POC ZINE PROJECT

Posts tagged Latino

FROM OUR IN-BOX: Mini-Comics As A Way Of Rethinking Pedagogy

"I loved your last note about POC zines and the academy. I’m a Cuban-American mini-comics cartoonist, and I’m finishing my dissertation on using mini-comics as a way of rethinking pedagogy.

I’m going to be serializing my dissertation in the form of mini-comics as I finish each chapter. I don’t know if you get a lot of emails or requests for help from POC doing academic work, but I’d be happy to help in any way (well, in non-exploitative ways).

It’s been a lonely academic experience for me with few (if any) resources for Latin@s in academia, if I could ever be a resource for anyone (in a capacity other than an object of study), please let me know. I’d also love to donate my dissertation to a digital archive for POC students and scholars when I’m finished with it.” — jarodrosello.com

Thanks so much, Jarod! We’ll be in touch.

- POCZP

Meet POCZP’s West Coast Coordinator Liz Mayorga!
Part of POC Zine Project’s advocacy is empowering new and seasoned zinesters of color in the U.S. (and soon worldwide) to share their stories while supporting other POC. Liz is the second official regional coordinator for POCZP (meet Joyce, our Midwest Coordinator, here). We are excited to share developments as this part of our experiment in activism and community through materiality unfolds. 
LIZ, IN HER OWN WORDS
Liz was born in Los Angeles, California, but moved back and forth between Mexico and LA throughout her childhood. She is the youngest of three and the only female in a traditional, Catholic, Mexican-American family. 
Though her brothers taught her how to throw a good punch, she was often confused by the strict gender roles in rural Mexican society, which told her to be passive and meek. Luckily, Los Angeles was a place where contradiction could exist, a place where you could an aggressive girl, and a Mexican Punk. LA and the influence of popular culture gave Liz an identity she could be proud of.
She moved to the Bay Area for school, but ended up falling in love with SF Zine Fest, and community of artists. They pushed her to pursue her passion for Art and Literature. 
Liz now writes fiction and non-fiction, makes comics (check out Inked), and is a working illustrator. Her inspiration comes from her crazy family and Chican@ Pop Culture. She is the Co-Director of San Francisco Zine Fest (SFZF) and is now happy to be a part of the POC Zine Project.
See Liz in action at a recent POCZP Youth Zine workshop in San Francisco, where she led activities with assistance from POCZP intern Itoro Udofia.
Liz hopes to expand and connect the DIY West Coast community and serve as a resource. She wants DIY projects (and zines) by people of color to be especially accessible to youth, because she needed community this open and empowering as a teenager. 
It is also a goal of hers to promote multi-media as a part of zine/DIY culture and expand the limits of what a zine could be, because artists, especially artists with a story to tell, need to be more visible.
Learn more about Liz here: lizmayorga.com
COMMUNITY: Join us in welcoming Liz. We are excited to support zine culture and POC storytelling on the West Coast! We will have several events in this region during the 2013 Race Riot! tour. Stay tuned for details …
DO YOU WANT TO BE A COORDINATOR LIKE LIZ?
If you want to support POCZP with Liz, other coordinators, interns and our touring members, let us know! 
We are also looking for representatives in every state, as well as regional  support, as we build toward the National POC Zinester & Ally Conference/Convergence. Ideally you have some experience with organizing events and building community, but experience is not required. All are welcome. Priority will be given to people of color who apply but allies are definitely welcome.
Contact poczineproject@gmail.com for more details with “regional coordinator” as the subject line.
If you are outside the U.S. and want to be a part of our emerging POCZP Global Ambassadors program, email poczineproject@gmail.com as well to stay informed as opportunities arise.
SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT
If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.
DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

Meet POCZP’s West Coast Coordinator Liz Mayorga!

Part of POC Zine Project’s advocacy is empowering new and seasoned zinesters of color in the U.S. (and soon worldwide) to share their stories while supporting other POC. Liz is the second official regional coordinator for POCZP (meet Joyce, our Midwest Coordinator, here). We are excited to share developments as this part of our experiment in activism and community through materiality unfolds. 

LIZ, IN HER OWN WORDS

Liz was born in Los Angeles, California, but moved back and forth between Mexico and LA throughout her childhood. She is the youngest of three and the only female in a traditional, Catholic, Mexican-American family.

Though her brothers taught her how to throw a good punch, she was often confused by the strict gender roles in rural Mexican society, which told her to be passive and meek. Luckily, Los Angeles was a place where contradiction could exist, a place where you could an aggressive girl, and a Mexican Punk. LA and the influence of popular culture gave Liz an identity she could be proud of.

She moved to the Bay Area for school, but ended up falling in love with SF Zine Fest, and community of artists. They pushed her to pursue her passion for Art and Literature.

Liz now writes fiction and non-fiction, makes comics (check out Inked), and is a working illustrator. Her inspiration comes from her crazy family and Chican@ Pop Culture. She is the Co-Director of San Francisco Zine Fest (SFZF) and is now happy to be a part of the POC Zine Project.

See Liz in action at a recent POCZP Youth Zine workshop in San Francisco, where she led activities with assistance from POCZP intern Itoro Udofia.

Liz hopes to expand and connect the DIY West Coast community and serve as a resource. She wants DIY projects (and zines) by people of color to be especially accessible to youth, because she needed community this open and empowering as a teenager.

It is also a goal of hers to promote multi-media as a part of zine/DIY culture and expand the limits of what a zine could be, because artists, especially artists with a story to tell, need to be more visible.

Learn more about Liz here: lizmayorga.com

COMMUNITY: Join us in welcoming Liz. We are excited to support zine culture and POC storytelling on the West Coast! We will have several events in this region during the 2013 Race Riot! tour. Stay tuned for details …

DO YOU WANT TO BE A COORDINATOR LIKE LIZ?

If you want to support POCZP with Liz, other coordinators, interns and our touring members, let us know!

We are also looking for representatives in every state, as well as regional  support, as we build toward the National POC Zinester & Ally Conference/Convergence. Ideally you have some experience with organizing events and building community, but experience is not required. All are welcome. Priority will be given to people of color who apply but allies are definitely welcome.

Contact poczineproject@gmail.com for more details with “regional coordinator” as the subject line.

If you are outside the U.S. and want to be a part of our emerging POCZP Global Ambassadors program, email poczineproject@gmail.com as well to stay informed as opportunities arise.

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

ZINE SPOTLIGHT: Chris Montez, teenage rockstar
CREATOR: Gabby Gamboa (who we met at the 2012 S.F. Zine Fest)
YEAR: 2011
ORIGIN: Bay Area, California, USA
DESCRIPTION: A mini-comic about obscure (but beloved) Latino pop artist Chris Montez.
In Gabby’s own words: 

My father told me a story about how growing up in the 1950s, he and all of the other Mexican American kids in his neighborhood would (falsely) boast about being related to rocker Ritchie Valens. That got me interested in researching the history and obscurities of Chicano rock, and sharing what I find.

When asked in this interview what advice she would give to aspiring comic artists and zinesters, Gabrielle Gamboa suggested the following:

Don’t limit yourself by studying only one technique or medium. Practice drawing from observation. Learn about art from before you were born.

Chris Montez isn’t presently listed on Gabby’s Etsy shop, but contact her if you’re interested in purchasing.

Interested in  learning more about some of the other selections in our physical archive? Click here.

ZINE SPOTLIGHT: Chris Montez, teenage rockstar

CREATOR: Gabby Gamboa (who we met at the 2012 S.F. Zine Fest)

YEAR: 2011

ORIGIN: Bay Area, California, USA

DESCRIPTION: A mini-comic about obscure (but beloved) Latino pop artist Chris Montez.

In Gabby’s own words:

My father told me a story about how growing up in the 1950s, he and all of the other Mexican American kids in his neighborhood would (falsely) boast about being related to rocker Ritchie Valens. That got me interested in researching the history and obscurities of Chicano rock, and sharing what I find.

When asked in this interview what advice she would give to aspiring comic artists and zinesters, Gabrielle Gamboa suggested the following:

Don’t limit yourself by studying only one technique or medium. Practice drawing from observation. Learn about art from before you were born.

Chris Montez isn’t presently listed on Gabby’s Etsy shop, but contact her if you’re interested in purchasing.

Interested in  learning more about some of the other selections in our physical archive? Click here.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: Brown Queen: Latina Voices of the 21st Century

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TITLE: Muchacha

CREATOR: Daisy Salinas

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: March 1, 2013

Muchacha: A quarterly fanzine that seeks to promote the “F” word feminism, encourage involvement in the DIY music/art community & inspire participation in grassroots activism.

DETAILS FROM DAISY

The theme for the upcoming issue #5 (Spring, 13’) of my fanzine Muchacha is “Brown Queen: Latina Voices of the 21st Century”. I am calling out to Latina/Chicana/Hispanic identified women worldwide to contribute their voices though an array of mediums including poetry, essays, art, comics, etc. I want this issue to serve as a time capsule for future generations of Brown women. Let our voices be heard and let us pick up the pieces and continue the lessons of our foremothers. As Gloria Anzaldúa brilliantly said: “I will no longer be made to feel ashamed of existing. I will have my voice: Indian, Spanish, white. I will have my serpent’s tongue - my woman’s voice, my sexual voice, my poet’s voice. I will overcome the tradition of silence.”

Join me in overcoming the traditions of silence. To submit your contributions contact me at Riotgrrrl56@yahoo.com with “Brown Queen” as the subject. Deadline for submissions is March 1st, 2013.

La tema de mi próxima edición #5 (Primavera, 13’) di me revistilla Muchacha es “Brown Queen: Latina Voices of the 21st Century” (Reina Morena: Voces Latinas Del Siglo 21). Estoy llamando a las mujeres identificadas como Latina/Chicana/Hispana por todo el mundo para contribuir sus voces a través de una variedad de medios incluyendo poesía, ensayos, arte, cómicos, etc. Quiero que esta edición sirva como una cápsula del tiempo para las futuras generaciones de mujeres Latinas. Deje que nuestras voces se escuchen, y deje que nosotros recogemos los pedazos y seguir las lecciones de nuestras antepasadas. Como Gloria Anzaldúa brillantemente dijo: “Ya no mi haré sentir vergüenza por existir. Tendré mi voz: India, Español, blanca. Tendré mi lengua de serpiente - la voz de mi mujer, mi voz sexual, la voz de mi poeta. Voy a superar la tradición del silencio.”

Acompáñeme en el vencimiento de las tradiciones de silencio. Para enviar sus contribuciones póngase en contacto conmigo Riotgrrrl56@yahoo.com con “Reina Morena” en el título. Fecha límite para submisions es Marzo 1st, 2013.

muchachafanzine.tumblr.com

wemakezines.ning.com/profile/DaisySalinas

——-

Editor’s Note: A “Community Submission” post results from POC folk submitting their own zine to be featured on the POC Zine Project Tumblr. If you would like to share your zine with the POC Zine Project community, here’s how to do it.

When you submit, feel free to add some background, a description of your work and art and your mission statement. If you just send us the name of your zine, we’ll simply link back to a source for purchasing it and use the language you already have on your site.

As long as the zine was created/co-created by a person of color, we will always share Community Submissions. Enjoy!

POCZP accepts anonymous submissions and zine donations from POC. Click here for submission guidelines.

COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT: People of the Sun Distro Q&A for L.A. Zine Fest 2013

We’ve been in touch with Isidro Fox at People of the Sun Distro since last September. Fox sent their zines to be included in the POCZP archive last year and we recently signal boosted their call for more poc zines to share at this year’s L.A. Zine Fest.

Check out L.A. Zine Fest’s Q&A with Fox. Here’s an excerpt:

What’s the best thing that ever happened to you because of zines?
It seemed like every time I wanted to completely give up on writing, I’d randomly get an email from someone talking about how great my writing was, and how they’re surprised I’m not a real hot-shot yet. I always find that pretty funny, being that I honestly go through a lot of moments where I think what I’m creating is utter crap, and yet there are these people who think I’m the best and keep asking me to publish a book or something because the small amount of writing they’ve seen is a real tease. There’s also those people who find my writing through these zines, tell me I really cheered ‘em up, and though I know that can’t always last forever, I’m still glad I was somehow able to pick-up someone’s chin – if only for a night.

POC Zine Project will be at L.A. Zine Fest on Feb. 17! Visit our table and attend/support our multimedia reading and discussion at the fest. We look forward to building with you, people of earth! More details coming soon … <3

I think the idea of collecting and gathering history because we want to preserve it and share is crucial, especially when we want to hold organizers and writers accountable for the choices they make in how they write about a community like zinesters or organizers when they plan events.

We have been around since the beginning and we are very diverse group writing about all kinds of things and not just race. And there is no excuse not to be aware of this! Also we’ve done some pretty amazing things! - Tomas Moniz, Rad Dad zine

POC Zine Project Q & A with Tomas Moniz

When we found out that Tomas was one of the organizers for this year’s East Bay Alternative Book and Zine Fest (going down TOMORROW, Dec 8!), we decided to ask him a few questions about his history with the fest, thoughts on the relevance of Riot Grrrl, the future of Rad Dad, and more. Enjoy!

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POCZP: How did you get involved with the East Bay Alternative Book and Zine Fest and why did you decide to take the lead on organizing this year’s fest? What does your role entail?

Tomas: MK Chavez, a bad ass chicana poet, and I were at the SF Zine fest and we realized so many of the tablers were from Oakland and Berkeley and other parts of the East Bay, so we said we should do something 6 months from the SF zine fest. And we did.

We wanted a space to highlight the local writing community particularly because we like to get and read zines but mostly so we could create a community here, get people to mingle, talk, and as a result I think there has been a strong growth in writing groups, monthly literary readings and events!

We each took leadership responsibilities and each year new people step up to help get the work done!

POCZP: You started Rad Dad after becoming a parent at 20, right? In terms of radical/DIY resources for dads since that time, what have you seen emerge that you’re excited about and what is in store for the future of Rad Dad zine?

How long to do you plan on continuing it and would you hand it off to someone else, or will it just stop when you stop?

imageTomas: Funny you should ask about handing it off; I have been contemplating the transition because all along I’ve wanted Rad Dad to be about community rather than an individual or me.

I also though think it’s important as a father whose gone through it to pick up some of the work that new parents often times simply can’t do because of the differing demands on their time; I like to think of Rad Dad as a bridge, as the light at the end of the tunnel, reminding especially new parents that you will get through the struggle and you can come out a better person!

POCZP: You have two teenage daughters. Is Riot Grrrl something they relate to/have explored? Also, what is their relationship to zines and how do you encourage them in that regard?

Tomas: The definitely have their own musical tastes and interests. They know riot grrrl and know the music but it certainly is not theirs; they have their own likes and sometimes those likes are pretty problematic, but what I think is so important is that we can talk about those issues, talk about that contradictory place we all find ourselves in from time to time in which you like something but recognize its contradictions, its flaws and from that make informed choices.

They don’t make their own zines but they read them and they come with me to the events…

POCZP: What are your top 5 tips for someone who wants to start a zine fest in their town?

Tomas: Call a meeting and get started…I think you really only need like two or three people. Start off with just getting a day and twenty tables and a space. Don’t try to do too much at first.

Later you can add speakers and workshops. But I also encourage you to try something different — make it a skill share, do it at a park, drop-in style, remember the point is community not commerce.

Keep it affordable for people; reach out to people and ask for help or what you need; you’d be surprised how often you get it.

POCZP: What are your top 10 favorite zines right now (can be old, new, doesn’t matter)?

Tomas:  [provided a list]

• Wonder & Wander by Annie Yu — so awesome it’s this mix of her finding a used typewriter, how to gude for using a typwriter, maps of walking the streets of San Francisco

• Boob Juice by Mindi Jackson – a young mama wrestling with big questions and a little baby

• Dreams of Donuts by Heather Wreckage – a really strong comic zine dealing with occupy Oakland and other issues

 Kerbloom by Artnoose — just plain wonderful and consistent

• Book of Ladders by Jacks Ashley McNamara — a beautiful mix of essays and poems dealing with class and identity

• RACE (revolutionary anti-authoritarians of color) — a one-time zine from early 00s dealing with race and anarchism!

• Illegal Voices — came out of the APOC community with so many powerful essays

• Tenacious: Writing by Incarcerated Women edited by — Vikki Law’s zine for and by women prisoners

• The Nerve of These People by Anna Quinonez — drawings of revolutionary women

• Without Words & Without Kneeling by Tomas Moniz – a serialized zine novella about an anarchist study group

POCZP: You said you’ve been following POC Zine Project for a while. What did you think when you first heard about it, and why do you think it’s important (if you do at all)?

Tomas: I was and am excited. I think the idea of collecting and gathering history because we want to preserve it and share is crucial especially when we want to hold organizers and writers accountable for the choices they make in how they write about a community like zinesters or organizers when they plan events.

We have been around since the beginning and we are very diverse group writing about all kinds of things and not just race. And there is no excuse not to be aware of this! Also we’ve done some pretty amazing things!

POCZP: Some zinesters of color have had experiences with feeling unwelcome in zine spaces/DIY communities. Has that been your experience at all?

Tomas: My experience of feeling kind of isolated rather than unwelcome was more in the activist/anarchist scene here in the Bay. It’s was very white but that has been changing.

But I realize my privilege in living in a very diverse region so there has always been other zinesters and also there has always been support. When we felt there was an issue, we seemed to quickly get together and address it.

But I still get letters from parents who live in very homogenous communities and that is why I still do zines, I still write letters, I still work to gather voices in Rad Dad form those who don’t always get a chance to tell their story: parents of color, young parents, queer or trans parents because it’s important to let others know they are not alone.

- Q & A by POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano

Today&#8217;s snail mail arrival: Todo Sobre Mi Madre zine!
Author: Rachel Casiano Hernandez!
Publish date: April 2012
Location: East Coast/Boston area
Description: &#8220;As the name suggests, this zine is &#8216;all about my mother. It&#8217;s a reference to Pedro Almodovar&#8217;s film by the same name, which he dedicated to his mother. 
On International Women&#8217;s Day this year I started making a zine to honor my badass working class queer ally Puerto Rican mother. Todo Sobre Mi Madre is what came out of that. It includes pictures, stories about her coming to the United States, and excerpts from letters we wrote back and forth. The title is in Spanish but the rest of the zine is in English. 
I hope you read this and think about awesome mothers in your life - be they your own mother(s), your partner(s), grandmother(s), sister(s), or friend(s).
16 pages, b&amp;w, half-size.I&#8217;m also up for trades if you have zines - let me know!&#8221;
Keywords: Puerto Rican, WOC, POC, biography, geopolitical context, identity, coming out, LGBTQ, queer
Where to buy Todo Sobre Mi Madre: Etsy!
Recently we shared that Rachel donated funds to support the POC Zine Project tour. We appreciate her support and her efforts, as one individual, to support DIY culture through her zine-making as a woman of color! WOOO! &lt;3

Today’s snail mail arrival: Todo Sobre Mi Madre zine!

Author: Rachel Casiano Hernandez!

Publish date: April 2012

Location: East Coast/Boston area

Description: “As the name suggests, this zine is ‘all about my mother. It’s a reference to Pedro Almodovar’s film by the same name, which he dedicated to his mother. 

On International Women’s Day this year I started making a zine to honor my badass working class queer ally Puerto Rican mother. Todo Sobre Mi Madre is what came out of that. It includes pictures, stories about her coming to the United States, and excerpts from letters we wrote back and forth. The title is in Spanish but the rest of the zine is in English. 

I hope you read this and think about awesome mothers in your life - be they your own mother(s), your partner(s), grandmother(s), sister(s), or friend(s).

16 pages, b&w, half-size.

I’m also up for trades if you have zines - let me know!”

Keywords: Puerto Rican, WOC, POC, biography, geopolitical context, identity, coming out, LGBTQ, queer

Where to buy Todo Sobre Mi Madre: Etsy!

Recently we shared that Rachel donated funds to support the POC Zine Project tour. We appreciate her support and her efforts, as one individual, to support DIY culture through her zine-making as a woman of color! WOOO! <3