POC ZINE PROJECT

Posts tagged Suzy X

RECAP: POC Zine Project & Girls Rock Camp collaboration in 2013

We appreciate the love:

"Working with the POC Zine Project was a total pleasure. The workshops that they presented at Willie Mae Rock Camp for Girls were inspiring, engaging, radical and fun (a perfect combo), and the youth were psyched about the ‘zines they created with POCZP.

Also, Daniela is wicked organized, which made the planning process a dream. Willie Mae Rock Camp for Girls is excited to continue working with and supporting POC Zine Project!”—Emmet Moeller, Program Director, Willie Mae Rock Camp for Girls

How did we end up collaborating with folks who are part of Girls Rock Camp Alliance? Find out below! <3

POCZP's workshop at Bay Area Girls Rock Camp 2013: Savannah_Cheesing

[DESCRIPTION: Savannah smiles at POCZP’s zine workshop during Bay Area Girls Rock Camp's Girls Rock After School Program (GRASP) in January of 2013. Photo credit: Gabby Miller]

2013 was POCZP’s first year collaborating with two Girls Rock Camps on POC Zine Project-led youth zine-making workshops that also incorporated accessible histories of POC creators from the 1700s-today. 

[DESCRIPTION: Watch this video to learn more about The Girls Rock Camp Alliance]

POCZP wanted to experiment with partnering with GRCA because several of our touring members have had positive experiences volunteering & teaching through GRCA across the country. Osa Atoe (Shotgun Seamstress zine series) and Suzy X (Shady Hawkins) are just a few zinesters/musicians of color who have supported GRCA with their time, energy and talents. 

POCZP’S RECAPS FOR 2013 GIRLS ROCK ZINE-MAKING WORKSHOPS

POCZP's workshop at Bay Area Girls Rock Camp 2013

[DESCRIPTION: A mini-zine/pocket zine made at our Oakland workshop by a young anon <3]

POCZP’s first step in our ongoing, collaborative process was doing a workshop with Bay Area Girls Rock Camp in Oakland, California, USA, the last week of January. This came about because POCZP founder Daniela attended an LGBTQ pride event in Oakland in September of 2012, where she met Bay Area Girls Rock Camp organizer Gabby Miller. After they connected, Gabby invited POCZP to lead youth zine-making workshops during their next Girls Rock After School Program (GRASP) session in 2013.

Daniela coordinated with POCZP west coast coordinator/touring member Mariam Bastani, who donated her time to lead the workshops at no cost. She also brought Kat, a volunteer (thanks Kat!). The sessions happened through GRASP in Oakland, CA, on 1/19 and 1/21, 2013. 

Here’s a peek at one of the workshops in real-time:

[DESCRIPTION: ENDLESS YUM from Bay Area Girls Rock Camp on Vimeo]

Mariam’s recap, in her own words:

I was coming at it through music, since we were at rock camp. The younger kids were really into it. The teen workshop was attended by a ton of workers and we played some punk and showed a video of the aABC No Rio Zine Library.
Punks and activists are the ones who have had zine libraries for years and those are the examples I used to focus on the DIY nature of zines. Presenting punk as another of many DIY options is just where I come from. I was showing commonalities within groups that want to express themselves and that zines are accessible/ another DIY option.
Here are some more photos from both sessions, provided by Gabby (thanks!):

BAY AREA GIRLS ROCK CAMP TESTIMONIAL

Each day there were 30 participants in the workshop. Tuesday was 3rd through 6th graders, and thursday was 7th to 12th graders. GRASP is the Bay Area Girls Rock Camp's “Girls Rock After School Program”. They were an hour long each. Very short, but the beginnings of something! 

Each day Mariam and Kat brought a ton of examples of different ways to make zines (big fold-out art zines, itty bitty zines, one page zines), and then showed us how to make a one-page zines. The students then got to make their own and spent the majority of the hour working steadily on their zines while Mariam and Cat helped them learn the folding and cutting techniques, and showing them more examples.

At the end of the hour we were lucky to have the time for a AWESOME zine readings where a wide range of zines were introduced to the world - titles included:

- “Endless Yum” 
- “Everyone can be a family” 
- “Eyes Understand” 
- “Cute Animals” 
-” Where’s Oprah?”

it ruled! - Gabby Miller, Bay Area Girls Rock Camp

NEXT STEPS: POCZP founder Daniela and west coast coordinators will be meeting with Bay Area Girls Rock Camp organizers this month to discuss ongoing collaborations for during & after #RaceRiotTour.

About Bay Area Girls Rock Camp

Bay Area Girls Rock Camp is a nonprofit dedicated to empowering girls through music, promoting an environment that fosters self-confidence, creativity and collaboration. It is part of the Girls Rock Camp Alliance. 

Girls Rock After School Program (GRASP) is a 10-week program for girls 8-18 years old. Students attend instrument lessons, form a band, collaboratively write an original song, participate in exciting workshops, and perform with their band at a live showcase. All ability levels are welcome; no musical experience is necessary. Applications in Spanish are available upon request.  

To sign up, go to www.bayareagirlsrockcamp.org and fill out an online application, or call to request a paper application: (510) 267-1808.  Applications in Spanish are available upon request.

GRASP is located at Malonga Casquelourd Center for the Arts in downtown Oakland @ 1428 Alice Street.

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We <3 Brooklyn  

Leah is 8 1/2 years old at our #poczines session at @williemaerockcamp #zines

[DESCRIPTION: Leah is ‘8 1/2’ years old and made a mini-zine in homage to Willie Mae Rock Camp for Girls at our #poczines session on August 21, 2013. Photo credit: POCZP]

We love it when all the stars seem to align in support of POCZP being a part of young people finding their voice in fun and transformative ways…

Your workshops were some of our campers’ favorites, and we were thrilled to have you and your co-presenters there talking about ‘zine making in communities of color. 

It was a pleasure working with you, and I hope that Willie Mae Rock Camp can support POC Zine Project in other ways going forward - let me know if there’s anything we can do to help!—Emmet Moeller, Program Director, Willie Mae Rock Camp for Girls via email to POCZP

On August 20 and 21, 2013, POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano and facilitators Suzy X (POCZP touring member), Patricia Rogers (masConsumption) and POCZP’s longtime ally Kate Wadkins led four zine-making workshops with young people ranging in ages from 8 - 17. These sessions took place at this year’s Willie Mae Rock Camp for Girls’ Girls Rock! Camp. Session 2 was held at Cathedral High School in Midtown Manhattan, and the showcase was held at Roulette in Downtown Brooklyn. 

Here are some rad photos from our sessions, which our followers on Instagram (@poczineproject) saw in real-time: 

[Description: 31 photos taken by POCZP founder Daniela at Willie Mae Rock Camp for Girls’ 2013 Girls Rock! Camp with her smartphone]

How did this collaboration come about? Simple! Emmet Moeller, Program Director, attended our zine workshop (in collaboration with MOONROOT and Dr. Adela C. Licona) at this year’s Allied Media Festival in Detroit. Emmet then quickly reached out to Daniela about POCZP doing PAID sessions, in support of our #RaceRiotTour fundraising efforts (it makes a huge difference when people include/make space for us in their programming budgets!). Because we were offered payment, we were able to temporarily devote resources away from #RaceRiotTour planning to workshop logistics. We had so much fun with the young folks as part of this year’s Willie Mae Rock Camp for Girls events!

IMG_2676
[DESCRIPTION: One of the many creative zines made during POCZP’s sessions at the 2013 Willie Mae Rock Camp for Girls]

Here’s Daniela’s recap, in her own words:

I’m looking forward to exploring what long term collaboration will look like between Girls Rock Camp Alliance and POCZP. The workshops were a lot of fun; I always enjoy helping young people find their voice through their own materiality and sharing knowledge.

I liked the diverse mix of young people and voices; none of the white youth reported that they felt excluded or silenced because we celebrated zines by POC (it’s white ADULTS largely who react this way) and were very respectful and open to what was being discussed. Their positive participation and energy was an important factor in the success of the workshops. I’m keeping this brief so you’ll read the other recaps below! <3

Here’s Suzy X’s recap, in her own words:

This was my 5th summer volunteering at Willie Mae—and it was an excellent one, because I had the opportunity to teach kids about zines! As a group that’s never lived in a time without the Internet, some campers were skeptical of using zines as a medium of expression. “I have a blog,” some said, “I can just type in it from my phone!” 

In remembering my own first websites—hosted on the now defunct Geocities and Angelfire—Daniela and I discussed the value of keeping physical versions of our work, as our favorite blogs and hosting sites are always under the threat of turning over. While blogs are great for putting your ideas out into the world, journals, sketchbooks, and zines make great personal and cultural artifacts. 

That said, many campers took really well to the idea of the zine, crafting their own mini-zines about topics like gender, body image, and corporate greed—or just plain positive write-ups about their own bands. Some even took a more experimental angle, such as the class of 9-year olds who competed with each other to make The World’s Smallest Zine, the kids who made zines within zines and a girl who made an “abstract” zine with nothing in it. Some of the best, most inspiring work comes from total noobs with little experience, and that’s what makes self-publishing such an important tradition to sustain.

[Description: 41 photos taken by Kate Wadkins at Willie Mae Rock Camp for Girls’ 2013 Girls Rock! Camp]

Here’s Patricia Rogers’ recap, in her own words:

I feel so lucky to have been given the opportunity to co-lead the zine workshops. I started the zine because I wanted to do something that called for collaboration and I wanted to help give young artists and creators a voice.

Ever since starting masConsumption, early this year, I have been able to work with such amazing people, put on amazing events and learned a lot. However, I haven’t felt the kind of fulfillment I felt after working with the girls at the Willie Mae Camp.

Sometimes I forget why I got into this in the first place and working with them reminded me. Seeing these ladies express themselves, learning and collaborating. The excitement they had to just be able to learn a skill that can help them for the rest of their lives.

I know they won’t all grow up to become zine editors but teaching them how to make a mini zine with just one piece if paper will be so rewarding for them. These young girls are growing up in such a technology based world and I think being able to be crafty and write or physically draw their feelings and imagination.

I am really excited about future mentorship and being a resource for those young creative and artistic ladies.

Here’s Kate Wadkins’ recap, in her own words:

When Daniela Capistrano approached me to collaborate on a workshop at Willie Mae Rock Camp for Girls, I couldn’t be more enthusiastic in my reply—POC Zine Project and Willie Mae are two of my favorite organizations in New York and I felt honored to be a part of it. Daniela and I have been collaborating on events since 2010, and I’ve also worked with Suzy X before: I invited her to show some of her comics in an art show I co-curated in 2011, called BIG MOUTH: Contemporary Feminist Voices in Art + Illustration. Patricia Rogers of masConsumption Zine was new to me and I was really excited to see what we’d come up with all together.
We approached this workshop with a free-form attitude: Daniela would lead us in with a history of people of color in zines, offering knowledge we lack both in school AND in zine culture, one example being that Black women like Ida B. Wells used this format for years to combat oppression. Then, she’d tell each group a bit about why POC Zine Project exists, and how the kids individually could access the media that POC Zine Project makes available. Then, we make zines. 
As a white woman, a good portion of this workshop was listening, for me. Daniela, Suzy and Patricia all shared their stories as women of color media-makers and discussed the various institutional structures they’ve come up against in their personal, scholarly, artistic AND political lives. While these women are collaborators (and friends) of mine, I was offered a chance to learn more about why they do what they do, and why zines are so crucial to their own artistic processes.
As I was only able to co-lead the morning sessions, I worked with campers ages 10-16 (younger girls attended the afternoon sessions). What I witnessed was amazing! I wasn’t surprised, though, because every time I watch youngsters given the opportunity to make zines, they do something incredible. These 10-16-year-olds bore their hearts out on paper, with markers, pens, Sharpies and collage. They wrote about heartbreak, identity politics, racism, and sexism. Some of them wrote about roller derby or how they just don’t like people. Many of them came up with their own fun and innovative ways to creatively bind their finished zines.
One thing struck me while watching these girls cut up newspapers and magazines to create their own art: this workshop empowered them to literally and physically subvert mainstream media. A lot of us in the zine community see this as a primary function of zines, but it was extra powerful to watch young girls engage in this process in a tangible way.

How did we feel after collaborating with folks from Girls Rock Camp Alliance? Judge for yourself in the photos below…<3

Photo by @kwadkins: POCZP after our first #poczines workshop at @williemaerockcamp NYC #zines

[DESCRIPTION: (L to R) Daniela Capistrano, Patricia Rogers, Suzy X and Kate Wadkins. Photo by Jamie]

Happy #poczines facilitators at @williemaerockcamp: (l to r) @msmalcriada @kwadkins and poczp founder Daniela

[DESCRIPTION: (L to R) Suzy X, Kate Wadkins & POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano at Willie Mae Rock Camp for Girls 2013]

COMMUNITY: Interested in incorporating POCZP into your programming schedule? We are open to discussing possible collaborations after #RaceRiotTour.

Please send us an email with “POCZP collaboration” to poczineproject@gmail.com, which we’ll categorize as a general inquiry and follow up by December 1, 2013. Please note “URGENT” in the subject line as well if you are interested in partnering in January of 2014.

We offer free services to grassroots orgs who don’t have operating budgets. We require payment from orgs with funding. Thank you for your support. You can learn more about our services on the #RaceRiotTour page.

ABOUT THE GIRLS ROCK CAMP ALLIANCE

The Girls Rock Camp Alliance is an international 501(c)3 coalition of organizations whose shared mission is to empower girls and women using the tools of music education to foster self-esteem and confidence. To this end, the GRCA promotes, strengthens, and expands services provided by its affiliated camps. GRCA provides resources and networking opportunities for its member camps, and promotes the establishment of like-minded institutions worldwide.

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

ZINE SPOTLIGHT: BROS FALL BACK (2013)
RELEASE: May 2013
ORIGIN: Philly, PA
AUTHOR: &#8220;The Secret Society of Femmes&#8221;
HOW TO BUY/ACCESS: Contact antieverythingshows@gmail.com directly for instructions on how to get a copy of the print version.
READ BROS FALL BACK NOW!
This is the print view version (only one available online) so it&#8217;s best viewed in full-screen mode.

POC ZINE PROJECT REVIEWS BROS FALL BACK
By Suzy X, POCZP touring member
Hi zinesters! Last month I had the pleasure of reading at Ladyfest Philly, where I read/performed from my middle school diaries. I was in great company, and many laughs (and tears) were shared.
But being the only author of color at the reading left me a little confused; there are actually plenty of POC doing radical, D.I.Y work in Philadelphia alone, and not enough of them were at this event! Hopefully next year&#8217;s zine reading can be a better reflection of that.So on that note, a new zine that I&#8217;m absolutely enamored with is BROS FALL BACK, a zine recently written by some QPOC based in Philly known as &#8220;The Secret Society of Femmes.&#8221;
Rather than resorting to the classic declaration of &#8220;girls to the front!&#8221; BROS FALL BACK takes a more intersectional approach to combating hetero-patriarchy in D.I.Y. and punk spaces. This shift in focus allows more room for those who are not &#8220;girls&#8221; nor &#8220;bros,&#8221; but are still fair game under white male supremacy.
The zine also delves into the racist and capitalist dynamics within punk culture, illustrating the slippery slope that starts with a new DIY space and ends with gentrification.
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[IMAGE DESCRIPTION: Suzy X holds her copy of BROS FALL BACK. Photo credit: Suzy X]
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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT
If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.
DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

ZINE SPOTLIGHT: BROS FALL BACK (2013)

RELEASE: May 2013

ORIGIN: Philly, PA

AUTHOR: “The Secret Society of Femmes”

HOW TO BUY/ACCESS: Contact antieverythingshows@gmail.com directly for instructions on how to get a copy of the print version.

READ BROS FALL BACK NOW!

This is the print view version (only one available online) so it’s best viewed in full-screen mode.

POC ZINE PROJECT REVIEWS BROS FALL BACK

By Suzy X, POCZP touring member

Hi zinesters! Last month I had the pleasure of reading at Ladyfest Philly, where I read/performed from my middle school diaries. I was in great company, and many laughs (and tears) were shared.

But being the only author of color at the reading left me a little confused; there are actually plenty of POC doing radical, D.I.Y work in Philadelphia alone, and not enough of them were at this event! Hopefully next year’s zine reading can be a better reflection of that.

So on that note, a new zine that I’m absolutely enamored with is BROS FALL BACK, a zine recently written by some QPOC based in Philly known as “The Secret Society of Femmes.”

Rather than resorting to the classic declaration of “girls to the front!” BROS FALL BACK takes a more intersectional approach to combating hetero-patriarchy in D.I.Y. and punk spaces. This shift in focus allows more room for those who are not “girls” nor “bros,” but are still fair game under white male supremacy.

The zine also delves into the racist and capitalist dynamics within punk culture, illustrating the slippery slope that starts with a new DIY space and ends with gentrification.

——————-

[IMAGE DESCRIPTION: Suzy X holds her copy of BROS FALL BACK. Photo credit: Suzy X]

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

Scene Report (POC Zine Project edition): L.A. Zine Fest 2013

Here are some moments from our first tabling and panel experience as invited guests at L.A. Zine Fest on February 17, 2013:

1. When we arrived at the Ukrainian Cultural Center and were impressed with the space

2013 L.A. Zine Fest exterior

2. L.A. collaborator Chula Doula posing with flowers before assisting us with POCZP tabling needs (Thanks, Pati!)

Chula Doula will be at our table today #lazinefest #poczines

Pati Garcia is a Certified Sexological bodyworker/Somatic Sex Educator, self-identifies as genderqueer/fluid two spirit of Peruvian-Mexican descent, loves to dig feet in the earth and throw love into the cosmos. Pati holds space for life unraveling and unwinding as a birth doula. Pati follows only the spirit led path and refuses to compromise pleasure for any reason at all. Radical feminist doula bodyworker, workshop facilitator. Wanna see your cervix?? Ask her how.

3. When Cristy C. Road, Suzy X, Chula Doula and Mariam Bastani all tabled together at the same time <3

Cristy C. Road, Suzy X, Chula Doula and Mariam Bastani tabling at #poczines table at #lazinefest 2013

Osa Atoe (Shotgun Seamstress) isn’t in this shot because she was reading during the Mend My Dress Press panel. Tomas Moniz (Rad Dad) was tabling elsewhere but joined us for the POCZP minutes after this photo was taken. POCZP founder Daniela was taking photos with her weird camera, which she will be replacing (sorry for the fuzz y’all).

Here is what Tomas had to say about his first experience collaborating with POCZP at an event:

Two and half hours is pushing it for a bad Hollywood movie; so when I realized the POC Zine Project workshop at this year’s L.A. Zine Fest lasted that long and the crowed remained attentive, invested, engaged throughout all six presentations, I was shocked.  But this fact demonstrates exactly how vital and important the event was!

I’ve attend and participated in many readings, but this one was special; this one was with people who have inspired me for years, Cristy C. Road and Mariam from MRR, as well as people who’s work is some of the best stuff out there today, Suzy X’s Malcriada and Osa Atoe’s Shotgun Seamstress; I also got the chance to thank the founder of the POC Zine Project organizer, Daniela, for keeping alive some of the zines that inspired me as I entered my own critical consciousness and keeping these important resources available for those who come after us.

4. Getting to know our tabling neighbors, such as Thi Bui and her son (who is also an artist!)

Meet our tabling neighbor Thi Bui and her son! thibui.com #poczines #lazinefest

Thi Bui was born in Saigon, raised in California and schooled in New York. She teaches high school and has a little boy and a husband. She have been hard at work, writing and drawing a graphic novel called THE BEST WE COULD DO. It is a 15-chapter immigration epic about her parents, their place in history, and her search for her place in her family.

5. When Mariam and other folks from Maximumrocknroll joined the POCZP table with more issues featuring punks and activists of color

POCZP founder @dcap and Mariam from MRR at #lazinefest #poczines

POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano (L) and Mariam Bastani (R)

Maximumrocknroll is a widely distributed monthly fanzine dedicated to supporting the underground punk rock scene. MRR’s 25-year plus history and large, obsessed all-volunteer staff has made its punk rock coverage the most consistently up-to-date and reliable around. Subscribe here or purchase individual issues here.

 

6. Quese IMC participating during our panel and speaking about #IdleNoMore (thanks again, Quese IMC! xoxoxo)

Quese IMC at the #poczines panel at #lazinefest discussing #idlenomore

Quese IMC had this to say immediately after the event:

I had a really good time. I enjoyed myself. Was good for me to see a different perspective and meet some cool people. Look forward to hearing from you and definitely keep me updated what you have in mind for the tour…

We are in the process of figuring out how Quese IMC can join us during the 2013 Race Riot! Tour to help share information about #IdleNoMore actions in the Canada, U.S., and around the world. Stay tuned for updates …

7. When our panel at the Moth Theatre quickly became over capacity, and we had to scramble to find additional seating/make space (all great problems to have!)

@shotgunseamstress Osa Atoe speaks during the #poczines panel at #lazinefest

 Osa Atoe reading at L.A. Zine Fest

Suzy X reading at #lazinefest #poczines photo by @raddadtomas Tomas Moniz

Suzy X reading at L.A. Zine Fest (C) while Osa (L) and Mariam (R) observe

This was Suzy’s second time reading as part of a POCZP event. Osa’s commentary afterward? “Suzy is hilarious.” We agree! Check out her latest zine, Malcriada. Suzy will also be joining us next month for Chicago Zine Fest, woo! <3

Here is what Suzy had to say about her time with POCZP at L.A. Zine Fest:

I was so honored to join the POC Zine Project last week at LA Zinefest! Our panel on Sunday afternoon brought up a lot of feelings for me, as the new girl in a scene of bad-ass POC in zines. It’s really mind-blowing how long it took for someone to finally initiate a project like this, a project that centers the voices of people of color in DIY publishing. I discussed my experience— a baby feminist living in a conservative household in the South, without access to any zines, much less zines by POC, until I attended college. And after hearing all these wonderful folks speak, I felt terribly late to the party, because they had been going at it for years! And doing a damn good job of it, too.

I’m incredibly thankful for the initiative Daniela has taken in bringing us all together. But in going forward, I think a conversation should happen in which we discuss access to those who don’t belong to punk scenes or those who don’t live in urban or densely-populated areas. This project was started to shed light on the history of POC in zines; but I am interested in working on ways to make this history available and accessible to more people. This could mean partnering up with existing distros or starting one by and for POC! Whatever works you know? And I’m excited to continue these conversations during the zine tour in Fall 2013.

Suzy X was delighted to find out after sending this recap that POCZP has been engaging in this conversation with folks for years. POCZP’s first zine partner, SlushPilePress, is located in a remote area of Eugene, Oregon (no longer operating) and our present zine distro partner is Brown Recluse Zine Distro. We also support zine partners who aren’t a part of our touring.

Our poverty zine partner Carey Fuller is based in Kent, WA, which is also an undeserved area. Our Legacy Series initiative (ongoing) is all about making independent publications by POC from decades past accessible. We don’t organize to center punk experiences, although we do have some collaborators who ID as punk. We have a lot going on <3.

COMMUNITY: If you are located in the midwest and/or rural areas without much support for independent publishers, email poczineproject@gmail.com we can discuss ways to partner. <3

Just some of the over capacity crowd at #poczines panel during #lazinefest 2013 <3

Just one section of our over capacity audience - it was so great to meet many of the attendees afterward!

Cristy C. Road speaks at #lazinefest during the #poczines panel

 Cristy C. Road reading at L.A. Zine Fest

8. Reconnecting with POCZP West Coast collaborators like Liz Mayorga

Pati aka Chula Doula (L.A.) and Liz Mayorga, zinester and artist (Bay Area) #lazinefest #poczines

Chula Doula (L) and Liz Mayorga (R) at dinner after L.A. Zine Fest

Liz  is a writer / illustrator from Southeast LA.  She grew up watching old, Black and White, Mexican films and selling burritos with her family.  The films were her inspiration.  The tacos and burritos paid for college.  She used to work with teenagers, and they taught her what it means to be brave.  Their energy and fearlessness inspired her to write and draw for herself, but she ends up creating for them too. 

Liz is now an MFA Writing Student at CCA, where she writes both fiction and nonfiction, milks the Illustration department for all they’re worth, and experiences an existential crisis every day.  Despite the hard work and many sleepless nights, she is extremely grateful to read, write, and draw. She thanks you for your support.

Liz is helping us with tour fundraiser events on the West Coast between now and October. If you’re interested in supporting POCZP West Coast initiatives, send us a message: poczineproject@gmail.com.

9. Helping more folks discover zines by people of color

#lazinefest 2013

We met so many rad people at L.A. Zine Fest and will be reaching out to everyone who signed our mailing list in the coming weeks. <3

10. Meeting (in person!) & collaborating with more inspiring zinesters of color like Tomas Moniz 

Tomas Moniz and Suzy X from #poczines POCZP at #lazinefest

Tomas Moniz (L) and Suzy X (R) at the POC Zine Project table at L.A. Zine Fest on February 17, 2013

Tomas Moniz is the founder, editor, and a writer for the award winning zine Rad Dad. Looking for radical parenting community, he created Rad Dad to provide the space for parents (particularly fathers) to share, commiserate and plan with each other, and to support each other in challenging patriarchy one diaper at a time. As China Martens has said, “Tomas has been the most vocal voice within zines, trying to start and keep a discussion within this aspect of radical politics and parenthood.” His writing has been included in many zines about parenting as well as in the books My Mother Wears Combat Boots and Don’t Leave Your Friends Behind.

This event marks the first time Tomas participated in a POCZP panel. We’re looking forward to connecting with him at Chicago Zine Fest next month and discussing ongoing collaborations!

A HUGE thank you to L.A. Zine Fest organizers Meredith Wallace and  Rhea Tepplim for all their help, as well as to everyone who volunteered at the fest. <3

Our panel was recorded and we are in the process of tracking down video so we can share it with you all.

COMMUNITY: Did we meet you in person at L.A. Zine Fest? Tell us about your experience exploring our tabling area or what you thought about our panel discussion. Submit your thoughts here or email poczineproject@gmail.com (all voices welcome, including white folks <3). 

We’ll update this recap with more reactions and photos from POCZP members and L.A. Zine Fest attendees in the coming days.

POC Zine Project’s 2013 ‘Race Riot! Tour’ Dates & Cities

Community,

Last year’s inaugural tour was amazing but that was just the beginning. 14 cities last year = 12 more cities this year <3 

Dates may shift slightly before October and we are still accepting invites from academic and community spaces, collectives, orgs and individuals. If you haven’t contacted us already, please do: poczineproject@gmail.com.

If you look at this list and think “Why the heck do they keep missing the full Midwest?” Don’t trip, chocolate chip. The 2015 NATIONAL Zinester Conference is going down in YOUR house! Yeah! Midwest all the way! And we’ll be bringing in FIVE international zinesters/activists to share their work! Yeah, buddy! If you want to help, reach out! 

Thoughts become things. Be intentional with your thoughts.

2013 TOUR DETAILS: What we know so far

Native/Indigenous solidarity will be a core component of this tour. If you’re actively involved in local efforts in your city, please reach out. We want you to speak at our events & help you distribute your printed zines/materials nationwide. We hope our small platform helps to make a difference.

We will be doing TWO events in each city, just like last year's tour. There will be an academic event at a participating university in the daytime and one DIY/community show in the evening. The academic events will be free and open to the public, while the evening DIY shows will be a sliding scale cover. NO ONE TURNED AWAY FOR LACK OF FUNDS <3

The DIY show covers pay for our gas and food, so give what you can.

We will be able to share accessibility/child care details for each city once we have more information.

The Race Riot! touring member lineup will be revealed in the coming weeks. HINT: Think more people, rotating members and lots of guest readers in each city.

Self-care and caregiving resources will be a significant aspect of this tour for participating readers/performers.

OK, enough context. Here are the dates & cities (all subject to change)!

[SEE UPDATED LIST ON OUR #RACERIOTTOUR PAGE]

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All details subject to change. We will share specifics about each city as we finalize tour logistics.

MICHIGAN FOLKS: Wow, such love! We’ve received a few requests from y’all to come out this year. We did two events there in 2012 and cannot return in 2013 (we are not a funded entity - we rely on donations and have day jobs/other obligations <3). If you’re in Michigan and want to support this tour in other ways, contact us, thanks.

We can only do so much, and we do a lot with very little. Richmond, VA and other cities: We wish we could be everywhere for this tour, but we can’t. Let’s figure out ways to partner that will yield long term outcomes for local POC orgs and collectives. Thanks for understanding.

OTHER WAYS TO PARTICIPATE

We are looking for the following:

  • Guest readers in every city (you must be a person of color)
  • Rotating tour buddies: Join us on the road and participate in 1-3 tour events as a panelist/reader/tabler
  • POC (or POC fronted) bands to perform at each #raceriottour event!
  • More POC & ally tablers for each city: come to a POCZP event in your town and table for your zine/org/collective/creative project (check out some of the POC artists/merchants who tabled last year) <3

We’re also looking for folks to help us produce #raceriottour fundraiser events between now and September. This might be a good solution for you if you are unable to travel.

Contact poczineproject@gmail.com for more details. Make sure to use “2013 RACE RIOT TOUR” as the email subject.

ABOUT THE RACE RIOT! TOUR

POC Zine Project held its first Race Riot! Tour in 2012, producing 20 events in 14 U.S. cities, which included speaking engagements at six universities. Click here to view photos from the POC Zine Project: 2012 Race Riot! Tour tour finale at Death By Audio in Brooklyn and access all the tour stop recaps.

We will be taking the Race Riot! Tour through 12 more U.S. cities in 2013. Stay tuned for updates as we work on partnering with POC-affirming orgs overseas. If you are outside the U.S. and want to be a part of our emerging POCZP Global Ambassadors program, email poczineproject@gmail.com. 

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh