POC ZINE PROJECT

Posts tagged Nia King

ZINESTER SPOTLIGHT: Nia King, 2013 #RaceRiotTour Member

2013 #RaceRiotTour member Nia King

[DESCRIPTION: Nia King & her LOVE & ROCKETS shirt <3]

This isn’t the first time we’ve featured Nia King on POCZP’s digital platforms but it’s definitely one of the most exciting announcements so far: 

Nia’s joining the 2013 #RaceRiotTour caravan! Look out for her during the following dates/cities:

10/19/2013 - San Francisco, CA

10/21/2013 - Davis, CA

10/23/2013 - Portland, OR

10/25/2013 - Seattle, WA

Nia will be documenting the NorCal/Northwest leg of the tour through photography and video. She will also be selling two new zines on tour, one tentatively titled Ain’t No One Paying Your Ass to Be There: Words of Wisdom from Queer and Trans Artists of Color, and another called Art School is Hell. Her old zines will also be available, either through her, or through Brown Recluse Distro.

Here’s what Nia had to say about joining this year’s Race Riot! Tour experience: 

The POC Zine Project’s work is SO important! When I was growing up, it was really hard to find zines by people of color. Zines gave me a place to process what it meant to be mixed when I didn’t have a mixed community, and allowed me to connect with other writers from multiracial families like Shannon Perez-Darby (From Here to There and Back Again), Aidan Aberrant (Ataxia), and Claudia Leung (MOONROOT). Lauren Jade Martin’s zine Quantify was particularly influential in helping my understand myself as a mixed-queer person. 

As a largely unregulated and uncensored form of media, I think zines are a really powerful tool for self-expression and community-building in communities that are historically excluded from having their voices heard and their faces seen. Zines offer us the opportunity to “become the media,” which allows us to shape the way our stories are told, a crucial step in self-determination.

ABOUT NIA KING

Nia King is a queer mixed-race art activist from Boston, MA living in Oakland, CA. She is the author of zines such as Angry Black-White Girl, MXD: True Stories by Mixed-Race Writers, the Borderlands series, and The First 7-Inch Was Better: How I Became an Ex-Punk.

She is also the creator of the short film The Craigslist Chronicles, QTPOC Comics, and the podcastWe Want the Airwaves: QPOC Artists on the Rise. While much of her older work focuses on mixed-race identity, her new work focuses on the lives of queer and trans people of color and the power of art as a tool for social change.

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WANT MORE?

We will share more 2013 #RaceRiotTour member bios between now and our kickoff date, October 3, 2013 in NOLA. We have 19 confirmed touring members so far <3 Bookmark our #RaceRiotTour landing page, as we will update it with all bio links and other important information in the coming days.

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

Read a F*cking Zine: 50 Zines by Queer People of Color

[Description: page 4 of 4 of our article on Autostraddle.com]

As we noted at the top of this pieces we intentionally released on Autostraddle.com (thanks for your support!), the list is not meant to represent all zines created by QTPOC. Use it as a rabbit hole of sorts on your path toward discovering more queer zines by people of color.

Check the bottom of the last page of the piece for information on how we came up with this list, plus feel free to submit suggestions for the updated list we’ll launch with our official POCZP website in Spring of 2014!

This list would not have been possible without the contributions from - and collaboration with - the following folks:

- Queer Zine Archive Project

- Barnard Zine Library

- POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano & artist/activist Nia King

If you have any questions/concerns/love you want to share via email regarding this piece, send away! —> poczineproject [at] gmail dot com

Please help us fulfill our mission to make zines by people of color easy to find, distribute and share by sharing this curated list. Thank you. <3 - POCZP

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ABOUT AUTOSTRADDLE

Founded in March 2009 and still run by a dedicated team of indentured masochists, Autostraddle is an intelligent, hilarious & provocative voice and a progressively feminist online community for a new generation of kickass lesbian, bisexual & otherwise inclined ladies (and their friends).

Learn more at Autostraddle.com

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

Let’s Talk About: Nia King on her ‘punk privilege’

By Nia King, POCZP Contributor

There are a lot of things I hate about punk culture. You can read about most of them in The First 7-Inch Was Better: How I Became an Ex-Punk. But one of the positive things I took away from punk was the knowledge that I could do things myself (whether it was publishing a zine, putting a show together, or cooking a meal for a big crowd at Food Not Bombs with little help and little culinary training).

I’m not saying the zines, shows, or meals were exceptionally well-produced, but as a pink-haired 16 year old, I knew they were all things I could do myself. I didn’t need to ask permission. 

POCZP contributor Nia King (Summer 2013)

[DESCRIPTION: Nia King assembles some of her zines at home (2013). Photo credit: Nia King] 

As I got older, being a punk became less important to me, and identities like “queer” and “woman of color” began to play a bigger role in my life. I took my passion for social justice out of the VFW kitchen, and poured it into campus organizing in college, and after graduation, an entry level job at a terrible non-profit. There I learned that doing things well required years of training, lots of money, and often outside consultants. Little emphasis was put into helping us build the skills we’d need to do things ourselves. A lot of emphasis was put into making sure I didn’t forget to use oxford commas.

Three years outside of college (and one year outside the uber-dysfunctional non-profit), I am thankful for my punk roots. Though I dropped out of art school and still draw at, what I feel, is a high school level, I started a webcomic, which is currently being featured in the Lady Drawers exhibition in Chicago. With very little audio editing experience, I started a podcast. (I record all the interviews on my phone.) And without ever having taken a journalism class, I started writing for magazines. The verdict is still out on how that’s going.

None of the things I made are award-winning, all of them are a little rough around the edges. But I’ve overcome that deep-seated fear of imperfection that comes from the knowledge that as a queer woman of color I have to be a super-overachiever to be given even half the credit I’m due. I’m amplifying the voices of people from marginalized communities (whether it be myself or other queer and trans artists of color) in a way that I wouldn’t have been able to if I’d continue to believe I needed more training and better equipment before I put my foot in the water. Growing up in punk culture and zine culture taught me, “It doesn’t have to be perfect, you just have to do it.”

I’m sure my privileges as a light-skinned, middle-class, cisgender woman had everything to do with the doors that have been opened for me. Doors were also opened for me by the incredible mentors I had at Mills College and Colorlines Magazine (which is not where I developed my fear of forgetting oxford commas, and was actually an amazingly supportive work environment.)

But punk is where I learned the DIY ethic that taught me I don’t need a ton of schooling or a ton of money to call myself an artist. I just need to make art, self-publish, and hustle to get my work to the audience that matters most to me: other folks from marginalized communities struggling to figure out if they can do it themselves.

Nia King
artactivistnia.com
@artactivistnia

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WANT MORE?

Read: Let’s Keep Talking About Colo(ur)ism & Share Solutions

Read: Zines in the Classroom: Pros and Cons

Read: The Truth Tour and how to be an ally at POC and Native events

Read: Chaun Webster: ‘I make books… that’s my shit’

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“Let’s Talk About” is an experimental series by POCZP created to share communal knowledge, resources and reflections on a wide range of topics affecting communities of color.

If you are a person of color—or a white person with a history of supporting POC Zine Project— who wants to contribute to “Let’s Talk About,” submit to poczineproject@gmail.com with “Let’s Talk About” in the subject line. 

All submissions to “Let’s Talk About” will be compiled into a zine (print & digital) that will be released by POCZP in December of 2013.

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

ZINE SPOTLIGHT: ‘The First 7-inch Was Better: How I Became an Ex-Punk’ by Nia King (2008)

TITLE: The First 7-inch Was Better: How I Became an Ex-Punk (2008)

AUTHOR: Nia King

RELEASE: 2008

PAGES: 20

ORIGIN: Denver, CO

DESCRIPTION BY STRANGERDANGERZINES.COM:

Nia (Angry Black-White Girl and Borderlands) comes forward to declare her status as an ex-punk. She criticizes anarcho-punk and many activist scenes for its ignorance and the lack of inclusion of folks of color, women and queers. Nia refuses to leave a part of herself at the door in order to adjust to the whiteness and maleness of a musical scene that she once truly enjoyed. The zine also includes a pull-out portion in which you can take along to your next show in order to challenge yourself, your friends and other bystanders.

SOURCE: QZAP.ORG

Queer Zine Archive Project (QZAP) is responsible for scanning and making Nia’s zine file available online. POCZP helped to “liberate” this publication as an embeddable file for International Zine Month #IZM2013.

READ NOW (OR DOWNLOAD FOR FREE):

THE MAKING OF ‘THE FIRST 7-INCH WAS BETTER’

Excerpt from POZCP touring member Osa Atoe’s interview with Nia in 2009 for Maximumrocknroll:

Osa: Come on! You’re at a punk house right now hanging out with a girl that we both just randomly happen to know through punk… Just admit it you’re still kinda punk!
Nia: [laughs] BUSTED! Well, I don’t feel punk. I feel really alienated in punk spaces. Lo Mas Alla, where Luisa and some of my other friends live, feels kind of different. Most of the people who live there may still have love for punk culture, but they also view punk with a critical lens. At some point, most of them have told me they are growing out of punk. I could try and defend it further but it feels silly. I am staying with punks at a punk house. Fact. Am I a punk? No.
Osa: Yeah, well the point I’m trying to make is half-silly and half-serious. I do feel strongly about the fact that people of color end up relinquishing so much to white people just because white people take up all that space. I mean, how many times have you talked to another black girl who’s like, “I’m not a feminist because I feel like feminism is for white women”? And I’m thinking that feminism is an important tool, just like punk is for me, and I’m definitely not going to let white people define what it means to be punk or feminist. I’m going to use those words, those tools, in ways that benefit me.
Nia: I feel that, but defending punk and feminism can be a lot of work, and a lot of the criticism I’ve heard of both is valid. I guess trying to hold space for POCs in punk is exhausting, not because they’re not already there taking up (some) space, but because being the only POC in a room is fucking exhausting in my experience. I wanted to retreat to spaces where I didn’t feel like I had to fight for visibility or have to call people on their shit all the time, and for me punk was not that. Not that I was the lone voice of reason or the lone POC, but often enough, it felt like it. I have nothing but respect for women of color who hold it down in punk rock and call shit out, and make records and write zines, but it’s not for me anymore. Orat least I’m a lot pickier about the ways I engage with it and the situations I put myself in. You feel me?
Osa: Yeah I do. I think that’s why it’s so important to have this conversation because I can see how we’re coming at it from such different perspectives even though both are valid. I totally relate to feeling drained to the bone by being in predominantly white “progressive” spaces. And it wasn’t just punk. Going to college for women’s studies with all those well-meeting white liberal feminists almost gave me an aneurysm. At the same time, for me, it’s not about defending punk or feminism. I just am those things in my daily life. I feel like I did give up fighting for visibility and correcting ignorance and oppressive dynamics in punk scenes. But that just meant that I spent more time hanging out with the brown kids and cultivating those relationships.

Read Osa’s full interview with Nia here.

ABOUT NIA KING

Nia King is a queer art activist of color from Boston, Massachusetts. She currently resides in Oakland, California where she runs the podcast We Want the Airwaves: QPOC Artists on the Rise.

Nia King

artactivistnia.com

@artactivistnia

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

ZINE SPOTLIGHT: Skinned Heart Quatro, reviewed by Nia King

EDIT: Skinned Heart Quatro by Nyky Gomez (2012)

TITLE: Skinned Heart Quatro

AUTHOR NAME: Nyky Gomez

RELEASE DATE: 2012

PAGES: 32

ORIGIN: Seattle, WA, USA

DESCRIPTION ON DORISDORISDORIS.COM

About recovering from an emotionally and physically abusive relationship - some of the details of it. I am always so proud when  people have the ability to write about what exactly was the abuse,  because emotional abuse is so commonly not recognized when we’re in it, and it can really help to see other people’s experiences - to be able to say “yes! That is what it was like for me too!”

And it is also so good to read about her becoming herself again - learning to have confidence, taking care of herself, her current healthy relationship, still caring  about the world and people.

Also about Assimilation and Resistance, living away from her family  and longing for her cultural roots (living in Seattle instead of the South West), family history and that feeling of living in dual  realities, and assimilation being hard to stop. 

WHERE TO BUY: http://www.dorisdorisdoris.com/zines3.html

$3.65 u.s., $4.25 canada and mexico, $5.25 international

POCZP REVIEWS SKINNED HEART QUATRO

By Nia King

EDIT: Nia King holds Skinned Heart Quatro by Nyky Gomez (2012)

[DESCRIPTION: Nia King holds up her copy of Skinned Heart Quatro by Nyky Gomez. Photo edit by POCZP]

Nyky breaks the silence about a lot things in Skinned Heart Quatro: seasonal depression, emotional and sexual abuse, chronic medical problems, and estrangement from her culture of origin.

The zine starts with a short essay called Northwest State of Mind, which talks about moving from the Southwest to the Northwest: the differing physical environment, cultural norms, and lack of sunshine. Nyky goes on to detail the journey of being in an emotionally and sexually abusive relationship: realizing it was abusive, gradually prying herself free, and slowly healing. (I appreciated the trigger warning for this section.)

The next story, Mi Cuerpo es Mio, describes her struggle with an ongoing medical crisis: having chronic bladder infections for unexplained reasons, eventually being diagnosed with interstitial cystitis, and being forced to adopt a healthier lifestyle (all without insurance).

The last essay, Chasing the Dream, is a reflection on the intergenerational impact of assimilation: being fourth generation Mexican-American, feeling estranged from Brown culture, and being “shown up” by white girls who speak better Spanish.

Excerpt from Skinned Heart Quatro by Nyky Gomez (2012)

[DESCRIPTION: A page from Skinned Heart Quatro by Nyky Gomez]

Nyky’s writing is poignant, insightful, and sharp. I love the way that she melds being earnest and vulnerable and being punk rock/cursing like a sailor so seamlessly. For example, reflecting on her time in Seattle, she says, “I’ve met some fucking awesome people and I’ve met some weird people and I’ve met some real shitheads, and I’m constantly learning how to communicate with different people different ways that are still me.” She makes it look easy to put words to the feelings so many of us identify with but struggle to articulate. For example, reflecting on her abusive relationship, she notes, “Love can cloud your perception and confuse your emotional alarms sometimes.”

Much of her reflection and analysis will resonate with anyone who has been in a shitty relationship or been involved with punk/anarchist communities. One of this zine’s greatest strengths is drawing attention to the way punk and radical feminism make women feel like they have to be tough and strong, even at the expense of their own emotional well-being. This is an important work by a great writer and well worth the three dollars.

- All photos provided by Nia King

ABOUT NIA KING

Nia King is a mixed-race artist, activist, writer, and filmmaker from Boston, MA who is proud to call Oakland home.

Nia is a contributor to ColorlinesInterrupt Mag, and Youngist. Her writing about race, gender, and sexuality has also been published in Women and Performance: A Journal of Feminist Theory and the book Zines in Third Space: Radical Cooperation and Borderlands Rhetoric. She has presented her undergraduate thesis, “Mangos with Chili: Life-Sustaining Performance Art for and by Queer and Transgender People of Color,” at Stanford University, UC Riverside, and the University of Arizona.

Her filmThe Craigslist Chronicles, has screened at the National Queer Arts Festival, Queer Women of Color Film Festival, York University, University of Toronto, and NYU. Her comics have been published by ColorlinesQWOC Media Wire, and Interrupt Mag. Her most recent project is a podcast where she interviews emerging queer and transgender artists of color. She currently works as a freelance journalist, videographer, and comedy writer. She is also available for speaking engagements and film screenings.

You can contact Nia directly at niaking AT zoho DOT com.

Learn more about Nia’s zine-making history here.

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COMMUNITY: Do you want to review zines for POCZP? Learn more about POCZP internship & volunteer opportunities here. We are still accepting applications. 

If you specifically want to help review zines, email poczineproject@gmail.com with “zine reviews” in the subject line. We reserve the right to prioritize applications from people of color.

If you are interested in POCZP leading a workshop or other event in collaboration with your organization - worldwide - email poczineproject@gmail.com.

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

ZINESTER SPOTLIGHT: Nia King
POC Zine Project founder Daniela Capistrano met Nia in person - for the first time - on November 9, while working in San Francisco. It was fortuitous, because just a week or two prior, Daniela ordered Nia&#8217;s back catalogue of zines for the POC Zine Project archive directly from Nia.
Nia and Daniela had a great conversation about the historical context of zines by POC, the role of POC Zine Project and materiality as a catalyst for activism and building community. Some of this discussion will appear in an interview for Colorlines.com in the coming weeks.
Here are excepts from the letter that Nia mailed Daniela with the zine order:

&#8230;I am working on something for the Mixed-Race Queer Feminist zine. I also submitted a revised/improved version of &#8220;The First 7-Inch Was Better&#8221; for the &#8220;Punk Anterior&#8221; issue of Women and Performance: a Journal of Feminist Theory. It should be coming out any day now.
&#8230;I just wanted to say that I really respect the work you are doing, and I wish there had been a resource like POC Zine Project when I was a young zinester.

We &lt;3 you, Nia! Thanks for everything that you do. We look forward to collaborating with you on the 2013 Southwest/West Coast Race Riot! Tour!
ABOUT NIA
Nia King is a mixed-race artist, activist, writer, and filmmaker from Boston, MA who is proud to call Oakland home. She currently writes for Colorlines.com, a national racial justice news website.
Before joining Colorlines, Nia worked to improve the quality of life of queer and transgender students of color at Mills College by organizing a number of educational, political, and social events for the campus community.
Before moving to Oakland, Nia served as a Grassroots Fundraising Specialist and Crisis Hotline Volunteer at the Colorado Anti-Violence Program, a nonprofit which works to end violence within and against Colorado&#8217;s LGBTQ communities.
In addition to her nonprofit work, Nia has spend the last five years self-publishing, presenting at conferences, and screening her film, &#8220;The Craigslist Chronicles.&#8221; Her writing has been published in Zine Yearbook 9, Race Revolt Magazine, and the book Zines in Third Space: Radical Cooperation and Borderlands Rhetoric. More of her writing is soon to be published in Women and Performance: A Journal of Feminist Theory.
Nia has presented her undergraduate research project, &#8220;Mangos with Chili: Life-Sustaining Performance Art for and by Queer and Transgender People of Color,&#8221; at Stanford University, UC Riverside, and the University of Arizona. Her most recent project, a short comedic film about apartment hunting in Oakland, premiered at the 2012 National Queer Arts Festival in San Francisco, and recently had its international premiere at the Trans Film Screening Series at the University of Toronto&#8217;s Center for Women &amp; Trans People.
You can contact Nia directly at niaking@zoho.com.
COMMUNITY: You can access many of Nia&#8217;s zines for free on QZAP.org, as well as order them from Stranger Danger Distro. Here&#8217;s a taste:
The 7-Inch was Better: How I Became and Ex-Punk (online at QZAP)

“Nia (Angry Black-White Girl and Borderlands) comes forward to declare her status as an ex-punk. She criticizes anarcho-punk and many activist scenes for its ignorance and the lack of inclusion of folks of color, women and queers. Nia refuses to leave a part of herself at the door in order to adjust to the whiteness and maleness of a musical scene that she once truly enjoyed. The zine also includes a pull-out portion in which you can take along to your next show in order to challenge yourself, your friends and other bystanders.” - quoted from StrangerDangerDistro.com

ZINESTER SPOTLIGHT: Nia King

POC Zine Project founder Daniela Capistrano met Nia in person - for the first time - on November 9, while working in San Francisco. It was fortuitous, because just a week or two prior, Daniela ordered Nia’s back catalogue of zines for the POC Zine Project archive directly from Nia.

Nia and Daniela had a great conversation about the historical context of zines by POC, the role of POC Zine Project and materiality as a catalyst for activism and building community. Some of this discussion will appear in an interview for Colorlines.com in the coming weeks.

Here are excepts from the letter that Nia mailed Daniela with the zine order:

…I am working on something for the Mixed-Race Queer Feminist zine. I also submitted a revised/improved version of “The First 7-Inch Was Better” for the “Punk Anterior” issue of Women and Performance: a Journal of Feminist Theory. It should be coming out any day now.

…I just wanted to say that I really respect the work you are doing, and I wish there had been a resource like POC Zine Project when I was a young zinester.

We <3 you, Nia! Thanks for everything that you do. We look forward to collaborating with you on the 2013 Southwest/West Coast Race Riot! Tour!

ABOUT NIA

Nia King is a mixed-race artist, activist, writer, and filmmaker from Boston, MA who is proud to call Oakland home. She currently writes for Colorlines.com, a national racial justice news website.

Before joining Colorlines, Nia worked to improve the quality of life of queer and transgender students of color at Mills College by organizing a number of educational, political, and social events for the campus community.

Before moving to Oakland, Nia served as a Grassroots Fundraising Specialist and Crisis Hotline Volunteer at the Colorado Anti-Violence Program, a nonprofit which works to end violence within and against Colorado’s LGBTQ communities.

In addition to her nonprofit work, Nia has spend the last five years self-publishing, presenting at conferences, and screening her film, “The Craigslist Chronicles.” Her writing has been published in Zine Yearbook 9, Race Revolt Magazine, and the book Zines in Third Space: Radical Cooperation and Borderlands Rhetoric. More of her writing is soon to be published in Women and Performance: A Journal of Feminist Theory.

Nia has presented her undergraduate research project, “Mangos with Chili: Life-Sustaining Performance Art for and by Queer and Transgender People of Color,” at Stanford University, UC Riverside, and the University of Arizona. Her most recent project, a short comedic film about apartment hunting in Oakland, premiered at the 2012 National Queer Arts Festival in San Francisco, and recently had its international premiere at the Trans Film Screening Series at the University of Toronto’s Center for Women & Trans People.

You can contact Nia directly at niaking@zoho.com.

COMMUNITY: You can access many of Nia’s zines for free on QZAP.org, as well as order them from Stranger Danger Distro. Here’s a taste:

The 7-Inch was Better: How I Became and Ex-Punk (online at QZAP)

“Nia (Angry Black-White Girl and Borderlands) comes forward to declare her status as an ex-punk. She criticizes anarcho-punk and many activist scenes for its ignorance and the lack of inclusion of folks of color, women and queers. Nia refuses to leave a part of herself at the door in order to adjust to the whiteness and maleness of a musical scene that she once truly enjoyed. The zine also includes a pull-out portion in which you can take along to your next show in order to challenge yourself, your friends and other bystanders.” - quoted from StrangerDangerDistro.com