people of all ages about zines. In addition to being just plain awesome to read and make, zines have enormous potential for self-empowerment, raising self-esteem, healthy self-expression, and promoting literacy.

Zines are an inexpensive and easily distributable way to express ideas, showcase art or photography, or invite discussion on a topic. Zines have been around in various forms since the invention of the printing press. FMZF was founded by Joyce Hatton, Midwest Coordinator of the POC Zine Project.

Email fargomoorheadzinefest at gmail dot com for more information.

SAFER SPACE STATEMENT COMING SOON 

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DO YOU WANT TO SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT?

We are looking for representatives in every state, as well as regional  support, as we build toward the National POC Zinester & Ally Conference/Convergence. Ideally you have some experience with organizing events and building community, but experience is not required. All are welcome. Priority will be given to people of color who apply but allies are definitely welcome.

Contact poczineproject@gmail.com for more details with “regional coordinator and internship info” as the subject line.

If you are outside the U.S. and want to be a part of our emerging POCZP Global Ambassadors program, email poczineproject@gmail.com as well to stay informed as opportunities arise.

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

SCENE REPORT: MidWest Zine Fest 2013

On April 13, 2013, POCZP Midwest Coordinator Joyce Hatton attended MidWest Zine Fest for herself and on behalf of POCZP. She created this report back as part of POCZP’s advocacy to help address safer space issues and to encourage more communication/outreach between white zine fest organizers and POC in the community where the event is taking place.

image

As a result of Joyce’s recap, we have been directly in touch with MidWest Zine Fest organizers. Our advocacy is about building relationships and sharing resources—with the focus always being on the liberation of POC.

We understand the utility of call out culture but we prefer to directly address issues with people one on one. We have found this leads to more tangible positive change than simply reading someone/an entity online (although sometimes it is needed!).

Enjoy the recap and let us know what you think!

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MidWest Zine Fest 2013: The Awesome and the Not-So-Awesome

By Joyce Hatton

Joyce Hatton and Mimi Thi Nguyen at Midwest Zine Fest  2013

Joyce Hatton and POCZP member Mimi Thi Nguyen at MidWest Zine Fest 2013 (photo by Joyce Hatton)

On April 13th, 2013, I attended MidWest Zine Fest in Urbana, IL.

There were two speakers: Joe Coyle, and Kevin Hamilton. There were 21 tablers listed on the schedule, but a few more attended than were listed- myself included. I met some really interesting people and left with a huge pile of zines. I was really glad I went.  Other events that I didn’t attend included a photo scavenger hunt, a stencil workshop, a film screening, and a punk show.

THE AWESOME

  • When I walked in I saw several people wearing “radical librarian” name tags.  I <3 librarians, especially radical librarians.
  • I was delighted to see Georgi Johnston there, because I had just ordered the zine “Erik Satie was a Punk” through the mail. I was excited to read one zinester’s analysis of “punk” in a decidedly non-punk context (Satie was born in 1866 and and punk broke in 1977, as Georgi points out in the zine).  I talked briefly with Georgi and we ended up doing a zine trade.
  • Joe Coyle gave an excellent talk titled “Young People, the Prison Industrial Complex, and Writing” about work at a writing program based out of the Champaign County Juvenile Detention Center. 

Joe said: 

"The voices of young people are often neglected in discussions about the justice system and other social issues. This talk showcases some creative work by detained young people that critically addresses these topics and imagines alternatives.”

A view of the crowd during Joe Coyle's talk at Midwest Zine Fest 2013

A view of the crowd during Joe Coyle’s talk at MidWest Zine Fest 2013 (photo by Joyce Hatton) 

Coyle commented that sometimes even auxiliary prison workers get flack for being a part of the broken system that is the PIC.  As we talked we agreed there is value in the efforts of working through the system to improve the lives of incarcerated people, and value in working for radical change of the system.

Joe Coyle and Becca Sorgert at Midwest Zine Fest 2013

Joe Coyle and Becca Sorgert tabling at MidWest Zine Fest 2013 with zines made by incarcerated youth and adults (photo by Joyce Hatton)

Joe and Becca Sorgert tabled zines written by incarcerated youth and adults as a fundraiser for the Beat Within thebeatwithin.org, an nonprofit magazine that publishes works by incarcerated youth.

  • Kevin Hamilton spoke about the process of making the zine “A Place in Time: Two Paths to a Television Broadcast.” 

Kevin Hamilton speaking about the zine making process at Midwest Zine Fest 2013

Kevin Hamilton (on stage) speaking about the zine making process at MidWest Zine Fest 2013 (photo by Joyce Hatton)

Kevin’s talk was a bit hard to hear because there was no microphone and zine fest was very busy at that time.  Fortunately I was able to borrow a copy of “A Place in Time,” and I really enjoyed reading it.

Kevin was motivated to make it after seeing a video of the 1967 TV show “Public Broadcasting Lab.” In the zine, images from one of the broadcasts were used to recap a discussion amongst students and faculty talk about racism on campus. Black students are very anxious to talk about it, and the white students and faculty much less so.

[POCZP Editor Annotation]

image

FROM LAST YEAR: Chicagoian Jonas of “Cheer the Eff Up” zine tabling at MidWest Zine Fest in 2012 (in the black hat and hoodie)

Photo Source: Nicole on WeMakeZines

Update via Jonas on FB:

The final 2 issues of Cheer the Eff Up will be available this year! #5 will be finished in time for The Portland Zine Symposium in August. Issue #6 will be done in early November! 

In the meantime, you can get issues #1-3 at a few cool distros on the internets. The most recent issue #4 can be found through Mend My Dress Press or Portland Button Works

Please support those distros, because they are run by some of my favorite zinesters on the planet. But, hell, I’m not going to lie to you: if you write me a letter asking for a zine or 2, I’ll probably just mail you stuff for free. Meh. I’m a sucker for mail. Message me privately for the P.O. Box addy. 

Later gators,
-Jonas

[/POCZP Editor Annotation]

A view of the zine tablers at Midwest Zine Fest 2013

A view of the zine tablers at MidWest Zine Fest 2013 (photo by Joyce Hatton)

Participants during the stencil workshop at Midwest Zine Fest 2013

Participants during the stencil workshop at MidWest Zine Fest 2013 (photo  by Joyce Hatton)

COMMUNITY & ALLIES: Here is where Joyce raises some very important concerns that we hope sparks an ongoing and collaborative conversation between white folks who organize events and POC in the communities where they hold these events. If we don’t address these issues, POC will continue to feel unwelcome, unsafe and shut out from community. We cannot abide this. <3 Let’s change the game.

THE NOT-SO-AWESOME

  • Both Joe Coyle and Kevin Hamilton, the only two speakers, were white men.

Joe spoke for incarcerated youth, which due to the institutional racism of the justice system, many were people of color. Kevin’s zine spoke to racism on University of Illinois campus during the 1960’s and in my opinion, serves as a reminder that at any moment any one of us could be an individual that shapes history.

I appreciated Joe’s talk, and Kevin’s zine very much, but I always feel uncomfortable when white people speak about racism to a white audience (there did not appear to be people of color sitting in the audience of either talk.)

I appeared to be one of two people of color tabling zines there. There were some people of color who attended the event, which I was very glad to see. But I think it’s very important for POCs to have an active role in events, to have an active voice in presenting information. It seems like a distraction to talk about issues of race out there when your own space isn’t integrated.

I spoke with event organizer Jeanie about the lack of POCs at the event. Jeanie said that some zinesters of color were planning on coming from Chicago, but were unable to at the last minute. We talked for a bit about the need for more representation of POCs at zine events, and discussed barriers and solutions to making that happen.

POCZP stopped by Urbana-Champaign last year and put on an event at the Independent Media Center where Midwest Zine Fest was held. A few people commented to me that they had attended. While it was exciting to hear that, it was a little discouraging hear at an event with so few POCs tabling zines at MidWest Zine Fest.

  • There was a zine there about “ghost hunting” and it included an image of a “proud Native American.”

The zine said that ghosts followed Natives around, and encouraged ghost hunters to follow Natives around in order to hunt ghosts. I asked the tablers of the zine about it in and they said “it’s just a joke” and offered to give me my money back.

I told them I hadn’t bought the zine, I had just noticed it while flipping through it. They repeated “it’s just a joke,” a few times, and eventually one person said “oh, you know, our friend made that joke. She’s a member of United Tribes.”

This is even more troubling when put in the context of the still-active controversy surrounding University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign’s recently retired mascot Chief Illiniwek.

  • Dan from leaveyourbookmarks.com was wearing a tshirt that said “Chicago ain’t no sissy town.”

I approached him and had a brief conversation with him about the fact that “sissy” is a very loaded word that might make some people feel unwanted at the event, particularly given that he was tabling, which gives him the appearance of a person with power over the event. Dan was extremely polite, and offered to put on his sweatshirt to cover the shirt up.

We traded a couple of emails about our discussion a week or so later, and I think our interactions were very positive and educational for both of us.

I was very impressed with Dan’s immediate willingness to accept a new perspective, and complete lack of defensiveness.

I appreciate all the hard work the organizers did to host MidWest Zine Fest. I do not want to detract from the awesomeness of the event. What I wanted to do is give my honest perspective so that MidWest Zine Fest can grow to the be inclusive event that we all want it to be.

[/END]

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THOUGHTS FROM POCZP

POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano reached out to MidWest Zine Fest organizer Jeanie Austin this week after Joyce requested support.

Jeanie has been one of the organizers for the three MidWest Zine Fests, is a zine librarian with the UC-IMC Radical Librarians, goes to school for library science, and works with youth through Mix IT UP!

Here is the thread from our convo with Jeanie:

JOYCE’S EMAIL

Hi Jeanie and Daniela,
Jeanie, Thanks for your email.  I apologize for my lack of response.  I appreciate that you shared your concerns and experiences with me, but I was really unsure how to respond to information that I was supposed to keep secret- not just off the POCZP tumblr, but from Daniela and others. I think that growth and accountability can only happen in an open, transparent environment.  
If you do have any comments or notes that you want to go with the blog post, please let us know.  
Thanks,
 
Joyce

To her credit, Jeanie responded in a very honest way that frankly we rarely see from white zine fest organizers after this kind of interaction:

JEANIE’S RESPONSE

joyce -

i totally understand.  i felt yucky as soon as i sent that e-mail.  sorry to put you in that position.  
i think that i would add this as an addendum to the notes "if i were to offer a word of advice to organizers who want to maintain safer spaces (which we do), there needs to be a lot of talk about what that looks like in action, including a patrol team that looks around and is ready to ENFORCE safer spaces (even if it means kicking folks out)."

PART OF POCZP’S RESPONSE

Hi Jeanie,

Thanks so much for weighing in. POCZP does not use call out culture tactics because (although we understand when it is needed), we find it more productive to focus on solutions directly with folks we’re addressing. So we really appreciate your response and will include your note in the write up later today. 
I would also like to suggest the possibility of us all brainstorming by google hangout later this week or next week ways to collaborate in the midwest moving forward, with Joyce being a part of that in ways that make sense for her/work with her schedule. <3 Let me know what you think.
Warmly,
Daniela

POCZP founder Daniela and Jeanie are in touch about ongoing collaborations. Daniela, Jeanie and Joyce will be speaking about issues that came up at MidWest Zine Fest in more detail in the coming weeks so that resulting solutions can be shared publicly.

Jeanie is like many zine fest organizers—a person with a lot of other stuff going on who is passionate about building community. She reached out to us earlier in 2013, in fact, to present at MidWest Zine Fest. She also approached POCZP about a possible collaboration with a juvenile detention center in Urbana, IL and made an introduction on our behalf with Joe Coyle, who oversees the writing project.

This post isn’t about “calling out” Jeanie or anyone else at MidWest Zine Fest. We are about building community and making safer spaces for POC. 

COMMUNITY: Think about Jeanie’s comment:

to maintain safer spaces (which we do), there needs to be a lot of talk about what that looks like in action

This hits close to home for POCZP. We made our own mistakes during our first tour last year that we will not make again this year. We discussed these mistakes at Chicago Zine Fest and you can find all details within our prezi.

Despite POCZP being founded by a person of color, and being made up of POC and allies, we still made mistakes during last year’s tour that negatively affected some attendees. Some of our partner venues wouldn’t let people under 18 in, some of the venues were not wheelchair accessible and and we never created a Safer Space Policy for our volunteer event coordinators.

Even as POC, we need to examine our various privileges and how that informs the way we produce events.

So even as we ask the MidWest Zine Fest organizers to examine what went wrong and how to produce more inclusive events in the future, we continue to identify our own mistakes so that we can learn from them and then share that knowledge.

MidWest Zine Fest DID create a safer space policy. The challenge is (one that many event organizers face) how to make sure that everyone is adhering to that policy and whether or not everyone is one the same page about what the policy means

These conversations about accessibility, inclusivity and white privilege can be awkward, yes. But we need to keep having them. All the time. That is the only way positive change can occur. We need to all be a part of the solution.

Another factor to consider when assessing how the same mistakes keep happening over and over is volunteer organizer turnover rates. If there isn’t a handoff of information and a training component to onboarding new volunteers, critical information doesn’t get transferred. 

In the case of MidWest Zine Fest, there is talk that the festival may not event continue after this year (not confirmed). Jeanie herself will no longer be involved with planning the fest after this year, due to moving out of state.

But even if MidWest Zine Fest doesn’t continue, it’s likely that the past organizers will continue to create community in other ways and in other spaces. We encourage these organizers to think about how their various privileges informed their decisions that resulted some of the problematic realities of this year’s fest so that they can ensure that their next event is genuinely a safe space for POC attendees.

Check out Joyce’s roundup of zine fest posters that includes a note about MidWest Zine Fest’s problematic poster choice. 

Again, we aren’t interested in simply calling out issues and walking away. We appreciate the time and energy it takes to organize zine fests and would like to partner with MidWest Zine Fest (if it’s still around) in the future.

For additional context, here is a very positive review of MidWest Zine Fest written by a white male attendee. Here is another very positive review published by The Daily Illini.

Zine fest attendees can have very different experiences, even while being at the same event together. This is something to keep in mind when discussing what true inclusivity looks like.

COMMUNITY: How can we create a praxis - a constantly evolving framework - for zine fest organizers to reference as they build toward a goal of producing an event that is truly inclusive? We should all be sharing resources. Send us your ideas: poczineproject@gmail.com.

Also, feel free to reblog this recap and include your own thoughts and links to resources. We’ll be sure to find them and share <3

- POC Zine Project

airhornoftruthandlove:

I thought I noticed a trend regarding images of people on zine fest posters, so I googled “zine fest poster” and here is what I feel is an accurate sampling of what I saw:
Midwest Zine Fest   Appears to be a white woman.
One of the LA Zine Fest posters.  Appears to be a white woman.
Paper City in Melbourne.  Appears to be a white young woman.
One of the Brooklyn Zine Fest posters.  Appears to be a white woman.
Birmingham Zine Fest  Appears to be a large community of exclusively white people.
Belgium Feminism Fest?  Appears to be women of color represented equally with white women.
I’m not a fan of putting people on posters, for many reasons. It sends unintentional messages that often alienate people.
When a decision is made to use images of people on posters, I appreciate when there are alternate, person-free posters used as well. If I want to support the project by taking a couple of flyers or posters to give to friends, I want to be able to give them one I don’t have to apologize for. And if images of people are used on posters, I do like it when it’s cartoony, rather than representational. The picture here, from Chicago Zine Fest 2011, is adorable. It shows people somewhere with many skin tones, even purple! And all the people in this fanciful place are the same. Whether they are young or old, purple or orange, they have the same love for reading zines! 

Excellent analysis by POCZP Midwest Coordinator Joyce Hatton &lt;3
We&#8217;d love to see more white folks who organize events factor in how representations of people at their events on materiality (physical and in digital form) both welcome and alienate POC.
A facet of white privilege is just assuming everyone is OK with an entire event being represented by a white person on a poster. That is no bueno. If you want more POC to attend your events, make your promotional materials more inclusive.

airhornoftruthandlove:

I thought I noticed a trend regarding images of people on zine fest posters, so I googled “zine fest poster” and here is what I feel is an accurate sampling of what I saw:

Midwest Zine Fest
Appears to be a white woman.

One of the LA Zine Fest posters.
Appears to be a white woman.

Paper City in Melbourne.
Appears to be a white young woman.

One of the Brooklyn Zine Fest posters.
Appears to be a white woman.

Birmingham Zine Fest
Appears to be a large community of exclusively white people.

Belgium Feminism Fest?
Appears to be women of color represented equally with white women.

I’m not a fan of putting people on posters, for many reasons. It sends unintentional messages that often alienate people.

When a decision is made to use images of people on posters, I appreciate when there are alternate, person-free posters used as well. If I want to support the project by taking a couple of flyers or posters to give to friends, I want to be able to give them one I don’t have to apologize for.

And if images of people are used on posters, I do like it when it’s cartoony, rather than representational. The picture here, from Chicago Zine Fest 2011, is adorable. It shows people somewhere with many skin tones, even purple! And all the people in this fanciful place are the same. Whether they are young or old, purple or orange, they have the same love for reading zines!

Excellent analysis by POCZP Midwest Coordinator Joyce Hatton <3

We’d love to see more white folks who organize events factor in how representations of people at their events on materiality (physical and in digital form) both welcome and alienate POC.

A facet of white privilege is just assuming everyone is OK with an entire event being represented by a white person on a poster. That is no bueno. If you want more POC to attend your events, make your promotional materials more inclusive.

Follow the Fargo-Moorhead Zine Fest Tumblr!

fargomoorheadzinefest:

Want to make a zine, but not sure what to make it about? Struggling with writer’s block? Convinced that _you_ have nothing worth saying? Don’t think your art/drawing skills are up to par? Still not sure what the…

FMZF was founded by Joyce Hatton, Midwest Coordinator of the POC Zine Project. YAY!

Meet POCZP&#8217;s Midwest Coordinator Joyce Hatton!
Part of POC Zine Project&#8217;s advocacy is empowering new and seasoned zinesters of color in the U.S. (and soon worldwide) to share their stories while supporting other POC. Joyce is the first regional coordinator for POCZP and we are excited to share developments as this part of our experiment in activism and community through materiality unfolds. 
JOYCE, IN HER OWN WORDS
I was raised in South Dakota.  Being a black person raised in South Dakota is a big old can of worms.  I currently live in Moorhead, MN, border city of the better known Fargo, ND.  I lived in Philadelphia for a bit, but then the drugs got the better of me, also the fact that I didn&#8217;t get every job I applied for (the low unemployment rates of the Dakotas spoiled her) so I returned to Moorhead.  I spent time on an organic vegetable farm in California until I got cancer and returned to Moorhead.Cancer did what my ongoing mental health issues couldn&#8217;t do: it forced me to get sober and confront the trauma in my life, some of which began with being raised black in South Dakota.  Growing up as a black, non-heteronormative, radical female in small town South Dakota, I experienced some difficulties.  In addition to the overt racism, many of my (almost exclusively white) friends said and did racist things out of ignorance.  I had no idea how to handle it.  Since my mother grew up in Jim Crow-era South her advice was for me to keep my mouth shut.  For her, that was the way to stay safe.  On top of that, my family wasn&#8217;t a very safe space because they let me know there would be hell to pay if I wasn&#8217;t straight.  And I constantly argued with my mother about feminism and other ideas that I felt defined who I was.Last fall I was fairly distraught.  For various reasons I felt disillusioned and aimless. I ended up in the psych hospital, and while I was there I made a zine. It felt so self-validating, empowering, and uplifting. Shortly after making it, I discovered POCZP.  It kept me interested in zines because I found so many connections that validated what I was experiencing, and helped me learn about myself, and ideas I cared about.  I felt like I was part of a community, and I felt re-radicalized.   My goals for working with POCZP are to:
1) to build community in Fargo-Moorhead, share POC zines, and create safe spaces for POC and allies to have an honest, open sharing of ideas and experiences.
2) find ways effectively and easily share the POCZP&#8217;s mission and zine making with physically, emotionally, or ideologically isolated POC in rural areas and small towns in the Midwest.
CONNECT WITH JOYCE: 
http://airhornoftruthandlove.tumblr.com
https://www.facebook.com/TransformingMyMouthIntoAStrident
&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;
COMMUNITY: Join us in welcoming Joyce. We are excited to support zine culture and POC storytelling in the Midwest! Although our 2013 Race Riot! tour does not have a tour date in this region, our National POC Zinester &amp; Ally Conference/Convergence will be held in the Midwest. Stay tuned for details &#8230;
DO YOU WANT TO BE A COORDINATOR LIKE JOYCE?
If you are in the Midwest and want to support POCZP with Joyce, let us know! We are also looking for representatives in every state, as well as regional  support, as we build toward the National POC Zinester &amp; Ally Conference/Convergence. Ideally you have some experience with organizing events and building community, but experience is not required. All are welcome. Priority will be given to people of color who apply but allies are definitely welcome.
Contact poczineproject@gmail.com for more details with &#8220;regional coordinator&#8221; as the subject line.
If you are outside the U.S. and want to be a part of our emerging POCZP Global Ambassadors program, email poczineproject@gmail.com as well to stay informed as opportunities arise.
SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT
If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.
DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

Meet POCZP’s Midwest Coordinator Joyce Hatton!

Part of POC Zine Project’s advocacy is empowering new and seasoned zinesters of color in the U.S. (and soon worldwide) to share their stories while supporting other POC. Joyce is the first regional coordinator for POCZP and we are excited to share developments as this part of our experiment in activism and community through materiality unfolds. 

JOYCE, IN HER OWN WORDS

I was raised in South Dakota.  Being a black person raised in South Dakota is a big old can of worms.  

I currently live in Moorhead, MN, border city of the better known Fargo, ND.  I lived in Philadelphia for a bit, but then the drugs got the better of me, also the fact that I didn’t get every job I applied for (the low unemployment rates of the Dakotas spoiled her) so I returned to Moorhead.  I spent time on an organic vegetable farm in California until I got cancer and returned to Moorhead.

Cancer did what my ongoing mental health issues couldn’t do: it forced me to get sober and confront the trauma in my life, some of which began with being raised black in South Dakota.  

Growing up as a black, non-heteronormative, radical female in small town South Dakota, I experienced some difficulties.  In addition to the overt racism, many of my (almost exclusively white) friends said and did racist things out of ignorance.  I had no idea how to handle it.  Since my mother grew up in Jim Crow-era South her advice was for me to keep my mouth shut.  For her, that was the way to stay safe.  On top of that, my family wasn’t a very safe space because they let me know there would be hell to pay if I wasn’t straight.  And I constantly argued with my mother about feminism and other ideas that I felt defined who I was.

Last fall I was fairly distraught.  For various reasons I felt disillusioned and aimless. I ended up in the psych hospital, and while I was there I made a zine. It felt so self-validating, empowering, and uplifting. Shortly after making it, I discovered POCZP.  It kept me interested in zines because I found so many connections that validated what I was experiencing, and helped me learn about myself, and ideas I cared about.  I felt like I was part of a community, and I felt re-radicalized.  
 
My goals for working with POCZP are to:

1) to build community in Fargo-Moorhead, share POC zines, and create safe spaces for POC and allies to have an honest, open sharing of ideas and experiences.

2) find ways effectively and easily share the POCZP’s mission and zine making with physically, emotionally, or ideologically isolated POC in rural areas and small towns in the Midwest.

CONNECT WITH JOYCE: 

http://airhornoftruthandlove.tumblr.com

https://www.facebook.com/TransformingMyMouthIntoAStrident

———

COMMUNITY: Join us in welcoming Joyce. We are excited to support zine culture and POC storytelling in the Midwest! Although our 2013 Race Riot! tour does not have a tour date in this region, our National POC Zinester & Ally Conference/Convergence will be held in the Midwest. Stay tuned for details …

DO YOU WANT TO BE A COORDINATOR LIKE JOYCE?

If you are in the Midwest and want to support POCZP with Joyce, let us know! We are also looking for representatives in every state, as well as regional  support, as we build toward the National POC Zinester & Ally Conference/Convergence. Ideally you have some experience with organizing events and building community, but experience is not required. All are welcome. Priority will be given to people of color who apply but allies are definitely welcome.

Contact poczineproject@gmail.com for more details with “regional coordinator” as the subject line.

If you are outside the U.S. and want to be a part of our emerging POCZP Global Ambassadors program, email poczineproject@gmail.com as well to stay informed as opportunities arise.

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

COMMUNITY SUBMISSION: ‘Think About the Bubbles,’ a new zine about mental health and self care

image

ZINE TITLE: Think About the Bubbles

AUTHOR: Joyce Hatton

RELEASE DATE: January, 2013 

ORIGIN: Fargo, ND

DISTRIBUTION: ”Most of the copies will be distributed in Portland, Vancouver, Brooklyn, and a fewer number in Chicago, Minneapolis, and Lismore, Australia.”

JOYCE ON TUMBLR: http://airhornoftruthandlove.tumblr.com

ZINE DESCRIPTION FROM JOYCE:

'Think About the Bubbles' is about my struggle to keep my mental health stable. My goals are to validate the thought processes of people with mental health issues; and to give people without mental health issues a glimpse of what life is like with one.

People who have read my zine have had very strong reactions- many people have cried, but they always clarify that they aren’t sad tears. People laugh, people talk about the ways they can relate, and people talk about the larger issues of mental health. That is my ultimate goal.

What I like most about it- I love how honest and heartfelt it turned out. It’s my first zine, and I love how empowering and esteem-building it felt to make it. Thanks!

Joyce is also on Facebook.

BIO: ”I started this page when I had cancer and I knew something was changing. I told myself “I refuse to let cancer _change anything._” but I lost. Everything has changed, and I’m really happy about that. I’m on a kickassed journey.”

If you want delectable and inspiring updates like this in your news feed, subscribe to Joyce:

Things that make me feel happy: post-chemo ponytails, rigorous honesty, thinking about visiting my friend in Portland and legally going pants-less, kids laughing about butts and farts, hearing what makes other people happy…. so what makes you happy?

https://www.facebook.com/TransformingMyMouthIntoAStrident

Joyce has not yet (publicly) shared price info or online ordering instructions. If you would like access to Joyce’s zine, send a message to their Tumblr. 

<3

Editor’s Note: A “Community Submission” post results from POC folk submitting their own zine to be featured on the POC Zine Project Tumblr. If you would like to share your zine with the POC Zine Project community, here’s how to do it.

When you submit, feel free to add some background, a description of your work and art and your mission statement. If you just send us the name of your zine, we’ll simply link back to a source for purchasing it and use the language you already have on your site.

As long as the zine was created/co-created by a person of color, we will always share Community Submissions. Enjoy!

POCZP accepts anonymous submissions and zine donations from POC. Click here for submission guidelines.