POC ZINE PROJECT

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REVIEW: POCZP/Moonroot's Zine-Making Workshop At #AMC2013

onstruggling:

Monica Trinidad and Pidgeon Pagonis from the Brown & Proud Press were able to made it down (or rather up) for the 15th Annual Allied Media Conference in Detroit, MI. The following is solely Monica’s recap:

I’m currently in the car driving back from Detroit after experiencing the exhilarating…

Much love to Monica Trinidad (On Struggling zine) for their positive review of our workshop! 

Excerpt:

The first full workshop we attended on Friday was Zine-making Across the Diaspora led by Daniela Capistrano (POC Zine Project), Adela C. Licona (author of Zines in Third Spaces: Radical Cooperation and Borderlands Rhetoric) and a few awesome folks from MOONROOT. We reviewed the historical root of zines and the use of zines in “third spaces”, which was an unfamiliar term for me, but now Adela’s book is officially on my to-read list.

I appreciated that the presenters of this workshop really hammered home the fact that a focus on POC zines is not an intervention in white zine culture, but that it’s inherently a part of our historical culture (Ida B. Wells’ zines on lynching, Fire! during the Harlem Renaissance, etc.). It reminded me of the reasons why our own zine project is so important to me.

I see our On Struggling zines as a material mode of self-preservation, dismantling isolation, and writing ourselves back into history. Anyway, at the end of the workshop we had the opportunity to create our own mini-zines with the suggested topic of something we’re currently thinking really hard about. I made mine about my dietary restrictions and my sister made hers about costume designing.

Also met Joyce Hatton, aka airhornoftruthandlove, a fellow POC zinester that I follow on tumblr who recently mailed me her kickass zines! Fun!

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

FROM OUR IN-BOX: Mini-Comics As A Way Of Rethinking Pedagogy

"I loved your last note about POC zines and the academy. I’m a Cuban-American mini-comics cartoonist, and I’m finishing my dissertation on using mini-comics as a way of rethinking pedagogy.

I’m going to be serializing my dissertation in the form of mini-comics as I finish each chapter. I don’t know if you get a lot of emails or requests for help from POC doing academic work, but I’d be happy to help in any way (well, in non-exploitative ways).

It’s been a lonely academic experience for me with few (if any) resources for Latin@s in academia, if I could ever be a resource for anyone (in a capacity other than an object of study), please let me know. I’d also love to donate my dissertation to a digital archive for POC students and scholars when I’m finished with it.” — jarodrosello.com

Thanks so much, Jarod! We’ll be in touch.

- POCZP

"Daniela Capistrano, founder of the POC Zine Project, contacted me in 2010 about digitizing and distributing for free the Race Riot compilation zines, which I made in 1997 and 2002. Her goals are numerous, but among them is to support and distribute independent publications by people of color, and to reclaim histories of people of color in publishing cultures, from FIRE! to Race Riot and more. I hadn’t thought about these zines for a while until Osa Atoe from Shotgun Seamstress (a zine for Black punks, feminists, queers, misfits, and freaks) wrote a Maximum Rocknroll column the year previous asking, “Where did all the black and brown punk foremothers go?” and naming me and some others specifically as missing persons. This resonated with me, since I was motivated at the time by a passionate desire to claim the fact of history –that we were here, black and brown punks, feminists, queers, misfits, and freaks—and acknowledge those who came before us and laid the foundations for our becoming punk, and those who were with us when we went through this (or that) moment together, and those who came after us who wonder where we are now.

So when I was scheduled in November 2011 to present an academic paper at the University of Pennsylvania, I contacted Jenna Freedman at the Barnard Zine Library (Jenna has focused that zine collection on women of color zines specifically) about doing an event there, at Barnard. In short order, she organized the first “Meet Me at the Race Riot” panel with Kate Wadkins of For the Birds Feminist Collective and Distro and Daniela of POC Zine Project. We had an in-depth dialogue with seventy-something people in this small windowless room, and Daniela thought, We should take this show on the road. The first POC Zine Project/Race Riot! Tour happened in September and October 2012 – 5 and sometimes 6 women of color in a van, hitting 14 cities and 20 events in 2 weeks. Every night –and sometimes twice in one day— we would read from our zines and facilitate these often super-intense conversations about structures of race and racism, punk activism, feminist art, anarchist politics, consent and accountability, violence, family histories and queer becoming. It was exhausting, but also exhilarating, to be a part of these conversations and to be able to facilitate and funnel some of what I know and do as a feminist scholar trained in comparative race studies and transnational cultural studies into these spaces – not just college classrooms, but also cafes, art collectives, living rooms, punk venues, independent bookstores, and more. One of the more significant consequences to growing up punk, for me, is an understanding that politics can and should be found and unfolded anywhere – and that one does not need to be an expert to be curious, outraged, or outspoken about the conditions that structure our everyday lives.

Until now, my punk history hasn’t been the subject of my scholarship, which is in the main concerned with liberal war, and liberal empire. But recent flurries of academic and popular inquiry into punk and riot grrrl have pulled me into their orbit. I’m somewhat conflicted about becoming an object of study, but I am coping by co-organizing an upcoming symposium with my amazing colleagues Ruth Nicole Brown, Karen Flynn, and Fiona I.B. Ngô, called “Hip Hop and Punk Feminisms: Theory, Genealogy, Performance.”

- Excerpt from POCZP touring member Mimi Thi Nguyen's interview with The Feminist Wire!

Thanks for the shout out, Mimi! <3

Learn more about the upcoming symposium “Hip Hop and Punk Feminisms: Theory, Genealogy, Performance.”

If you haven’t already, be sure to read Race Riot #1 & #2 <3

_____________________

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

I love the POC Zine project and have been following it ever since I first heard about it. It’s inspired me to get my ass off the ground and get to writing!—Ifeoma Okoye, MancsterCon organizer, UK

From Ifeoma, via our Facebook in-box:

I’m organising an indie sequential art convention in Manchester called MancsterCon and I was wondering if you could do a shout out for any UK based POC zinesters who might like to come and exhibit or share/sell their wares. I really want to show something truly revolutionary and vibrant and also to meet other self aware POCs with a passion.

The event is linked here: https://www.facebook.com/events/382751535157845/

I would really appreciate it - I love the POC Zine project and have been following it ever since I first heard about it. It’s inspired me to get my ass off the ground and get to writing!

Anyway all the best and thanks for reading.

Thanks for the love, Ifeoma! <3 Ifeoma is POC and wants to connect with more POC artists/zinesters and allies of all stripes in the UK and beyond.

We’re looking forward to learning more about MancsterCon! 

Follow MancsterCon on Facebook

"MancsterCon is a convention showcasing the best in indie sequential art in the North West. Whether you’re into comics, manga, graphic novels, animation or anime, it doesn’t matter - this convention is just for you!

It’s going to be held at a brilliant location: the Northern Quarter’s very own Manchester Digital Laboratory (or the MadLab as it’s known on the streets).” 

Tu eres mi otro yo (You are my other me)

Si te hago daño a ti (If I do harm to you)

Me hago daño a mi (I do harm to myself)

Si te amo y te respeto (If I love and respect you)

Me amo y me respeto yo (I love and respect myself)

My Other Me by Luis Valdez (via alannaspeak)

<3 #reblogforever

March 8th & 9th, 2013: Inclusivity at CZF 2013

chicagozinefest:

An anonymous survey taker said in regards to CZF’s inclusivity: I think organizing a poc-specific zine branch of any kind is too much like segregation, even if the organizers’ hearts were in the right place. It’s not inclusion to specify the skin color of authors and it was already an extremely welcoming place to be for everyone involved, making the poc zine thing redundant.


CZF response: There may be some misunderstanding about the POC zine groups that were present/involved in Chicago Zine Fest 2013, so we wanted to clear that up. Two groups tabled at/participated in CZF that had POC in their names: the POC Zine Project, and Chi-POC. Both of these groups are self-identified and named themselves as well as providing their own bios with self-identifications to be read in introduction at the Exhibitor Reading, and they are autonomous entities that are not associated with the CZF organizers; we would never presume to categorize or label anyone! We support both groups and the rights of all zinesters who self-identify as POC to do so, as well as the reasons behind each group’s choice to use POC in their names and do what they do.

We highly recommend checking out both of these projects to find out more about them in their own words:

POC Zine Project: poczineproject.tumblr.com

Chi POC: onstruggling.tumblr.com

*We will be publicly responding to a few of the anonymous comments made in our Post CZF 2013 Participant/Attendee Survey here over the next couple of weeks in order to foster transparency and dialogue. Please contact us if you have any comments or questions!

We appreciate CZF organizers putting this statement out there. We had a great time  presenting and tabling at CZF, while affirming & supporting zinesters of color. Advocacy engines/platforms for poc zinesters will never be “redundant” as long as institutional racism exists in zine & DIY communities - oh yes, and in everything else. #boom #muchlove

- POCZP

"I’m also really eager to see what People of Color (POC) Zine Project is bringing. They’re based out of the Bronx and do really important work in bringing non-whites to the forefront of zine communities. This is something that AZF Is highly lacking, and I really appreciate their presence this year."—Amanda Mills, co-founder and organizer of Atlanta Zine Fest

Source: clatl.com

Atlanta Zine Fest 2013

POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano will be tabling on behalf of POC Zine Project at the inaugural Atlanta Zine Fest on June 8 and 9. The table will feature a selection of POCZP zine partner titles, as well as some zines, art and jewelry by local ATL zinesters of color. <3

Be sure to stop by the POCZP table to purchase a fresh copy of Mixed Up! A zine about Mixed-Race Queer & Feminist Experience (you can read and download here for free as well), selections from Free Poet’s Press and be sure to get your issue of masConsumption before we run out of copies!

We’ll also have limited edition POCZP buttons for sale/trade! <3

Judith (see her latest call for submissions to Tom Girl zine here), a local POC zinester, will be tabling with POCZP in Atlanta.

Judith Jones is a writer, blogger, zinester and feminist. She contributes to the online magazine Inconnu and she blogs at Simple But Chic. She can be contacted at pigsthatfly.tumblr.com or simplebutchic247@gmail.com.

From Judith:
I will be bringing issue one and two of Tom Girl and artist trading cards. Also, I’ll bringing a few pieces of my dad’s jewelry to sell. It’s handmade. I’m  also bringing various button rings and earrings that I made by myself. 

POCZP will also be joined by Chantelle Kodua, an environmental enthusiast who enjoys working on various DIY projects in her spare time. When she isn’t out saving the world, by digging recyclables out of trash cans, she can be found spending copious hours on tumblr. She can be contacted at chantellephone.tumblr.com.

Daniela is attending Atlanta Zine Fest on behalf of POCZP to connect with the zine community and local zinesters/writers/publishers/artists of color in preparation for the POCZP tour date in Atlanta in October.

POCZP is sharing tabling space with local zinesters of color, as part of our advocacy to make zines by people of color easy to find, distribute and share.

If you are interested in collaborating with POCZP in Atlanta, contact poczineproject@gmail.com. We are especially interested in hearing from artists/zinesters/activists of color and white folks interested supporting POCZP’s efforts.

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh


"Thank you for bringing the joy of reading back to my life!" - Xicana Aguila on FB

#whywedothis #weloveourcommunity
If you identify as a person of color and you&#8217;re working on a zine - or have one you&#8217;d like to share on our platforms - let us know! Email poczineproject@gmail.com with any questions &lt;3 Please allow 3-5 days for a response.
 
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ABOUT POC ZINE PROJECT
POC Zine Project’s mission is to makes ALL zines by POC (People of Color) easy to find, distribute and share. We are an experiment in activism and community through materiality.
ABOUT THE RACE RIOT! TOUR
POC Zine Project held it’s first-ever Race Riot! Tour, producing 20 events in 14 cities, which included speaking engagements at six universities. Our time at the University of Maryland was part of the tour. Click here to view photos from the POC Zine Project: 2012 Race Riot! Tour tour finale at Death By Audio in Brooklyn and access all the tour stop recaps.
STAY INFORMED
We will be taking the Race Riot! tour through 14 more cities in 2013. 
Facebook.com/POCZineProject
Twitter.com/poczineproject
poczineproject.tumblr.com
SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT
If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour and the poverty zine series.
DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh
You can also send well-concealed cash or a check! Email poczineproject@gmail.com for details or if you have questions.
Info about the poverty zine series: http://bit.ly/RLVTVt

"Thank you for bringing the joy of reading back to my life!" - Xicana Aguila on FB

#whywedothis #weloveourcommunity

If you identify as a person of color and you’re working on a zine - or have one you’d like to share on our platforms - let us know! Email poczineproject@gmail.com with any questions <3 Please allow 3-5 days for a response.

 

—-

ABOUT POC ZINE PROJECT

POC Zine Project’s mission is to makes ALL zines by POC (People of Color) easy to find, distribute and share. We are an experiment in activism and community through materiality.

ABOUT THE RACE RIOT! TOUR

POC Zine Project held it’s first-ever Race Riot! Tour, producing 20 events in 14 cities, which included speaking engagements at six universities. Our time at the University of Maryland was part of the tour. Click here to view photos from the POC Zine Project: 2012 Race Riot! Tour tour finale at Death By Audio in Brooklyn and access all the tour stop recaps.

STAY INFORMED

We will be taking the Race Riot! tour through 14 more cities in 2013. 

Facebook.com/POCZineProject

Twitter.com/poczineproject

poczineproject.tumblr.com

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

You can also send well-concealed cash or a check! Email poczineproject@gmail.com for details or if you have questions.

Info about the poverty zine series: http://bit.ly/RLVTVt

immigrants, poor people, queer people of color, disabled folks, women (esp trans women of color) and gender-nonconforming folks if you are in academia and you don’t feel smart enough, remember that you are in the playground and training grounds of the elite. academia was not designed to include you. you are surviving something that has been systemically designed to exclude you in order to keep power in the hands of white, middle class, able bodied cis-men.


knowing this, don’t let academia train you to believe that elitism is the right way to make it through school. you can learn shit, hold the knowledge of your people in your heart, discard shame for your humble beginnings and/or marginalized identities. move through this experience knowing that the changes it offers you don’t have to include accepting academic elitism, inaccessible language or superiority. you can can simultaneously own the privilege that comes with being college educated and connections to your roots. academia does not have to kill your spirit.

fabian romero- indigenous immigrant queer boi writer, facilitator and community organizer (via fabianromero)

——

THIS. THIS FOREVER. POC zinesters have gone on to navigate the complex underbelly of the academy. Their writing - before, during and after academia - inspires many of us. 

A zine can be just as transformative as an academy-approved text. Don’t be afraid to share your truth.

 

"amazing initiative. keep it up. reading these zines with outspoken poc voices have empowered me and given me even more motivation to write my stories and continue the discussions." — Jane Porter, Zsa Zsa Zine

Community,

We get messages like these every day through Tumblr, Twitter, Facebook, and via email.   Thank you for your support and positive thoughts. We are all creating culture together, and our own liberation.

Our vision for 2013 is to keep doing what we’re already doing: exploring the possibilities of activism and community through materiality — in spaces digital and physical.

There’s so much more to see and do. Let’s embrace our hopes and fears and make it happen … together.

xo Daniela Capistrano

Founder, POC Zine Project

ABOUT JANE PORTER

Jane, who contacted us through Facebook looking for physical copies of Race Riot #1 and #2 (we’re hooking them up!), is part of Zsa Zsa Zine, a queer feminist zine/comic library collective based in Amsterdam.

Zsa Zsa Zine is “a space for zinefreaks, comicfans, zinesters, artists, and every one else who loves comics, zines, coffee and cupcakes. You can watch, read, draw, write, paint, cut & paste, eat, drink, hang out ( or over) or even fall a sleep! We like to focus on (self identified) women, queers and feminist comic and zine artists but of course everyone interested is super welcome!”

Location: Fort van Sjakoo, Jodenbreestraat 24, centre of Amsterdam

Say Hi: zsazsazine@squat.net

—-

ABOUT POC ZINE PROJECT

POC Zine Project’s mission is to makes ALL zines by POC (People of Color) easy to find, distribute and share. We are an experiment in activism and community through materiality.

ABOUT THE RACE RIOT! TOUR

POC Zine Project held it’s first-ever Race Riot! Tour, producing 20 events in 14 cities, which included speaking engagements at six universities. Our time at the University of Maryland was part of the tour. Click here to view photos from the POC Zine Project: 2012 Race Riot! Tour tour finale at Death By Audio in Brooklyn and access all the tour stop recaps.

STAY INFORMED

We will be taking the Race Riot! tour through 14 more cities in 2013. Stay tuned!

Facebook.com/POCZineProject

Twitter.com/poczineproject

poczineproject.tumblr.com

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

You can also send well-concealed cash or a check! Email daniela@dcapmedia.com for details or if you have questions.

Info about the poverty zine series: http://bit.ly/RLVTVt

Happy New Year!

Love,

POC Zine Project