POC ZINE PROJECT

Posts tagged Legacy Series

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

From POC Zine Project:
ALERT: We are looking for folks who can tell us more about LA RAZA: NEWS & POLITICAL THOUGHT OF THE‪ CHICANO‬ STRUGGLE (1975) (see sample issue below):- Where are the founders today? What are they doing?- Where are some of the contributors today? What are they doing?- Which movements were inspired by/relied on this publication?POCZP intern Cata has reached out to some folks but no response so far. Help us do critical ‪#‎legacyseries‬ work by sharing whatever info you have!  Send to poczineproject@gmail.com with subject “LA RAZA”READ NOW

Thanks for the signal boost <3 We really appreciate it. We’ve received multiple leads from Facebook commenters within the last 24 hours (where we originally shared this inquiry) and are planning our follow up strategy now. This will be a publication we explore in-depth through our Legacy Series. 
You can actually read it right now if you want to (we added it to our public digitized & digital zine library)!

More info coming soon … <3

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

From POC Zine Project:

ALERT: We are looking for folks who can tell us more about LA RAZA: NEWS & POLITICAL THOUGHT OF THE‪ CHICANO‬ STRUGGLE (1975) (see sample issue below):

- Where are the founders today? What are they doing?
- Where are some of the contributors today? What are they doing?
- Which movements were inspired by/relied on this publication?

POCZP intern Cata has reached out to some folks but no response so far. Help us do critical ‪#‎legacyseries‬ work by sharing whatever info you have!  Send to poczineproject@gmail.com with subject “LA RAZA”

READ NOW

Thanks for the signal boost <3 We really appreciate it. We’ve received multiple leads from Facebook commenters within the last 24 hours (where we originally shared this inquiry) and are planning our follow up strategy now. This will be a publication we explore in-depth through our Legacy Series. 

You can actually read it right now if you want to (we added it to our public digitized & digital zine library)!

More info coming soon … <3

Meet POCZP’s Chief Fanalyst for the Legacy Series: Julia B. aka Ju!

Julia B., or Ju: First Official Fanalyst to participate in the POC Zine Project's Legacy Series

NAME: Julia B. (also goes by Ju)

ROLE: Chief Fanalyst for POC Zine Project’s Legacy Series

REGION: East Coast (Brooklyn), USA

COMMUNITY: Ju has been a POCZP member since the beginning. You’ll be seeing more of their contributions manifest on this Tumblr and in other digital and physical spaces very soon …. <3

IN JU’S OWN WORDS

Hi there. I’m Julia B., or Ju (if we’re being informal, which suits me fine), and I’m the first Official (and Chief) Fanalyst to participate in the POC Zine Project’s Legacy Series!

I’m very excited to be part of this series, and I’m looking forward to sharing more about the first Legacy Series selection: Fire!!: A Quarterly Devoted to the Younger Negro Artists, published in 1926. I should probably begin by explaining what my role will be.

fan: As in, amateur. I’m not a professional historian, just an enthusiastic history lover with library access. Whether it’s sci-fi fans swapping self-written stories through the mail, or specialized distros offering up all manner of self-published work at concerts, zine readings and the like, zine culture has consistently been defined by its place outside of the traditional publishing world. Keeping that in mind, the folks writing this series are taking part because we genuinely love the works we’re talking about, and want to share those works as laypeople in an accessible way.

analyst: I’ll be doing a close read and giving background details about the magazine, page by page. Sort of like “Pop-Up Video” but in written form.

Graphic for Ju's Chief Fanalyst bio In lieu of elaborate on-location choreography, I’ll be taking you further into not only the text of Fire!!, but also the world in which it was published—from the author’s contemporaries to the neighborhood in which their office was situated, and more. Ideally, by the time you’re done checking out what I’ve got for you, you’ll have music to listen to, visual artists to check out, books you’ll want to look for. Like I said, I’m enthusiastic about history, and my goal is to make sure that you’re just as thrilled about learning more as I was doing the research.

So why exactly am I so thrilled to be working on Fire!! in particular? Well, as a literature fan, I’ve loved Zora Neale Hurston’s, Langston Hughes’, and Countee Cullen’s writing for years. For many, those names might be the most familiar in the list of contributors to Fire!!, and I’m sure a lot of you out there are already fans of their work. But what of the other contributors alluded to in the “younger negro artists” of the magazine’s title? I see this as a chance for those who are more familiar with the writers in this publication to learn more about the visual artists who contributed, and vice versa, while I take a look at the perspectives that link them all together.

I’m also excited because Fire!! was controversial in its time. The contributors were not interested in perpetuating the politics of respectability. They did not create the magazine to keep in step with the artists of generations before them. In short, they were uncomfortable because they refused to conform to more (Black middle-class) palatable sensibilities.

I mean, check out some of the stuff people were saying when this little magazine out of Harlem made its way into print:

Rean Graves of the Baltimore Afro-American [newspaper] was incensed by the magazine and wrote in his review, “I have just tossed the first issue of Fire!! into the fire.” Benjamin Brawley went so far as to say that if the U.S. Post Office found out about Thurman’s “Cordelia the Crude,” the magazine might be barred from the mail.[1]

Pretty strong reactions to a fledgling publication! The contributors wrote about touchy subjects such as colorism among Black Americans and prostitution. They made deliberate use of Black American vernacular, in an effort to make the voices of their works ring true to the people they represented. And pissed off a bunch of uptight people in the process, even though only one issue of Fire!! was ever published. It’s easy to think of “cutting edge” in the present tense, but in exploring the magazine, we get the chance to check out what the Black American nonconformists of 1926 had to say, and what value those messages hold for us in the present day.

Anyway, enough out of me! I’m looking forward to talking with you further… hopefully we can start a cool conversation (or several) about this classic work. Stay tuned!

[1]: Patton, Venetria K., and Maureen Honey. “The Harlem Renaissance.” Oxford African American Studies Center: Guest Scholars. Oxford University Press. Web. <http://www.oxfordaasc.com/public/featureded/guest_5.jsp>

DO YOU WANT TO BE A FANALYST FOR THE LEGACY SERIES?

The only criteria is that you have to be a person of color! Submit here and tell us a little about yourself. Please include links to some writing samples. Good luck!

White allies: There are other ways for you to support the Legacy Series. Please email daniela@dcapmedia.com for details.

ABOUT THE LEGACY SERIES

Kicking off with FIRE!!, POC Zine Project will make zines by people of color created from the 1700s-1990s available to read and share.

Every Friday (Editor’s note: date pushed to February), you will find a legacy zine by a person of color on poczineproject.tumblr.com. We will share more details in 2013.

WHY WE ARE FOCUSING ON LEGACY ZINES

People of color in the U.S. have produced independent publications (zines) for decades. Many of these zines were political in nature, creating cracks in the lens of white supremacy that shaped (and continues to inform) popular culture and legislation.

These zines were new maps to our liberation, countering the negative propaganda of what people of color looked like, thought and were capable of achieving.

We want the world to know about these legacy zines, so we are going to archive and share them to the best of our ability.

We look forward to partnering with distros, academic spaces, libraries, anti-authoritarian collectives, literary journals, bloggers and more to share the Legacy Series.

“NEW” ZINESTERS: We will still share information about new and upcoming zines by people of color :) Please continue to submit your zines to the archive.

ABOUT THE RACE RIOT! TOUR

POC Zine Project held its first Race Riot! Tour in 2012, producing 20 events in 14 cities, which included speaking engagements at six universities. Click here to view photos from the POC Zine Project: 2012 Race Riot! Tour tour finale at Death By Audio in Brooklyn and access all the tour stop recaps.

We will be taking the Race Riot! Tour through 14 more cities in 2013. Stay tuned!

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

Meet POCZP’s first Legacy Series intern: Itoro Udofia!

EDIT: Itoro Udofia: First dedicated intern for POCZP's Legacy Series (Spring 2013)

NAME: Itoro Udofia

ROLE: First dedicated intern for the POC Zine Project’s Legacy Series

REGION: West Coast, USA

COMMUNITY: Join us in welcoming Itoro! You’ll be seeing her contributions manifest on this Tumblr and in other digital and physical spaces very soon …. <3

Bio: Itoro is a first generation writer, artist, and educator of Nigerian origin living in the Bay Area. She develops programs for youth of color (Youth Programs Associate at the Museum of the African Diasporawhere they have a space to honor their histories and thrive. You can find her writings on Your World News, People of Color Organize, Rain and Thunder: A Radical Feminist Journal, Womanist Musings, and her own blog Thoughts of my Mind. Her writings focus on the intersections and dynamics of race, class, gender, power, survival/healing and education.

She also teaches an African History course and when she is not doing that, she works closely with a community organization dear to her heart, working to abolish the school to prison pipeline and hearing the youth speak their truth to move to action. She is happy to be a Bay Area resident and feels like here, she has found a bit of peace and a bit of home!

Itoro’s excited to be an intern with the POC Zine Project because it is a collective that uplifts and cares about what people of color have to say and acknowledges what they have always said.

Some texts that furthered her political consciousness and commitment to uplifting the voices of POC and their struggles are The Revolution Starts at Home, This Bridge Called My Back and Steve Biko’s I Write What I Like: Selected Writings. All these zines and texts named what it means to speak out from the margins and hold to ones principle in building a world that includes us all, and calls for a life of love and continued struggle in ALL our spaces, seen and unseen. Moreover, with many people coming out from the margins, she did not feel alone.

Ultimately, Itoro hopes to be a part of a larger community committed to making our written word available, accessible and visible. Other perks to the internship are gaining more knowledge and organizing with radical zinesters. As an intern, she hopes to further her knowledge about zine culture and help get our Voices out. She is excited and ready to begin this journey and is happy to call the POC Zine Project her media home.

COMMUNITY: Learn more about POCZP internship & volunteer opportunities here. We are still accepting applications for the Summer and Fall sessions. 

IN ITORO’S OWN WORDS

Here are some excerpt from her application that are important to share:

Zine culture, specifically the material production of our knowledge is important to me because our voices are often co-opted, misused or completely erased in the literary canon. I have experienced this dangerous and painful trend most profoundly as an educator within the context of radical and progressive education. Save for bell hooks, Sonia nieto, Michele Foster and a few other people of color directly explaining the intricacies of power and privilege as a teacher of color, outlining a liberatory pedagogy through navigating a hostile terrain and offering something invaluable to the field through articulating underlying race, class and gender dynamics, it was difficult to fully relate to radical literature. I found that much of its thought and analysis was filtered through a white liberal/radical context. Even the class analysis was lacking because the white elephant in the room, white supremacy, was not directly dealt with. These power dynamics alone, the dynamics of who gets listened to, who controls the written word, who controls the publishing house, the way information gets told is what fuels my commitment to writing and working with people of color to have complete autonomy over their material.

… The POC Zine project is necessary at this particular time where knowledge and overall experiences are actively ignored.  Centering people of color’s material contributions as a source of  is important, and is a part of honoring a larger history of people who kept going in spite of these hurdles.  

SOME OF ITORO’S WRITING

In a Quiet Place, A Radical Profeminist (Fall 2012)  

In a Quiet Place, The Black Feminist Manifesto (Fall 2012)

In a Quiet Place, Your World News (Fall 2012)  

Missy Anne’s on the lookout for me, Your World News (Summer 2012)  

And When You Leave, Take your Pictures with you, Your World News (Spring 2012) 

Black Power, Leadership and Privilege, Your World News (Winter 2012)

Shedding the Tears, Looking Back, Moving Forward, People of Color Organize (Winter 2012) 

Conversations with a Student Teacher of Color, Womanist Musings (Fall 2010) 

ABOUT THE LEGACY SERIES

Kicking off with FIRE!!, POC Zine Project will make zines by people of color created from the 1700s-1990s available to read and share.

Every Friday (Editor’s note: date pushed to February), you will find a legacy zine by a person of color on poczineproject.tumblr.com. We will share more details in 2013.

WHY WE ARE FOCUSING ON LEGACY ZINES

People of color in the U.S. have produced independent publications (zines) for decades. Many of these zines were political in nature, creating cracks in the lens of white supremacy that shaped (and continues to inform) popular culture and legislation.

These zines were new maps to our liberation, countering the negative propaganda of what people of color looked like, thought and were capable of achieving.

We want the world to know about these legacy zines, so we are going to archive and share them to the best of our ability.

We look forward to partnering with distros, academic spaces, libraries, anti-authoritarian collectives, literary journals, bloggers and more to share the Legacy Series.

"NEW" ZINESTERS: We will still share information about new and upcoming zines by people of color :) Please continue to submit your zines to the archive.

ABOUT THE RACE RIOT! TOUR

POC Zine Project held its first Race Riot! Tour in 2012, producing 20 events in 14 cities, which included speaking engagements at six universities. Click here to view photos from the POC Zine Project: 2012 Race Riot! Tour tour finale at Death By Audio in Brooklyn and access all the tour stop recaps.

We will be taking the Race Riot! Tour through 14 more cities in 2013. Stay tuned!

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

You can also send well-concealed cash or a check! Email daniela@dcapmedia.com for details or if you have questions.

Info about the poverty zine series: http://bit.ly/RLVTVt

DONATION SPOTLIGHT: Helen Luu’s original flat for How to Stage a Coup: An Insurrection of the Underground Liberation Army (2000)

Big thanks to Helen Luu for donating her original flat to POC Zine Project.

POCZP is in the process of scanning and will make this zine available as a free digital download and embed. We will have copies for sale and trade at all our events in 2013.

If you are interested in helping to distro this zine and want early access to the digital version, send us a message.

If you’re not familiar with Helen Luu , check out Mimi’s interview with her shortly after the zine’s release. Here’s an excerpt:

HeartAttaCk columnist and activist Helen Luu recently edited a compilation zine called How To Stage A Coup, aimed at creating a dialogue among people of color involved in subcultural pursuits (including punk rock) around race, racism and politics.

Contributors like Lauren Martin (You Might As Well Live, Quantify), Lynn Hou (Cyanide), Celia Prez (I Dreamed I Was Assertive), Elizabeth Martinez (Colorlines) and Vincent Chung address a wide variety of issues from organizing and identity politics, to activist dynamics and punk rock betrayals.

What does it mean to look at the photographs of Third World suffering on the covers of grindcore records? What does it mean to talk about “pride”? Where was the “color” in Seattle/WTO? What comes first – “being brown or being famous”?

The contributors to this compilation ask important questions that need asking, again and again, and Helen Luu brings it all together.

Interview by Mimi Nguyen.

How did HTSAC come together, conceptually and practically?

I’ve been doing zines for a few years now and because of this, have also read a lot of zines and corresponded with lots of people. I started noticing that some zine kids have some really fucked-up notions about issues like racism and that zine culture, like punk rock, is mostly this sea of white – not only in terms of people but also in terms of ideas and ideology and perspectives and that sort of thing.

At the same time though, I would sometimes come across amazing zines by kick-ass people of color with really great critical commentary on race. One day, into my lap fell Evolution of a Race Riot, which was this compilation zine put together over a number of years by you, and which was filled with writings and art by some amazing people of color. It was hands down the most inspiring and empowering zine I had ever read, because this was the first thing I had ever encountered that was about us, by us, and for us, on our own terms.

And it was this collection of voices from all over North America who might not even have otherwise known about each other were it not for the zine.

I am proud to say that HTSAC is in the spirit of Evolution of a Race Riot because our fire ain’t gonna die down! To all our misguided friends and enemies: be very very afraid. As people of color, we need to build on and continue positive projects like Evolution of a Race Riot.

I felt that it was important that HTSAC be by, for, and about people of color because a lot of us want to engage in a different kind of discourse. A lot of us are really sick and tired of constantly having to play the role of “educator” to white people who just don’t get it, and who instead accuse us of “reverse discrimination,” of being “too angry,” of being “ungrateful immigrants” because they feel that their positions of white privilege and power might be threatened.

So anyway, I just started putting out the word about the zine, making the call for contributions, and when I finally decided to get my shit together and stop putting it off, I started nagging people more for submissions and they just started to pour in.

Click here for the rest of Mimi’s interview with Helen, and check out her DJ projects as MissRuckus. If you’re in or near Toronto on the 25th, drop by Helen’s birthday bash at KITCH!

How to stage a coup

- Portland, OR, 2010: Shotgun Seamstress creator Osa Atoe holds up a copy of How to Stage a Coup, while meeting with Daniela for the first time during the Portland Zine Symposium. POCZP tabled at the fest and sponsored Osa’s zine release party.

Photo by POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano.

Legacy Series update and call for support

Community,

Due to many factors, we will be rolling out FIRE!! in segments as we continue with scanning. We’ll share the first section soon.  We’ll also make the full version available as one item at the end of the scanning process. Thank you for your patience.

POCZP is a 100% volunteer, DIY entity and we do our best to create as much change — and provide as much inspiration as possible — with very few resources.

HOW TO SUPPORT THE LEGACY SERIES

If you would like to contribute funds toward Legacy Series research and production, here’s how:

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

You can also send well-concealed cash or a check! Email daniela@dcapmedia.com for details or if you have questions.

We are also still looking for volunteers to help with reviewing and providing historical context/research for each legacy zine.

Use the submission form and include the following information (none of it will be published publicly, this is for internal use only):

- Name (anonymous volunteering won’t work at this time)

- Location (city and state)

- Email to contact you

- Any initial questions you may have

- Approximate hours per week you can devote toward reviewing legacy zines and researching topics

- A brief history of your contributions to zine culture and/or your academic/volunteer/professional work

- Links to three writing samples (they don’t have to be about zines)

If you’re not a regular Tumblr user and don’t want to apply though the form, email your info to daniela@dcapmedia.com.

Thank you for your support. If you don’t have time to volunteer or funds to contribute, please help the cause by signal boosting this call for support.

<3

- POC Zine Project

Legacy Series Update
Hi y&#8217;all! We&#8217;re excited to share FIRE!!, an African American literary magazine published in 1926 during the Harlem Renaissance. Only one issue exists. The original title read Fire!! A Quarterly Devoted to the Younger Negro Artists.
We had planned on sharing a digitized version today, along with some surprises, but shipping delays made it impossible to scan/organize this post in time for today&#8217;s reveal. 
But we have Fire!! at POCZP HQ in the South Bronx right now, and we&#8217;ll share it ASAP.
In the meantime, we&#8217;ll roll out another legacy zine over the weekend &lt;3
For more information about the Legacy Series, click here.
Happy Friday!
- POC Zine Project

Legacy Series Update

Hi y’all! We’re excited to share FIRE!!, an African American literary magazine published in 1926 during the Harlem Renaissance. Only one issue exists. The original title read Fire!! A Quarterly Devoted to the Younger Negro Artists.

We had planned on sharing a digitized version today, along with some surprises, but shipping delays made it impossible to scan/organize this post in time for today’s reveal. 

But we have Fire!! at POCZP HQ in the South Bronx right now, and we’ll share it ASAP.

In the meantime, we’ll roll out another legacy zine over the weekend <3

For more information about the Legacy Series, click here.

Happy Friday!

- POC Zine Project

- our face when someone says that people of color didn&#8217;t make zines in the 1990s or earlier and weren&#8217;t involved with riot grrrl
- our face when people &#8220;forget&#8221; to include zines by poc in their research, public collections, publications and best-of lists
- our face when zine-selling bookstores/infoshops don&#8217;t carry any zines by POC
CLAP-TALK CAT KNOWS WHAT&#8217;S UP &lt;3
We&#8217;re excited to share the Legacy Series in 2013: independent publications by POC from the 1700s-1990s.
Zines, one-sheets, pamphlets, self-published magazines and more. Stay turned.
- POC Zine Project

- our face when someone says that people of color didn’t make zines in the 1990s or earlier and weren’t involved with riot grrrl

- our face when people “forget” to include zines by poc in their research, public collections, publications and best-of lists

- our face when zine-selling bookstores/infoshops don’t carry any zines by POC

CLAP-TALK CAT KNOWS WHAT’S UP <3

We’re excited to share the Legacy Series in 2013: independent publications by POC from the 1700s-1990s.

Zines, one-sheets, pamphlets, self-published magazines and more. Stay turned.

- POC Zine Project

POC Zine Project announces 'Legacy Series': zines by POC from 2000s - 1700s

THE LEGACY SERIES

Kicking off with FIRE!!, POC Zine Project will make zines by people of color created from the 1700s-2000s available to read and share.

In 2014, you will find a legacy zine by a person of color featured on poczineproject.tumblr.com every month. We will share more details in early 2014.

DEFINING A ‘LEGACY’ ZINE

POC Zine Project defines a legacy zine as an independent publication created by a person of color (or group led by POC) during the 1700s - 2000.

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines legacy as the following:

1
: a gift by will especially of money or other personal property : bequest
2
: something transmitted by or received from an ancestor or predecessor or from the past <the legacy of the ancient philosophers>

Zines by people of color from the 1700s-2000 tell many stories that weren’t shared by publishers and newspapers of their day. These zines aren’t any less valuable because they weren’t created as a biproduct of the Riot Grrrl movement, or didn’t have sci-fi themes (although some did!).

RIOT GRRRL DOESN’T OWN ZINE CULTURE

Riot Grrrl generated a wealth of inspiring and informative zines from the 1990s to today, but that isn’t the only story. In direct response to the erasure that POC have experienced in the retelling and whitewashing of punk, feminist, and indie publishing histories, POC Zine Project will spend 2013 and beyond sharing zines by people of color that tell us more about our roles in these movements and beyond.

POC Zine Project is an experiment in activism and community through materiality. We are for creating new mappings of our consciousness in opposition to institutionalized oppression. 

Through the Legacy Series, we will celebrate the zines that were created by people of color to foster awareness, community, revolution and liberation in all its forms.

Since our access at this time is to legacy zines created in the U.S., that is what the bulk of the initial release will be. POCZP  was founded in the U.S. but that isn’t our focus. We are actively seeking legacy zines created by POC outside the U.S. and will share those as we acquire them.

WHY WE ARE FOCUSING ON LEGACY ZINES

People of color (men and women) in the U.S. have produced independent publications (zines) since the 1700s. Many of these zines were political in nature, creating cracks in the lens of white supremacy that shaped popular culture.

These zines were new maps to our liberation, countering the negative propaganda of what people of color looked like, thought and were capable of achieving.

We want the world to know about these legacy zines, so we are going to archive and share them to the best of our ability.

We look forward to partnering with distros, academic spaces, libraries, anti-authoritarian collectives, literary journals, bloggers and more to share the Legacy Series. Contact daniela@dcapmedia.com if you are interested in collaborating.

WHY WE’RE STARTING WITH FIRE!!

A zine’s influence should not be defined solely by reviewers, subscriber count or the amount of copies in circulation.

LEARN MORE:

harlemsreflection:

image

Fire!! was an African American literary magazine published in 1926 during the Harlem Renaissance. The publication was started by Wallace ThurmanZora Neale HurstonAaron DouglasJohn P. DavisRichard Bruce NugentGwendolyn BennettLewis Grandison AlexanderCountee Cullen, and Langston Hughes.

Fire!! Magazine was a quarterly literature magazine. Only one expenditure of the magazine appeared, i.e. the expenditure from November 1926. It was driven out mainly in New Yorker quarters the Manhattan, into which it by the artists involved by hand one delivered. Fire!! the language pipe of the recent black generation of the Harlem was Renaissance. The young artists at the age between 20 and 31 were dissatisfied with the established, older leaders of the movement. The original title read Fire!! A Quarterly Devoted to the Younger Negro Artists.

Emergence

Starting point of Fire!! the famous artist colony was Nigerati Manor in Harlem. Here one came out in the summer 1926 on the idea to bring its own artist magazine. Among the initial members Wallace Thurman, Zora Neal Hurston, Aaron Douglas, John P ranked. Davis, Richard Bruce Nugent, Gwendolyn Bennett and long clay/tone Hughes. Everyone of these authors should contribute with a starting capital of 50 $ for the pressure of the first expenditure. The further expenditures should be financed by proceeds as well as by donations. This magazine should fulfill the following requirements according to the authors however:

  • The magazine should be understood not as documentation about art, but be represented a work of art. In addition much importance was attached to aesthetic aspects, e.g. Quality of the paper, format, etc.
  • The magazine should be exclusively “devoted ton the younger Negro artist”, itself thus exclusively with “recent” topics like e.g. employ. Hughes described the intention of the young authors in its essay The Negro kindist and the Racial Mountain, publishes 1926 in The nation:

Incoming goods of younger Negro artists who create now intend tons of express our individually dark skinned selves without fear or shame. If white people acres pleased incoming goods of acres glad. If they acres emergency, it doesn’t more matt. Incoming goods know incoming goods of acres beautiful. And ugly too. The tom tom cries and the tom tom laughs. If colored people acres pleased incoming goods of acres glad. If they acres emergency, their displeasure doesn’t more matt more either. Incoming goods build our temples for tomorrow, strong as incoming goods know-how, and incoming goods stood for on top OF the mountain, free within ourselves.

  • In addition the magazine should be so put on that it releases the greatest possible scandal with the white and black establishment.

The name of the magazine was selected following a mirror-image ritual by long clay/tone Hughes.

Contents

Aaron Douglas made the Covergestaltung, as well as three further designs available.

Richard Bruce Nugent took part with two designs as well as the Kurzgeschichte Smoke, Lilies and Jade.

Wallace Thurman was chief executive publisher and enriched Fire!! with an editorial comment as well as with the KurzgeschichteCordelia the Crude.

Zora Neale Hurston wrote the play Color struck and the Kurzgeschichte Sweat.

Gwendolyn Bennett published a Kurzgeschichte, Wedding Day.

Arthur Huff Fauset contributed the essay Intelligentsia.

The following authors arranged the poem part:

Countee Cullen, Helene Johnson, EDP pool of broadcasting corporations Silvera, Waring Cuney, long clay/tone Hughes, Arna Bontemps and Lewis Alexander.

With 1 $ the magazine was approximately four times as expensive as other magazines Zeit.Das magazine was 48 sides strongly.

Meaning

Fire!! was the first joint venture of black authors, which came without the money of wealthy white sponsors. This form of the Patronage was far common, with the Machern of Fire!! however

A group of the authors (among other things Thurman and Hughes) created it with only one expenditure to be established as speakers of a generation of young authors up to then.

In addition, it must be said that the main intention of the authors was not reached to frighten i.e. the black establishment in such a manner that it came to a scandal and the expenditure was censored or even forbidden. With this scandal, which e.g. with Carl van Vechtens novel Nigger Heaven occurred, the authors expected a very fast spreading of Fire!! and larger publicity.

Fire!! found only again into the 1970er/80er years attention as new culture and literature theories developed. It was again presented into the 1980er years.

 

History

Fire!! was conceived with the notion of expressing the Black experience during the Harlem Renaissance in a modern and realistic fashion, using literature as a vehicle of enlightenment. The authors of this magazine wanted an arena to express the changing attitudes of younger African Americans and used Fire!! to facilitate the exploration of issues in the Black community that were not in the forefront of mainstream African American society such as homosexuality, bisexuality, interracial relationships, promiscuity, prostitution, andcolor prejudice within the Black community itself.

The publication was so named, according to Langston Hughes, “to burn up a lot of the old, dead conventional Negro-white ideas of the past … into a realization of the existence of the younger Negro writers and artists, and provide us with an outlet for publication not available in the limited pages of the small Negro magazines then existing.”.

Ironically, the magazine’s headquarters burned to the ground shortly after releasing its first issue.

Contributors

Wallace Thurman
Zora Neale Hurston
Langston Hughes
Aaron Douglas
Richard Bruce Nugent
Gwendolyn Bennett
Countee Cullen
Waring Cuney
Arna Bontemps
Helene Johnson
Edward Silvera
Arthur Huff Fauset
Lewis Alexander

(Source: firepress.com)

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