POC ZINE PROJECT

Posts tagged POC

Just some sweet and simple anon love: thank you for existing. — Asked by Anonymous

Hi Anon,

Thanks so much for the love. We have been busy! In 2013 (among other initiatives) POCZP led multiple free workshops across the country, presented at Allied Media Conference, Chicago Zine Fest and L.A. Zine Fest to share knowledge, tabled at multiple zine fests in solidarity with local POC, curated & wrote a list of 50 zines by QTPOC, organized & executed a national #RaceRiotTour traveling community experiment, coordinated a massive donation of zines by POC to multiple libraries, continued our Legacy Series work to share influential materiality by POC, provided mini-grants to 20 creators of color, and worked with over 50 volunteers across the country - all as a volunteer entity.

As the recipient of this year’s Long Arm Stapler Award and with our name being dropped in mainstream publications (thanks, Kathleen Hanna!), we are doing our best to graciously navigate public recognition.

Endorsements are great, but what we really need is the resources to be able to continue our important work in 2014 and beyond as a grassroots nonprofit. We consider our work important because we exist to empower people of color to share their stories and to build community. 

We also collaborate with - and disrupt - academic spaces with the intention of being a third space resource.

If you are reading this and believe in POCZP, please donate what you can so that we can continue operations. We aren’t supported by a fiscal sponsor and don’t have an operating budget, and yet we were about to achieve so much this year because we are people-powered. We defy limitations by daring to believe in community.

But we need your help — now more than ever. If you would like to be a part of POCZP’s restructuring phase in 2014, email poczineproject@gmail.com. Help us create a sustainable funding model and access resources.

Please reblog this post and share the donation link with friends. Thank you <3

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

P.S. We are nothing without you, so thank YOU for existing.

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2014. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to ongoing advocacy costs, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

We are rebooted our org structure in 2014 and will be transparent about that process. Stay tuned.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: Selfie Zine (December 28, 2013 deadline)

selfiezine:

CLICK THE IMAGE TO ENLARGE (or open the image in a new tab).

Selfie Zine is accepting submissions for it’s first issue!

Submit: selfies/selfie art, photography, and written works about selfies and selfie culture.

guidelines:

- 18 years or older to submit.

- must be your own original work.

- submit all works to selfiezine@gmail.com with

the subject line :selfie zine submission.

- include your name &/or online handle in the email body if you want.

- include what medium/materials you used. (ex:instagram+iphone, acrylic on canvas, canon t3i, etc.)

- if you want to, feel free to add why selfies are meaningful to you or why your specific submission is meaningful, or something similar in a few sentences.

Selfie Zine is primarily run by Ekari, a POC <3

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2014. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to ongoing advocacy costs, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

We are rebooted our org structure in 2014 and will be transparent about that process. Stay tuned.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

POC Zine Project wants to see YOUR #POCZINES Collection

What does your ‪#‎poczines‬ collection look like? Send us a photo of your shelf/drawer/area under your pillow/etc. & we’ll feature it in our ‪#‎izm2013‬ reactions post first week of August.

If you only have two zines created by POC, it’s still a collection - even if you made both of them!  

Deadline: August 28, 2013

PLEASE EMAIL: poczineproject@gmail.com (we are only accepting submissions through email, thanks!)

Please be sure to include the following:

- 1-3 max photos of your #poczines collection (please make sure they are as clear as possible) with photo credit info (the higher resolution the better, thanks!)

- your bio

- any links/contact info you want to share

- info about your own zines that YOU make (optional)

- any of your upcoming/current projects that need some signal boost love. We gotchu boo. 

We know many folks collect zines by authors of diverse backgrounds, so it’s 100% OK/common if you have a mix of POC and non-POC authored zines in your collection. However, for the purposes of this visibility exercise, we only want to see the zines made by POC in your collection (co-authored with non-POC is fine, as long as editor was/is POC).

WHITE FOLKS: Send photos & info about your #poczines collection as well! We wants to see the #poczines on your shelves too.

Please be sure to also include what POC solidarity looks like in your life, both in theory and in practice. 

<3,

POCZP

TESTIMONIAL: F.O.K.U.S. & University of Michigan on POC Zine Project [2012]

Part of our advocacy is making our operations/processes as a long term, grassroots advocacy platform, as transparent as possible. We will be taking more steps to expose internal processes to the public in 2014 and beyond.

Moving forward, we’ll share testimonials we receive on a rolling basis. To kick things off, here is the testimonial we received from F.O.K.U.S., the group responsible for bringing us to the University of Michigan on last year’s Race Riot! tour:

Untitled

F.O.K.U.S. presents

OUTSIDE THE LINES:

A PANEL, DISCUSSION, and ZINE-MAKING WORKSHOP

featuring POC Zine Project

as part of their “Race Riot!” Tour

September 29, 2012

On Saturday, September 29, 2012, F.O.K.U.S. brough the artists and activists behind the POC Zine Project to the University of Michigan campus for a three-pronged event.  The event consisted of:

- A 30-minute interactive art activity with attendees.

In order to access attendees’ creativity at the beginning of the event, guests were provided access to drawing materials and blank sheets of paper on which to add drawings, write prose or poetry, and collaborate with other attendees.  These sheets of paper were clipped to clotheslines criss-crossing along the walls of the room and grouped by theme.  Attendees were asked to clip the papers back up after they were done adding to them.  After thirty minutes the audience was seated and the sheets, filled with collaborative art, were clipped again to the clotheslines.

- A 60-minute panel and discussion with the POC Zine Project panelists. 

This discussion consisted of the POC Zine Project artists and zine-makers explaining their individual approach to zines.  Additionally, they addressed the intersection of race, DIY/punk culture, and inequality in zine culture. 

- A 60-minute mini zine-making workshop facilitate by POC Zine Project artists.

Prior to the workshop, the audience and panelists brainstormed a theme that would drive the zine-making workshop.  During this workshop attendees had the opportunity to learn how to make a zine of their own based on this chosen theme, mixing mediums such as collaging and drawing with prose and poetry.

This event taught FOKUS and event attendees the importance of zines as a tool for self-expression, especially within a multicultural community. 

Zines are self-publications that serve as a political medium to have various viewpoints heard, and frequently are used to express resistance.  With this in mind, student guests could understand zines as a method of making of their voice heard on campus on topics that are either personal or controversial. 

Because of the DIY aspect that was emphasized, attendees could feel the agency zines provide as far as avoiding having their work or expression censored.  Especially in regards to voicing various opinions on topics such as white supremacy, poverty, gender disparities, and other social justice topics affecting present day societies, other forms of publication do not necessarily allow for this same sort of agency.

Many guests to the event had never heard the word “zine” before.  Zines have had little - if any - exposure on University of Michigan campus in recent years.  After the event, guests left with an understanding of the contemporary use of of zines in activism, as well as a new method of accessing their own personal creativity. 

The dynamic and interactive discussion led by the POC Zine Project artists allowed the audience to engage in controversial issues within zine culture, consider a new outlet to express themselves productively on campus, understand networks and resources available to them, and speak with artists with first-hand experience.

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Click here for photos and a recap from our event a the University of Michigan in 2012.

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ABOUT FOKUS

F.O.K.U.S. builds a global community of creativity using the arts. They set out to keep the innovators and visionaries alive, regardless of industry, by awakening the creative mind through art experiences which also reinforce life skills.

F.O.K.U.S. uses the arts to unite, inspire and empower within diverse communities. This is accomplished through the production of events, workshops and the publication of INSIGHT, a quarterly arts magazine.

F.O.K.U.S. highlights the importance of and need for the arts and creativity in life. They believe the arts enable people to rise above barriers in society by creating new paths of communication and ways of thinking.

READ THE MAY 2013 ISSUE OF INSIGHT

https://www.facebook.com/fokus.aa

http://www.fokus.org

http://www.twitter.com/fokus
http://www.youtube.com/fokus
http://blog.fokus.org/

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT: #CAHungerStrike #PelicanBay Awareness

POCZP Donor and Resistance Behind Bars author Victoria Law (who also edits Tenacious zine) will be on the ”Melissa Harris-Perry" show this Saturday, July 13 (show starts at 10am ET), to talk about what is happening at #PelicanBay and other prisons in California. Vikki will be discussing her recent article about the Pelican Bay hunger strikes and the families organizing in support of their demands.

Follow #nerdland on Twitter to view the related conversation during the show.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT #CAHungerStrike

Right now 30,000 prisoners in California are on hunger strike. According to Amnesty International, that is the largest hunger strike in the state’s history, encompassing roughly two-thirds of the state’s inmates.

For additional context on why the strike is happening, check out some of the shocking facts in the infographic below on the conditions of indefinite isolation in California, where more than 3,000 prisoners are held in these high security isolation units known as Security Housing Units (SHUS).

Additionally, The Sacramento Bee reports that the Center for Investigative Reporting found that the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation sterilized nearly 150 female inmates from 2006 to 2010 without required state approvals.

[DESCRIPTION: This single page infographic by Amnesty International is best viewed in full screen mode to zoom in on sections]

Follow #CAHungerStrike on Twitter to stay informed. 

MORE INFO FROM HOMIES UNIDOS

The California Prisoner’s Hunger Strike started once again on July 8, 2013. The protesters have said that they will not stop until demands are addressed even if that means giving their lives.

Sign the petition: The Petition

Statewide Rally at Corcoran State Prison

Saturday, July 13, 3:00 PM

Bus and carpool leaves from Los Angeles at 8:30 AM, 

From: Chuco’s Justice Center,1137 E. Redondo, Inglewood

THE FIVE DEMANDS 

The inhumane conditions inside CA dungeons, particularly in isolation - a form of torture -, brought prisoners together across racial, geographic, and political lines. They united to end hostilities and fight for changes in SHU conditions. These men have suffered injustice and torture for decades. Governors, wardens, courts, and media have disregarded all previous attempts to change conditions. As a result, the hunger-strikers have placed their lives on the line and developed five core demands: Link for Flier

  • End Group Punishment & Administrative Abuse: Hold people accountable for their individualactions,rather than punishing everyone. Collective punishment is a fascist practice!
  • Abolish the Debriefing Policy, and Modify Active/Inactive Gang Status Criteria: The ‘debriefing’ policy is known as “snitch or die” - since the only way out of the SHU is to debrief (inform on another prisoner). In some cases, people have been in the SHUs since the ’60s or ’70s for political beliefs or jailhouse lawyering. 
  • End Long-Term Solitary Confinement. Comply with 2006 US Commission on Safety and Abuse in America’s Prisons. International human rights organizations recognize sensory deprivation is psychological torture. 
  • Provide Adequate and Nutritious Food, adequate medical care, and access to natural light.
  • Expand and Provide Constructive Programming and Privileges for Indefinite SHU Status Inmates. People in SHUs aren’t released, since there’s no constructive program available with which to qualify for parole.

Join the Hunger Strike Solidarity Coalition and bring in your school, union, community or coreligionists. Hunger Strike Solidarity So Cal Coalition (in formation) includes families, ex-prisoners & others. To get involved, 213-858-3486 or hungerstrikesolidaritysocal@gmail.com

For more information about the Five Core Demands, please visitprisonerhungerstrikesolidarity.wordpress.com  

Facebook Invite: https://www.facebook.com/events/672950029398476/

In October 2012 incarcerated people in the hunger strike came to an agreement to end all hostilities against each other, the agreement can be found here: 

http://prisonerhungerstrikesolidarity.wordpress.com/2012/09/11/short-corridor-collective-calls-for-statewide-end-to-hostilities/ 

ADDITIONAL MEDIA COVERAGE

Photos of Protesters Against Solitary Confinement - LA Daily News Media 

http://photos.dailynews.com/2013/07/photos-protesters-against-solitary-confinement/?utm_source=buffer&utm_campaign=Buffer&utm_content=buffere54e5&utm_medium=twitter#3

 Los Angeles Times:

Spanish Interviews:
Maria and Jesus Aguirre speak of their struggles with their loves in prison and the hunger strike. starts at 47 minutes.

http://archive.kpfk.org/mp3/kpfk_130709_213030vocesdelibertad.MP3

Spanish interview on Telemundo with Delia Rodriguez on the Hunger Strike:

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=4476878340187&set=o.520666777981595&type=2&theater 

Spanish coverage of the Hunger Strike:

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=4476560252235&set=o.520666777981595&type=2&theater 

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

ZINE SPOTLIGHT: How to Stage a Coup [NOW AVAILABLE ONLINE AND FOR DISTRO]

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Earlier this year Helen Luu donated her original flat for How to Stage a Coup: An Insurrection of the Underground Liberation Army (2000) to POCZP, which we scanned just in time for POCZP’s participation at Allied Media Conference in Detroit.

Yes, it’s here!!!

READ & SHARE ‘HOW TO STAGE A COUP’

POCZP’s mission is to make zines by people of color easy to find, distribute and share. We are thrilled to share this legacy zine with the world in digital form and will be providing (sliding-scale priced) print copies at all Race Riot! tour events this fall.

HTSAC will be free for all POC attendees at Race Riot! tour events.

***This zine is best viewed online or via mobile in full-screen mode***

TITLE: How to Stage a Coup: An Insurrection of the Underground Liberation Army 

EDITOR: Helen Luu

PUBLISHED: 2000

DESCRIPTION BY POCZP TOUR MEMBER MIMI THI NGUYEN IN 2000:

Helen Luu recently edited a compilation zine called How To Stage A Coup, aimed at creating a dialogue among people of color involved in subcultural pursuits (including punk rock) around race, racism and politics. Contributors like Lauren Martin (You Might As Well Live, Quantify), Lynn Hou (Cyanide), Celia Prez (I Dreamed I Was Assertive), Elizabeth Martinez (Colorlines) and Vincent Chung address a wide variety of issues from organizing and identity politics, to activist dynamics and punk rock betrayals. What does it mean to look at the photographs of Third World suffering on the covers of grindcore records? What does it mean to talk about “pride”? Where was the “color” in Seattle/WTO? What comes first – “being brown or being famous”? The contributors to this compilation ask important questions that need asking, again and again, and Helen Luu brings it all together. 

Click here for the rest of Mimi’s interview, and check out Helen’s DJ projects as MissRuckus.

DO YOU WANT TO DISTRO ‘HOW TO STAGE A COUP’?

We announced on our Facebook page that we have two digital downloads available:

1) Print version

This version was made from a scan of the original flat. It was created with the intention of sharing with folks for distribution of the print version.

2) Read-version

This is the online-friendly version you can see in the embed above. This file is best viewed in e-readers or printed with the expectation that it will be page by page and not the same as the flat.

HOW TO ACCESS HTSAC FILES

We’re raising funds to make 200+ print versions of How to Stage a Coup to give away during tour, so we’re asking folks interested in gaining access to either files to email poczineproject@gmail.com with information about how they plan to use it.

Based on that info (and our relationship with that person/collective), we will ask for a sliding scale donation in exchange for access to a secure file.

We will be providing free access to both downloads on a case-by-case basis. In the meantime, enjoy the read-only version above.

We look forward to seeing more copies of How to Stage a Coup in circulation and on shelves in venues/zine libraries/archives worldwide! 

Please note that, per Luu’s donation statement, "This zine and the parts within it are not to be used for profit (paying for expenses is okay though)."

We’ll have more details about who follows up to distro and archive How to Stage a Coup in the coming weeks and months. 

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

Let’s Talk About: ‘The Truth Tour and how to be an ally at POC and Native events’

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By Cata, POCZP East Coast Intern

The Truth Tour consists of folks from the Pine Ridge reservation of South Dakota and allies, traveling to different cities in the Midwest and mid-Atlantic to tell their stories, advocating for a return to matriarchal leadership and raising awareness of the ongoing genocide of their people. The event I attended was a film screening of the documentary “Red Cry,” held in Washington, DC, on April 16th.

Below is an entry point into a continuous conversation, not a rule book. 

A big question that surrounds POC (people of color) events from those outside of the community holding the event is "how can I be an ally?"

A simple answer to these questions is to put your self in service to the community and don’t take up space. 

DC ‘TRUTH TOUR' EVENT RECAP

April 16 – Washington, DC – Metropolitan Community Church of DC – 6:30pm

When the Lakota Grandmothers came to DC in April, my partner and I cooked a meal for an event as an act of support/solidarity. What follows here are my reflections as an audience member/participant in the film screening event.

I write with a strong desire to contribute to a (hopefully) ongoing conversation of allyship. The night of the event in DC there were many important voices and stories shared. The group had come a long way to spread their voices. I am thankful for their journey. I felt blessed to be among these strong travelers and hope to meet them again one day.

However, among the powerful stories offered there were important voices and stories that were missed. Here are some things I observed as I watched the evening pass with a complex interplay of isms and unchecked privileges.

For days afterward I couldn’t get out of my head the Q&A session after the “Red Cry” screening. 

The white anarchist/activist who stood up and said “I don’t know about the rest of the room, but me and my house mates on THIS side of the room- we’re REALLY in SOLIDARITY with you all! REALLY!”

This wasn’t a question; it was a comment offered perhaps to receive an ego stroke from the audience/caravaners and it was distracting.

Then, there was an African-American woman who stood up asking to be part of the Lakota people, referencing her own Native heritage. It was refreshing to see a person of color seeking to honor their indigenous heritage— but the word use: “Can I be a part of you?” made my face scrunch.

Again, this was not a question pertaining to their journey or to the film.

Then, three or four folks raised their hands… again without questions… but instead with gifts. Literally folks were walking up to an elder with shells, books and bags of what? I don’t know.

Weird? Yes. Distracting? Yes. Ego strokes? Yes and yes.

Three-quarters of the way through the event, the main Native male speaker who had been speaking the most and facilitating, acknowledged that the others on his caravan, including most of the women, had not spoken. He suggested that they go down the line and share something.

"Yes, finally!" I thought, time to hear everyones voice. But, wait. One more person in the audience needs the spot light and asks a question/comment…then POOF! Our time is done.

A song is sung and things are wrapped up. There is never time to hear the voices of the other Native folks, most of them women, from the caravan.

NEXT STEPS

As POC organizers we need to reflect:

  • On this Truth Tour designed to advocate a return to matriarchy, how did the Native man facilitating (and the crew as a whole) not realize that his voice was filling the time available at the expense of other (female) voices from the caravan?
  • How do we as POC organizers/activists let inter-communities privileges distract or disappear an important layer in our events or projects? 
  • How did the audience continue on unaware of their distracting behavior?
  • Why did certain audience members(and why do some folks) think it was/is ok to deconstruct their internal conflicts on some one else’s time?

This brings me back to allyship. Here are some ways to be an ally:

1) Be aware of your layers (gender, colourism, class, race, orientation, shyness etc).

2) Take your OWN time to process privilege, settlers guilt etc.

3) Do your service, go home and process in your journal or with other allies about your experience and how to be a better ally next time.

It’s all good. We are all learning here, but to distract from someone else’s event/or project with your own internal conflicts is unchecked privilege. To disappear someone else’s voice or story with your own, no matter if you’re an ally or a member of the community is rude. These patterns disrupt progress.

Privileges unchecked and unprocessed hurt ourselves and our communities. Until we learn as how to beware of our layers and hold one another accountable the biggest thing that will come of our events and projects in the eyes of others (and maybe ourselves) is debriefing the distractions.

Distractions are annoying. And, distractions are NOT solidarity. Lets move the focus back.

NYC ‘TRUTH TOUR’ EVENT RECAP

April 8, 2013 – New York City, NY, Judson Memorial Church- 239 Thompson St. (Solidarity/Decolonization Training) – 7:00pm

By Anonymous contributor to POCZP

I attended the Indigenous Solidarity and Decolonizing Training at Judson Memorial Church in hopes of learning more about the Lakota people, their struggles, and what it means to be in solidarity with indigenous communities. I was looking forward to participating in conversations about the meaning of decolonization and how one develops and sustains a political praxis around decolonizing the self in relation to community.

These days I have been thinking a lot about what it means for me, a women of color to challenge the mindset of settler colonialism that is part of my privilege and my immigrant histories. I believe that the complexities of communities of color engaging with native and indigenous communities should not be limited to understand through reading books and watching documentaries, so I went to this event to listen, to learn, to say hello.

I have deep respect the leaders of this training, for their histories and communities, and for the ways in which they walk through this world. However what I experienced last night was triggering, frustrating, and very confusing.

All but one of the Lakota grandmothers was present and the reason for this was never clearly explained or discussed. We began by asking those in the room who have any European ancestry, to stand up. As expected nearly eighty plus percent of the room were of European descent; I was one of few women of color, and perhaps South Asian in the room who did not stand up.

I have a vague understand of the purpose of this exercise, to call attention to the active realities of colonization as part of people’s being, and that as privilege that you cannot erase. However the presenters did not once ask any questions or specifically engage with the people of color in the room to ask why there were present, what it means for people of color to experience colonialism, and how the displacement of communities of color can reinforce colonial oppressions that native peoples face.

Once again white people became the center focus of the discussion, a conversation that I am sick in tired of having.

How can we destroy the constructs of whiteness if we continually reify them in our political spaces through reliving trauma and shaming one another?

There were several instances where the main “teacher” of this “training” used disparaging language against biracial and multiracial people. They outlined the role of elderly women, or the grandmothers in the struggle without giving the elderly women in the room a chance to speak out on their own and share their stories.

There was a moment where a white man was being disruptive and the presenter challenged him on his behavior, but did not ask him to leave the room. Of course this man continued to be disruptive and my friend, a women of color, had to ask him to leave.

I could give further specifics and in detail but I am not interested in calling out the presenter or the organizers of this event. Rather, I write this to raise the question of how can we build solidarity and decolonize together when so many of our political spaces are dominated by the politics of whiteness and by those whom I gender as being male-identified and male-bodied?

What is it going to take for men to recognize their male-privilege and to step down, work together on building true allyship with women in the struggle, and to call each other out?

There is a lot to say about this training. I am vested in having these conversations in person, and with people I hope to build my politics and community with.

However, in sharing this, I hope we can have a more open and honest dialogue about how to challenge spaces that are political defunct in the moment, and how to create something new that has a liberating direction.

Editor’s Note: POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano attended the NYC Truth Tour date and put a call for feedback on the POCZP Facebook page. Subsequently, Daniela spoke with this anonymous contributor, who gave POCZP permission to publish their thoughts under the condition that they remain anonymous. POCZP respects their choice to remain anonymous, as often it can be very difficult and triggering as a POC to question POC-led movements/actions.

MORE ON THE APRIL 8 NYC TRUTH TOUR EVENT

Below are POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano’s thoughts on the NYC Truth Tour event, originally published on the POCZP Facebook page. She also recorded this positive moment at the end of the evening:

[DESCRIPTION: The event leaders asked attendees to participate in a round dance at the end of the event. Couples were placed in the middle circle, while the elders were in another circle around it. After a while, others who weren’t necessarily elders were encouraged to join the outer circle. Native and non-native folks participated in the dance. This video captures about 80% of the round dance duration.]

By Daniela Capistrano, POCZP founder

The event overall was (for folks we spoke to) very triggering and complex. I wish that more female elders spoke, since that is what the tour is about. However, I also understand that there is another related event where female elders will be speaking.

This event wasn’t an “easy” experience. Some folks said there wasn’t enough actual training and that it was more of a blame game. Others did not agree with this assessment at all and said they got a lot out of it.

The event leaders asked everyone at the start of the experience “to listen with your heart.” Some people in attendance had a very had time just listening and there were many privilege issues at play. One white male would not stop interjecting and made it all about him until he was asked to stop. He could not handle that feedback and left.

Another white male took up way too much time singing a “spiritual” song, making the focus about him instead of the elders. A white female spoke on behalf of a black male in attendance without his consent. Many interesting and triggering actions went down last night at this event, a microcosm of bigger issues at play …

Some participants had issues with being put on the spot based on race, class and gender. Another controversial facet of the training was when attendees were challenged to cut up their government IDs as a symbol of their commitment to decolonize. Clearly there are many factors that would inform someone’s decision to participate or not, such as citizenship status in the U.S. and the dangerous ramifications of not having ID while experiencing racial profiling or worse. Race, class and gender were also factors.

One could argue that this act of cutting up an ID meant nothing and was in fact hurtful to undocumented folks in attendance or others in tenuous circumstances. Lots to think about. But I aired on the side of listening with an open mind and staying until the end. I chose to cut up my ID to confront my privileges; to know what it felt like to destroy government issued materiality; and to think about all the privileges that made it so “easy” for me to cut up my ID without any real consequences. I did it for myself, didn’t judge those who didn’t and also doesn’t think that cutting an ID automatically “decolonized” my existence and mental state. For me, it was an act of undoing mental damage tied to identity politics.

I am glad that I did stay until the end of the event, because I was able to meet one of the female elders, who I hope will collaborate with POCZP on the Race Riot tour this fall, as #IdleNoMore is our core focus. 

Because I stayed until the end, I was able to capture the round dance on video, which had a very peaceful and healing affect for many who participated.

In closing, it’s 100% OK to not agree with all facets of a decolonizing event. It’s OK to not agree with the leaders and to walk out when you feel triggered. Several people did walk out. But I am glad that I stayed.

NOTICE: POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano reached out to Truth Tour organizers in April to share feedback and to discuss a possible collaboration for the Race Riot! tour. She also reached out again upon publishing this piece. We are patiently awaiting a response.

COMMUNITY: Help make this a productive conversation by adding your thoughts in your reblog.

RESOURCES

Educate yourself on what the Truth Tour is all about:

"Red Cry" information:

"Red Cry" premiered on April 1, 2013, at the Mother Butler Center in Rapid City, SD in Lakota Territory.  It was shown on consecutive nights in other cities as part of the Lakota Truth Tour.

Limited quantities of the Red Cry DVD are available for free.  If you would like a DVD sent to you, Truth Tour organizers request that you give a donation of $5 or more to cover the costs of shipping and materials.

Please mail your address and a check made payable to “Lakota Solidarity Project” to:

Lakota Solidarity Project
PO Box 881
Asheville, NC 28801

If you would like to show the film in your area, they ask that you download the Organizer Toolkit and use this as a model for how to organize the screening. Contact them if you are interested in screening “Red Cry.”

DONATE to the Lakota Solidarity Project/Truth Tour via PayPal by clicking here.

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“Let’s Talk About…” is an experimental series by POCZP created to share communal knowledge, resources and reflections on a wide range of topics affecting communities of color.

If you are a person of color—or a white person with a history of supporting POC Zine Project— who wants to contribute to “Let’s Talk About…” submit to poczineproject@gmail.com with “Let’s Talk About” in the subject line. 

All submissions to “Let’s Talk About…” will be compiled into a zine (print & digital) that will be released by POCZP in December of 2013.

_____________________

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

"I’m also really eager to see what People of Color (POC) Zine Project is bringing. They’re based out of the Bronx and do really important work in bringing non-whites to the forefront of zine communities. This is something that AZF Is highly lacking, and I really appreciate their presence this year."—Amanda Mills, co-founder and organizer of Atlanta Zine Fest

Source: clatl.com

Atlanta Zine Fest 2013

POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano will be tabling on behalf of POC Zine Project at the inaugural Atlanta Zine Fest on June 8 and 9. The table will feature a selection of POCZP zine partner titles, as well as some zines, art and jewelry by local ATL zinesters of color. <3

Be sure to stop by the POCZP table to purchase a fresh copy of Mixed Up! A zine about Mixed-Race Queer & Feminist Experience (you can read and download here for free as well), selections from Free Poet’s Press and be sure to get your issue of masConsumption before we run out of copies!

We’ll also have limited edition POCZP buttons for sale/trade! <3

Judith (see her latest call for submissions to Tom Girl zine here), a local POC zinester, will be tabling with POCZP in Atlanta.

Judith Jones is a writer, blogger, zinester and feminist. She contributes to the online magazine Inconnu and she blogs at Simple But Chic. She can be contacted at pigsthatfly.tumblr.com or simplebutchic247@gmail.com.

From Judith:
I will be bringing issue one and two of Tom Girl and artist trading cards. Also, I’ll bringing a few pieces of my dad’s jewelry to sell. It’s handmade. I’m  also bringing various button rings and earrings that I made by myself. 

POCZP will also be joined by Chantelle Kodua, an environmental enthusiast who enjoys working on various DIY projects in her spare time. When she isn’t out saving the world, by digging recyclables out of trash cans, she can be found spending copious hours on tumblr. She can be contacted at chantellephone.tumblr.com.

Daniela is attending Atlanta Zine Fest on behalf of POCZP to connect with the zine community and local zinesters/writers/publishers/artists of color in preparation for the POCZP tour date in Atlanta in October.

POCZP is sharing tabling space with local zinesters of color, as part of our advocacy to make zines by people of color easy to find, distribute and share.

If you are interested in collaborating with POCZP in Atlanta, contact poczineproject@gmail.com. We are especially interested in hearing from artists/zinesters/activists of color and white folks interested supporting POCZP’s efforts.

_____________________

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

POC Zine Project ‘Let’s Talk About’ column #1: ‘I Make Books…That’s My Shit’

Free Poet's Press website

I Make Books…That’s My Shit: Notes on How I Came to Media Making

By POCZP Midwest Coordinator Chaun Webster, founder of Free Poet’s Press

I make books…that’s my shit.  Love the smell of the pages.  I can recall more than a few embarrassing moments as a child with my head stuck in them as I sat in the library taking deep breaths in.  But more than just the book object, I love reading.  Sci-fi of the order of Octavia Butler, Wild Seed, YES PLEASE!  

Prison Letters from George Jackson, Autobiography by Assata Shakur, Biomythography of Audre Lorde or Maxine Hong Kingston.  I can’t get enough of the magic of language, the dance of the letters on the page as meanings collide in the sometimes challenging, sometimes breathtaking moments.  From Eduardo Galeano, to Ben Okri, to Gloria Anzuldia, I continue to be baptized.  

But more than just reading perhaps it is story that draws me, for I cannot remember my mother ever reading me something that she ever wrote down, but she could tell a story masterfully.  Whether the mysterious, the anecdotal or the epic, she knew how to draw from the powers of her experiences and bear witness.

This is some of the spirit with which I came to my own form of media making, the writing and publishing performing the same gesture that my mother’s storytelling did.  Though I don’t believe she was cognizant of it her stories were a gesture of power, of recognizing that we are here, and that though the legitimate records have criminally left us absent, we will continue to bear witness.  That witness can serve the purpose of balm or explosive strapped to the structures that assault us day to day.  

In my journey with books I would read the record of David Walker and his Appeal, make my own connections to that account and Nat Turner’s rebellion. There was a sense I came to about the interrelation of culture and resistance. Whether it was with this narrative or the work of Ida B. Wells, Lewis Michaux, Dudley Randall or Haki Madhubuti and their respective presses or bookstores, there was something to be said about culture and movement-making.

How do we imagine what has happened or what is possible? What force shapes the way we desire or negotiate and even dare to undermine the structures that govern, if not a cultural force?

Knowing of these stories and of their power was what made me so perplexed by “zinesters” who located that practice in something that was most often raced white and gendered male. The idea of DIY as chic, or a form of branding, misses the substance of the politically performed practice of enslaved Afrikans for whom writing was made illegal. Those same Afrikans who wrote anyway to bear witness that we were here, and will remain. It omits the work of the Black and Brown women who have held the traditions together and whose words work as mortar and sledgehammer.

I make books because there was something humanizing in seeing Jessica Care Moore’s Moore Black Press. It’s power signified something local in knowledge production, that that act was not always external.

I make books because there is a space between oppression and resistance that culture occupies, because cultural revolution is the weapon and because I intend to be fully armed.

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image

Free Poet’s Press is a small publishing company started in 2009 by Chaun Webster (POCZP Midwest Coordinator) with the intent of empowering Black and Brown artists to control their own images. 

_____________________

"Let’s Talk About…" is an experimental series by POCZP created to share communal knowledge, resources and reflections on a wide range of topics affecting communities of color.

If you are a person of color—or a white person with a history of supporting POC Zine Project— who wants to contribute to “Let’s Talk About…” submit to poczineproject@gmail.com with “Let’s Talk About” in the subject line. 

All submissions to "Let’s Talk About…" will be compiled into a zine (print & digital) that will be released by POCZP in December of 2013.

_____________________

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh


"Thank you for bringing the joy of reading back to my life!" - Xicana Aguila on FB

#whywedothis #weloveourcommunity
If you identify as a person of color and you&#8217;re working on a zine - or have one you&#8217;d like to share on our platforms - let us know! Email poczineproject@gmail.com with any questions &lt;3 Please allow 3-5 days for a response.
 
—-
ABOUT POC ZINE PROJECT
POC Zine Project’s mission is to makes ALL zines by POC (People of Color) easy to find, distribute and share. We are an experiment in activism and community through materiality.
ABOUT THE RACE RIOT! TOUR
POC Zine Project held it’s first-ever Race Riot! Tour, producing 20 events in 14 cities, which included speaking engagements at six universities. Our time at the University of Maryland was part of the tour. Click here to view photos from the POC Zine Project: 2012 Race Riot! Tour tour finale at Death By Audio in Brooklyn and access all the tour stop recaps.
STAY INFORMED
We will be taking the Race Riot! tour through 14 more cities in 2013. 
Facebook.com/POCZineProject
Twitter.com/poczineproject
poczineproject.tumblr.com
SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT
If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour and the poverty zine series.
DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh
You can also send well-concealed cash or a check! Email poczineproject@gmail.com for details or if you have questions.
Info about the poverty zine series: http://bit.ly/RLVTVt

"Thank you for bringing the joy of reading back to my life!" - Xicana Aguila on FB

#whywedothis #weloveourcommunity

If you identify as a person of color and you’re working on a zine - or have one you’d like to share on our platforms - let us know! Email poczineproject@gmail.com with any questions <3 Please allow 3-5 days for a response.

 

—-

ABOUT POC ZINE PROJECT

POC Zine Project’s mission is to makes ALL zines by POC (People of Color) easy to find, distribute and share. We are an experiment in activism and community through materiality.

ABOUT THE RACE RIOT! TOUR

POC Zine Project held it’s first-ever Race Riot! Tour, producing 20 events in 14 cities, which included speaking engagements at six universities. Our time at the University of Maryland was part of the tour. Click here to view photos from the POC Zine Project: 2012 Race Riot! Tour tour finale at Death By Audio in Brooklyn and access all the tour stop recaps.

STAY INFORMED

We will be taking the Race Riot! tour through 14 more cities in 2013. 

Facebook.com/POCZineProject

Twitter.com/poczineproject

poczineproject.tumblr.com

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

You can also send well-concealed cash or a check! Email poczineproject@gmail.com for details or if you have questions.

Info about the poverty zine series: http://bit.ly/RLVTVt