POC ZINE PROJECT

Posts tagged academia

Hello, I am a researcher from Wichita, KS. I am researching and writing my master's thesis about DIY Feminism and Zines in the Midwest. I am looking for collections that represent Midwest issues and activism as opposed to the plethora available on coastal affairs and activism. Do you believe you have anything that might help me please let me know! Thank you so much! Lorelei Lockner, lorelei.lockner@gmail — Asked by Anonymous

Dear Lorelei,

We’re confused as to why you are asking POC Zine Project to help you with your research for your master’s thesis - specifically, why you are contacting an advocacy platform for people of color and asking people who aren’t presently being paid to do this advocacy … to take on additional free labor for you.

Yes, asking POCZP to suggest zine collections that represent Midwest issues and activism for you IS labor. It involves research, curation and emailing you a detailed response. But the bigger problem with your question is that it’s entirely self-serving … at our expense.

Your request doesn’t include any offer of mutual support. It is a perfect example of the problematic requests we receive from grad students (usually white folks) all the time: ”Please research something for me for free or give me access to your institutional knowledge so that I can use it in my master’s thesis. I’m not going to offer you anything in return, but would be really grateful if you took on additional labor to help me with this thing I’m working on that doesn’t center POC. okbai!”

Since we’re taking the time to respond to this publicly, and others will see this response, we will also take the time to mention how easy it would have been to Google “midwest zines by people of color.” One of the top results is Joyce Hatton. You didn’t specify you were looking for zines by POC anyway, but since that is who we serve, we’ll recommend two POC zinesters from the midwest who collaborate with POCZP:

1) Joyce Hatton, POCZP Midwest Coordinator (yup, same person you would have found through a simple web search)

2) Chaun Webster, POCZP Midwest Coordinator & founder of Free Poet’s Press 

If you want to contact them directly, they can decide for themselves if they want to help you. We can’t and won’t speak for them. If you are serious about finding zines that represent Midwest issues and if you care about including POC voices (you didn’t indicate if you did), these are two people you should feature.

It’s important for us to state this publicly: It’s incredibly problematic that you didn’t mention Joyce or Chaun in your message (clearly a generic copy/paste inquiry you sent to multiple sources), which implies you didn’t do any real research on POCZP before contacting us. It would have been as simple as checking our TEAM page.

At this point we’re unfortunately used to grad students like you assuming we have the time to do the work you should be doing on your own.

We understand that in responding to you, we are helping you. But hopefully we are also sharing more evidence of how people in the academy are often completely oblivious to how their “innocent” requests for help are actually a form of colonial behavior.

Instead of just looking for collections - a pile of data to sift through - you should also be looking for PEOPLE in the midwest: zine librarians, zine fest organizers, and people like Joyce and Chaun. PEOPLE can help you find the zines you are looking for. 

You could have found Joyce and Chaun (midwest folks who make zines) on your own if you had taken two seconds to do your own research on POCZP before contacting us. 

This question was submitted over a month ago, so perhaps you already found what you are looking for. But hopefully this response helps you think first before you contact a POC-led org to do free labor for you without any offer of support in return.

- POCZP

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2014. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to ongoing advocacy costs, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

We are rebooted our org structure in 2014 and will be transparent about that process. Stay tuned.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT: Meet POCZP’s 2013 #RACERIOTTOUR Driver Tracey Brown <3

Community,

We shared the mistakes we made during last year’s #raceriottour (view prezi) so that we would set a new standard for this year’s tour. In response to feedback, POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano prioritized Native/Indigenous Solidarity, self-care and caregiving for this year’s tour planning process.

Mainstream artists tour with their own wellness teams. People who plan corporate-sponsored tours understand the importance of having such a team in place. Tracey Brown is one of several #RaceRiotTour support team members we’ll be announcing in the coming days …

POCZP'S 2013 #RACERIOTTOUR DRIVER TRACEY BROWN 1 of 2

[DESCRIPTION: Tracey Brown. Photo credit: Tracey Brown]

ABOUT TRACEY BROWN, 2013 #RACERIOTTOUR DRIVER & MEDIATION SUPPORT

Tracey’s role on the #raceriottour is critical. In partnership with POCZP founder Daniela, Tracey is managing travel logistics/vehicle operations through our journey to 20 cities across the US. She will be the dedicated tour driver for the duration of the entire tour (with routine breaks from the POCZP support team).

Tracey will also provide (along with others on tour) mediation support as conflicts arise (they do! and it’s OK). 

POCZP founder Daniela met Tracey at the 2012 Anarchist People of Color convergence in New Orleans and was impressed with her organizational skills and her coalition building with the Ovarian Psyco-Cycles. This is the origin of the collaboration.

Without Tracey’s support coordinating rental logistics, this tour would not be happening.

Tracey, in her own words:

Born and raised in New Orleans, LA, Tracey is a community organizer
and survivor. With her love for the New Orleans POC community guiding her, she graduated from University of Hawaii at Manoa in 2009 with a dual degree in Psychology and American Studies.

Upon returning to her hometown, she became involved in various social justice endeavors such as bike accessibility, food justice, anti-racism work, housing justice, and anything else she could get involved in and help create accountability to and visibility of the local POC community. Among these undertakings was the collective organization of the 2012 Anarchist People of Color convergence in New Orleans.

Tracey currently works at the New Orleans Food Co-op while she
prepares to apply to graduate school in order to obtain her Master’s
degree in Community and Clinical Psychology. She also works with NOLA to Angola, an anti-PIC organization that provides a long-distance, solidarity bike ride to raise funds for the Cornerstone Builders’ Bus Project, the only bus service that provides free monthly rides to low-income families who have loved ones in one of the five Louisiana detention facilities. 

Tracey intends to use her experience organizing with various groups and her time with POCZP to create accountable, accessible, multidimensional community building, and POC driven community mental and spiritual health healing.

We’re so excited to collaborate with you, Tracey! <3 - POCZP

POCZP'S 2013 #RACERIOTTOUR DRIVER TRACEY BROWN 2 of 2

[DESCRIPTION: Tracey Brown. Photo credit: Tracey Brown]

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We will be sharing the full #raceriottour lineup of cities and dates on September 1, 2013, and will be rolling out more tour member announcements in the coming days.

Thanks for your patience! We are a 100% volunteer entity and are producing a national tour in our spare time.

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goals for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

FROM OUR IN-BOX: Mini-Comics As A Way Of Rethinking Pedagogy

"I loved your last note about POC zines and the academy. I’m a Cuban-American mini-comics cartoonist, and I’m finishing my dissertation on using mini-comics as a way of rethinking pedagogy.

I’m going to be serializing my dissertation in the form of mini-comics as I finish each chapter. I don’t know if you get a lot of emails or requests for help from POC doing academic work, but I’d be happy to help in any way (well, in non-exploitative ways).

It’s been a lonely academic experience for me with few (if any) resources for Latin@s in academia, if I could ever be a resource for anyone (in a capacity other than an object of study), please let me know. I’d also love to donate my dissertation to a digital archive for POC students and scholars when I’m finished with it.” — jarodrosello.com

Thanks so much, Jarod! We’ll be in touch.

- POCZP

A response to people in the academy contacting us looking for ‘research subjects’

We don’t function to serve the academy, even though several POCZP allies move between worlds in academia. If you approach us to help you with “finding” POC for your “research” - whether you are POC or not - please be respectful. 

Don’t make assumptions about what you are owed as an academic. We don’t owe you anything. And if you are only contacting us for help with your “research” and not offering any support in return, it’s already a problematic exchange.

It is your responsibility to convince us why we should take the risk of introducing you to anyone within the POCZP community for your research purposes, and to then respect our decision when we decline (or choose) to connect you with people/collectives/etc. 

There is plenty of documented history of grad students & others in the academy culture vulturing on Tumblr and elsewhere and we want nothing to do with that. 

We don’t want anything to do with that if you are white or POC, because class issues are also a huge part of the related oppressions & exploitations that arise.

We are not a research buffet. We are human beings. Come correct, please. In your inquiry to POC Zine Project, make sure to consider the following:

1) What will encourage more people to help you (both as participants and to connect you to people) is to reveal as much as possible about yourself as you feel comfortable with, i.e. related links, a bio, some background on your experience as a POC (if you are POC) and how that informs your studies and career/activist path, etc. 

2 Consider if the roles were reversed, and what sort of language would inspire you to reach out to yourself. 

3) Consider what you can offer participants in return beyond being a part of your dissertation. What’s the incentive to open up their lives for your research?

If you are bold enough to include a photo of yourself, that will definitely result in more responses. Visual cues remind people of your human side. 

A photo of yourself will make it less intimidating for folks in our community who have a bias against those in the academy for various (often legitimate) reasons. If people can identify with you, they will contact you directly. 

We are not responsible for managing your relationships or advocating on your behalf.

4) Will your dissertation be available online, and approximately when? 

5) Can POCZP archive a print copy of it and also help share a digital version of it? 

6) Would you be willing to create a zine-version of your dissertation? We can support you in this process, if you’re interested.

7) Be nice. Remember, we don’t owe you anything. 

- POCZP

immigrants, poor people, queer people of color, disabled folks, women (esp trans women of color) and gender-nonconforming folks if you are in academia and you don’t feel smart enough, remember that you are in the playground and training grounds of the elite. academia was not designed to include you. you are surviving something that has been systemically designed to exclude you in order to keep power in the hands of white, middle class, able bodied cis-men.


knowing this, don’t let academia train you to believe that elitism is the right way to make it through school. you can learn shit, hold the knowledge of your people in your heart, discard shame for your humble beginnings and/or marginalized identities. move through this experience knowing that the changes it offers you don’t have to include accepting academic elitism, inaccessible language or superiority. you can can simultaneously own the privilege that comes with being college educated and connections to your roots. academia does not have to kill your spirit.

fabian romero- indigenous immigrant queer boi writer, facilitator and community organizer (via fabianromero)

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THIS. THIS FOREVER. POC zinesters have gone on to navigate the complex underbelly of the academy. Their writing - before, during and after academia - inspires many of us. 

A zine can be just as transformative as an academy-approved text. Don’t be afraid to share your truth.

 

COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT: Mimi Thi Nguyen, Golnar Nikpour and more at ‘Punk Anteriors’ event TONIGHT

POC Zine Project tabling at Jan. 31, 2013 event

We know some of you are bummed that this rad event is 1) far away from you and 2) 21+. We hear ya. Sometimes it seems like all the cool shit is in NYC, right? But that’s just not the case. We know from our travels that people are doing amazing things all over the world, including in small towns.

But this amazing thing is actually going down in NYC tonight, so if you can make it, show some love and stop by our table and For The Birds Collective’s! POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano will be there in solidarity with Mimi and the other readers, along with our Chief Fanalyst Julia B. and Race Riot! tour vet Cristy C. Road.

We’ve been thinking about all the people who can’t afford to purchase Women & Performance’s “Punk Anteriors” special double issue (it’s $85) or attend tonight’s event, so we’ve snagged a copy and made it available to read online, zine-style. <3

We’re also going to live-tweet when we can from @poczineproject using the hashtag #PunkAnteriors. Look for our tweets! <3

“Punk Anteriors: Theory, Genealogy, Performance” is issue 22.2-3 of Women & Performance: a journal of feminist theory and was co-edited by Beth Stinson and Fiona I.B. Ngô.

The issue emphasizes punk feminist spaces and times by bringing them to the forefront to forge and generate “punk anteriors.” We use the word “anteriors” in the title of this issue to think through the included articles that specifically address punk spaces and remnants—plotting what might come before, or anterior to, the telling of punk’s stories in two senses. First, punk anteriors point to the temporal, interrogating punk’s (always seemingly) resistant genealogy and questioning the source of politics and performances for punk. Second, we mobilize punk anteriors in the material and spatial sense of place, bodies, and archives. That is to say, we re-consider the context for the everyday performances of punk as occurring within atmospheres of imperial design; racial, feminist, and anarchist social movements; and immigration, poverty, and dislocation. 

Along with the hope of re-centering people of color in punk’s narratives, part of the goal with this issue has been to expand the places where we find valuable knowledge and aesthetics, to re-imagine who counts as an intellectual producer in punk’s history, and to work across genres.  Though the process was not always perfect, we have found this track productive and insightful, and hope that this model might inspire others to explore these topics and others in similar and even more brilliant ways.

COMMUNITY: After reading “Punk Anteriors,” let us know what you think! Click here to submit your review of excerpts of the journal or the entire publication.

EVENT DETAILS

Big thanks to tonight’s organizers for creating punkanteriors.tumblr.com/ and making this roundtable discussion as accessible as possible to the general public.

We also want to give an especially BIG thank you to this issue’s co-editors Beth Stinson and Fiona I.B. Ngô <3 Thank you for disrupting problematic facets of academia in your own ways.

Women & Performance’s “Punk Anteriors” special double issue release party

Thursday, January 31, 2013
@ The Gallery at Le Poisson Rouge
on Bleeker St b/n Thompson and Sullivan

6pm doors // 6:30pm start // 21+ // bands first

Aye Nako, Mon Mecs, and a roundtable discussion panel w/ Tavia Nyong’o, Mimi Nguyen, José Muñoz, Golnar Nikpour, M.J. Zilla, and the co-editors.

Also, zine tabling by the POC Zine Project and for the birds collective.

FREE!

For more venue information, please visit:
http://www.lepoissonrouge.com/lpr_events/women-performances-punk-anteriors-double-issue-release-party-jan-31st-2013/

RSVP on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/events/178101808980490/?fref=ts

BIOS

Aye Nako

http://ayenako.org/

Mon Mecs

See M.J. Zilla below

José Muñoz

Muñoz is Professor of Performance Studies at New York University, where he writes, researches and teaches Comparative Ethnic Studies, Queer Theory, Marxism, and Performance Art. His books include Disidentifications: Queers of Color and the Performance of Politics (Minnesota, 1999) and Cruising Utopia: the Then and There of Queer Futurity (NYU Press, 2009). Muñoz has published articles on punk, art, queer theory, critical ethnic studies, poetry, and performance art in venues such as Women & Performance: A Journal of Feminist TheoryGLQSocial TextTheatre JournalThe South Atlantic QuarterlyAmerican Quarterly, and Criticism.

Mimi Nguyen

Nguyen is Associate Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies and Asian American Studies at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Her first book, called The Gift of Freedom: War, Debt, and Other Refugee Passages, focuses on the promise of “giving” freedom concurrent and contingent with waging war and its afterlife (Duke, 2012). She is also co-editor with Thuy Linh Nguyen Tu of Alien Encounters: Popular Culture in Asian America (Duke, 2007), and co-editor with Fiona I.B. Ngo and Mariam Lam of a special issue of positions on Southeast Asians in diaspora (Winter 2012). She publishes also on queer subcultures, the politics of fashion, and punk feminisms. She is the author of Slander and Evolution of a Race Riot zines and has contributed her writing to Punk Planet and Maximum Rocknroll. In 2012, she went on a couple POC Zine Project/Race Riot! Tours to discuss and read from zines by people of color.

http://mimithinguyen.com/

Golnar Nikpour

G. S. Nikpour served as co-coordinator of Maximum Rocknroll — the longest running DIY punk fanzine in the world — from 2004-2007. She is also a founding editor ofB|ta’arof, a magazine featuring art, historiography, and cultural critique related to Iran and its diaspora. She was born in Tehran, Iran and lives in NYC where she still writes for MRR, plays drums in a hardcore band called In School, and is a PhD candidate researching Iranian political modernity at Columbia University.

Interview

Tavia Nyong’o

Nyong’o is Associate Professor of Performance Studies at New York University, where he writes, researches and teaches critical black studies, queer studies, cultural theory, and cultural history. His first book, The Amalgamation Waltz: Race, Performance, and the Ruses of Memory (Minnesota, 2009), won the Errol Hill Award for best book in African American theatre and performance studies. Nyong’o has published articles on punk, disco, viral media, the African diaspora, film, and performance art in venues such as Radical History ReviewCriticismTDR: The Journal of Performance StudiesWomen & Performance: A Journal of Feminist Theory,Women’s Studies QuarterlyThe Nation, and n+1. He is co-editor of the journal Social Text.

http://nyongo.wordpress.com/

M.J. Zilla (aka Mec Jagger)

Former co-producer/songwriter/front woman for The Slack Republic. A visionary extraordinaire she launched her own boutique music label, wynott records (former Rxlngr) in 2007 and has since managed artists such as Muhsinah, Jneiro Jarel & 00Genesis and consulted other acts like J*Davey, Viktor Duplaix & Dante Fried Chicken. While she continues to expand her brand designing YNA, her product line which debuted at the 2012 Afro-Punk festival, M.J. is quietly writing, producing and recording the debut solo release of her new indie-rock outfit, “Mon Mecs” with plans to also release a several rap songs early this year under the moniker “Mec Jagger.”

http://mecjagger.com

POC Zine Project

Meet POCZP’s first Legacy Series intern: Itoro Udofia!

EDIT: Itoro Udofia: First dedicated intern for POCZP's Legacy Series (Spring 2013)

NAME: Itoro Udofia

ROLE: First dedicated intern for the POC Zine Project’s Legacy Series

REGION: West Coast, USA

COMMUNITY: Join us in welcoming Itoro! You’ll be seeing her contributions manifest on this Tumblr and in other digital and physical spaces very soon …. <3

Bio: Itoro is a first generation writer, artist, and educator of Nigerian origin living in the Bay Area. She develops programs for youth of color (Youth Programs Associate at the Museum of the African Diasporawhere they have a space to honor their histories and thrive. You can find her writings on Your World News, People of Color Organize, Rain and Thunder: A Radical Feminist Journal, Womanist Musings, and her own blog Thoughts of my Mind. Her writings focus on the intersections and dynamics of race, class, gender, power, survival/healing and education.

She also teaches an African History course and when she is not doing that, she works closely with a community organization dear to her heart, working to abolish the school to prison pipeline and hearing the youth speak their truth to move to action. She is happy to be a Bay Area resident and feels like here, she has found a bit of peace and a bit of home!

Itoro’s excited to be an intern with the POC Zine Project because it is a collective that uplifts and cares about what people of color have to say and acknowledges what they have always said.

Some texts that furthered her political consciousness and commitment to uplifting the voices of POC and their struggles are The Revolution Starts at Home, This Bridge Called My Back and Steve Biko’s I Write What I Like: Selected Writings. All these zines and texts named what it means to speak out from the margins and hold to ones principle in building a world that includes us all, and calls for a life of love and continued struggle in ALL our spaces, seen and unseen. Moreover, with many people coming out from the margins, she did not feel alone.

Ultimately, Itoro hopes to be a part of a larger community committed to making our written word available, accessible and visible. Other perks to the internship are gaining more knowledge and organizing with radical zinesters. As an intern, she hopes to further her knowledge about zine culture and help get our Voices out. She is excited and ready to begin this journey and is happy to call the POC Zine Project her media home.

COMMUNITY: Learn more about POCZP internship & volunteer opportunities here. We are still accepting applications for the Summer and Fall sessions. 

IN ITORO’S OWN WORDS

Here are some excerpt from her application that are important to share:

Zine culture, specifically the material production of our knowledge is important to me because our voices are often co-opted, misused or completely erased in the literary canon. I have experienced this dangerous and painful trend most profoundly as an educator within the context of radical and progressive education. Save for bell hooks, Sonia nieto, Michele Foster and a few other people of color directly explaining the intricacies of power and privilege as a teacher of color, outlining a liberatory pedagogy through navigating a hostile terrain and offering something invaluable to the field through articulating underlying race, class and gender dynamics, it was difficult to fully relate to radical literature. I found that much of its thought and analysis was filtered through a white liberal/radical context. Even the class analysis was lacking because the white elephant in the room, white supremacy, was not directly dealt with. These power dynamics alone, the dynamics of who gets listened to, who controls the written word, who controls the publishing house, the way information gets told is what fuels my commitment to writing and working with people of color to have complete autonomy over their material.

… The POC Zine project is necessary at this particular time where knowledge and overall experiences are actively ignored.  Centering people of color’s material contributions as a source of  is important, and is a part of honoring a larger history of people who kept going in spite of these hurdles.  

SOME OF ITORO’S WRITING

In a Quiet Place, A Radical Profeminist (Fall 2012)  

In a Quiet Place, The Black Feminist Manifesto (Fall 2012)

In a Quiet Place, Your World News (Fall 2012)  

Missy Anne’s on the lookout for me, Your World News (Summer 2012)  

And When You Leave, Take your Pictures with you, Your World News (Spring 2012) 

Black Power, Leadership and Privilege, Your World News (Winter 2012)

Shedding the Tears, Looking Back, Moving Forward, People of Color Organize (Winter 2012) 

Conversations with a Student Teacher of Color, Womanist Musings (Fall 2010) 

ABOUT THE LEGACY SERIES

Kicking off with FIRE!!, POC Zine Project will make zines by people of color created from the 1700s-1990s available to read and share.

Every Friday (Editor’s note: date pushed to February), you will find a legacy zine by a person of color on poczineproject.tumblr.com. We will share more details in 2013.

WHY WE ARE FOCUSING ON LEGACY ZINES

People of color in the U.S. have produced independent publications (zines) for decades. Many of these zines were political in nature, creating cracks in the lens of white supremacy that shaped (and continues to inform) popular culture and legislation.

These zines were new maps to our liberation, countering the negative propaganda of what people of color looked like, thought and were capable of achieving.

We want the world to know about these legacy zines, so we are going to archive and share them to the best of our ability.

We look forward to partnering with distros, academic spaces, libraries, anti-authoritarian collectives, literary journals, bloggers and more to share the Legacy Series.

"NEW" ZINESTERS: We will still share information about new and upcoming zines by people of color :) Please continue to submit your zines to the archive.

ABOUT THE RACE RIOT! TOUR

POC Zine Project held its first Race Riot! Tour in 2012, producing 20 events in 14 cities, which included speaking engagements at six universities. Click here to view photos from the POC Zine Project: 2012 Race Riot! Tour tour finale at Death By Audio in Brooklyn and access all the tour stop recaps.

We will be taking the Race Riot! Tour through 14 more cities in 2013. Stay tuned!

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

You can also send well-concealed cash or a check! Email daniela@dcapmedia.com for details or if you have questions.

Info about the poverty zine series: http://bit.ly/RLVTVt

COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT: [NYC] A FREE symposium to discuss how to end global sexualized violence THIS FRIDAY 1/25/13
DATE: January 25, 2013
TIME: 8:30 am to 5:00&#160;pm EST
LOCATION: Columbia University Medical Center Bard Hall 50 Haven Avenue
REGISTER: here.
Contact Info: For further information regarding this event, please contact Gerald Govia by sending email to gg2431@mail.cumc.columbia.edu or by calling 2123424542.
***pre-registration is required to attend***
EVENT DETAILS
New York—The Women’s Media Center and Columbia University&#8217;s Mailman School of Public Health on Friday are sponsoring a free symposium to discuss how to end global sexualized violence.
“Global sexualized violence: From epidemiology to action” will bring together scientists, journalists, and policy makers. Robin Morgan, co-founder of the Women’s Media Center, will give the plenary address. Lauren Wolfe, director of WMC’s Women Under Siege project, will moderate two of the sessions. The project has been a leader in bringing attention to sexualized violence against women in war-torn areas.
Speakers will include award-winning journalist Maria Hinojosa;Cristina Finch, director of the women&#8217;s human rights program at Amnesty International USA; Cara Hoffman, author of the critically acclaimed So Much Pretty; and representatives from the Centers for Disease Control, the Peace Corps, and Physicians for Human Rights, among other organizations.
The symposium is one of a series of sessions hosted by Columbia University’s Epidemiology Scientific Symposia (CUESS) to look closely at epidemiology and population health.Pre-registration is required.
More details are available at CUESS.org.
The Women&#8217;s Media Center works to make women and girls visible and powerful in the media through strategic programs aimed at transforming the media landscape including media training, media monitoring and activism, original media content, media reports, and media programs and initiatives. The organization was founded in 2005 by Jane Fonda, Robin Morgan, and Gloria Steinem.
CONTACT: Cristal Williams Chancellor, Media Relations Manager, cristal@womensmediacenter.com or 202-587-1636.
&#8212;&#8212;-
Point of awareness: womenundersiegeproject.org

COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT: [NYC] A FREE symposium to discuss how to end global sexualized violence THIS FRIDAY 1/25/13

DATE: January 25, 2013

TIME: 8:30 am to 5:00 pm EST

LOCATION: Columbia University Medical Center Bard Hall 50 Haven Avenue

REGISTER: here.

Contact Info: For further information regarding this event, please contact Gerald Govia by sending email to gg2431@mail.cumc.columbia.edu or by calling 2123424542.

***pre-registration is required to attend***

EVENT DETAILS

New York—The Women’s Media Center and Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health on Friday are sponsoring a free symposium to discuss how to end global sexualized violence.

“Global sexualized violence: From epidemiology to action” will bring together scientists, journalists, and policy makers. Robin Morgan, co-founder of the Women’s Media Center, will give the plenary address. Lauren Wolfe, director of WMC’s Women Under Siege project, will moderate two of the sessions. The project has been a leader in bringing attention to sexualized violence against women in war-torn areas.

Speakers will include award-winning journalist Maria Hinojosa;Cristina Finch, director of the women’s human rights program at Amnesty International USA; Cara Hoffman, author of the critically acclaimed So Much Pretty; and representatives from the Centers for Disease Control, the Peace Corps, and Physicians for Human Rights, among other organizations.

The symposium is one of a series of sessions hosted by Columbia University’s Epidemiology Scientific Symposia (CUESS) to look closely at epidemiology and population health.Pre-registration is required.

More details are available at CUESS.org.

The Women’s Media Center works to make women and girls visible and powerful in the media through strategic programs aimed at transforming the media landscape including media training, media monitoring and activism, original media content, media reports, and media programs and initiatives. The organization was founded in 2005 by Jane Fonda, Robin Morgan, and Gloria Steinem.

CONTACT: Cristal Williams Chancellor, Media Relations Manager, cristal@womensmediacenter.com or 202-587-1636.

——-

Point of awareness: womenundersiegeproject.org

RELEASE: The Mimi Thi Nguyen Collection in Collaboration with the POC Zine Project

In the summer of 2012, POC Zine Project partnered with Mimi Thi Nguyen to facilitate her donation of over 60 poc zines created in the 1990s to NYU’s Fales Library.

Mimi's #poczines donation at Fales!

Here is the donation statement in its entirety, along with a list of the zines that were donated.

FALES LIBRARY DONATION STATEMENT

The Mimi Thi Nguyen Collection in Collaboration with the POC Zine Project

January 13, 2012

By Mimi Thi Nguyen

As a zinester and a scholar, it is an odd thing to be both an object of the archive and an interlocutor with them. Or, as the case might be, it is an odd thing to be both an object whose presence is perceived through absence and an interlocutor called upon to enact its retrieval.

The story of this donation follows from just such an absence and call when my collaborator Daniela Capistrano, founder of the POC Zine Project, noted that archivist Lisa Darms’ upcoming manuscript on the Riot Grrrl Collection at the Fales Library –about which Darms’ tweeted, with an invitation to propose materials to include— could not address some of the most important zines by women of color, because at the time almost none of these zines are found in the archive. (It bears noting that the collection depends upon donations, and Darms’ does not purchase zines for the collection.)

In a Twitter exchange, Capistrano encouraged Darms to continue including zines by women of color lest an important but much under-observed contribution to the story continue to be subsumed to a “big picture” of riot grrrl as feminist movement. At the same time, Capistrano contacted me to compile some of those zines for a collaborative donation to the Fales Library. As the mission statement for POC Zine Project states, the archive and access to it are central: “POC Zine Project’s mission is to makes ALL zines by POC (People of Color) easy to find, share and distribute. We are an experiment in activism and community through materiality.”

Lisa Darms exchange, August 2, 2012

There are two issues that concern us —myself, and Capistrano at the POC Zine Project— in general: For the first, we argue that the archive is not just a place for study, but must be itself an object of it. What is in the archive, and how did it get there? What are the criteria for assembling, organizing and presenting materials? Who selects and collects, shapes and donates their stories to an archive? What is not there? How do these materials and absences produce knowledges, including norms and teleologies?*

It is stating the obvious to observe that no archive is an authoritative source for grasping a record of the past; we know from postcolonial studies in which the archive is demonstrably an artifact of colonial frames that the story the archive –any archive— tells is provisional, partial. For this reason, some who are concerned with history making aim to create a more full archive, excavating from the cracks and fissures those stories and persons identified as absent (of course, this requires the recognition that absence matters).

But the second question I wish to address here is bigger than just what is in the archive, and how a donation like this one might “correct” an absence— it is for me a concern about how the archive, the absence, and the excavation tell another, useful story.

Such bigger stories are about feminist historiography –how do we tell the story of feminist movement and teleology, and the place of women of color? I want to suggest that a donation from my collection and the POC Zine Project does not necessarily address the underlying troubles for feminist historiographies of riot grrrl movement. As the narrow scope of liberal multiculturalism has by now taught us, it is that inclusion and incorporation might be made to cover over more troubling queries about how women of color are included, incorporated, or otherwise made visible. I am thinking of feminist archives or retrospectives that too often “hold a place” for women of color to say their piece, but in such a way that contains their critique and segregates it from the story of the movement’s contribution.

We can see this logic operating in retrospectives of riot grrrl in which the story of race is contained as a chapter, or a part of a chapter, in its history, when it appears at all. Here then I cite Anjali Arondekar, whose For the Record considers these questions with regards to sexuality in the colonial archive: “The critical challenge is to imagine a practice of archival reading that incites relationships between the seductions of recovery and the occlusions such retrieval mandates. By this I mean to say: What if the recuperative gesture returns us to the space of absence? How then does one restore absence to itself? Put simply, can an empty archive also be full?” That is, it may be that the problem is not just a matter of historical invisibility (in this case, of people of color in punk subcultures) that would otherwise be corrected with further excavation and more visibility.

The problem is this: Through what stories do absences become visible, and manageable? And does filling up that absence somehow hide the important stories that absence might tell us – about history-making, knowledge-making, movement-making? I wondered then, as I was pulling together zines by women of color (pre-1996) for this donation, how an almost-empty archive might lend greater substance to the story of epistemic violence that erases or otherwise contains our presence.

As I have said elsewhere, the archive is a political and cultural meaning making machine for the passage of objects into what Michel Foucault calls knowledge’s field of control and power’s sphere of intervention, and for “minor” objects in particular, we know well how troublesome such a passage might be. At the same time, myself and Daniela here wish to posit another historiographical gesture. That is, what if we refuse the emplottment of absence and subsequent redemption-through-presence that would render women of color as mere addition or supplement to the archives? What if the intervention –like this donation— becomes the story to tell about them?

The donations made from my collection in collaboration with the POC Zine Project and in conversation with Lisa Darms at the Riot Grrrl Collection is both a critique (broadly construed) and an alternate chronicle taking up questions about race and coloniality that cut across assumed feminist histories, investments and teleologies.* These pre-1996 selections from my collection point to not a side story in riot grrrl movement, but the story of encounter and contest, exchange and challenge – denoting not the singularity of riot grrrl movement, but its slide by other feminisms, fracturing and multiplying into other worlds.

Again, as I have said elsewhere (and repeatedly on the first POC Zine Project/Race Riot! Tour in 2012), those other histories of people of color —here represented in the materials we donate together— are not an interruption into a singular scene or movement but the practice of another, co-present scene or movement that conversed and collided with the already-known story, but with alternate investments and forms of critique. These other stories of riot grrrl in particular and also punk at large unfolding enact historical and theoretical provocations with which we have yet to reckon.**

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* I am grateful to my graduate research assistant Ariana Ruiz for the hours she put in copying and creating an inventory for the zines.

** Some of the material adapted here for this statement comes from Mimi Thi Nguyen, “Afterward,” in Punkademics: The Basement Show in the Ivory Tower, edited by Zack Furness, New York: Minor Compositions/Autonomedia, 2012, 217-223; and Mimi Thi Nguyen, “Riot Grrrl, Race, and Revival,” in Women & Performance special issue “Punk Anteriors,” edited by Elizabeth Stinson and Fiona I.B. Ngô, 22:2-3 (July-November 2012); 173-196.

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Here is the full list of zines created by POC in the 1990s that were donated:

Behind These Fragile Walls #1

Boredom Sucks #8.5

Borelando

Broken Thought #1 and #2

Cage #1, #2 and #3

Chica Loca 2

Chinese, Japanese, Indian Chief

Consider Yourself Kissed #2

Cyanide #1

Eracism #1 and #2

Evolution of a Race Riot

Exedra #4

Funeral #1 and #2

Hey Mexican!

Hey White Girl

Hijinx Zine #1

Hollyhock 3/War 1

Hollyhock #4.5

Housewife Turned Assassin! #2 and #4

Juryrig

Kreme Koolers #2 and #4

Mamasita #4

Marks in Time: The Very Early Go-Gos’s

Messy Flowers 3/Lolita

Mestiza

Mija

My Broken Halo #2

Oppression Song #1

Photobooth Toolbox 2

Please Don’t Hit Below The Belt!

Pure Tuna Fish #1, #6, #8, #9 and #10

Race Riot 2

Race Riot Project Directory

Scarbaby

Screaming Goddess #1 and #4 (zine and artwork)

Secret Agent Girl no. 666

Suburbia 8/ Tennis and Violins #2

Tennis and Violins 

The Bakery

Totally Fucked Up #1

Wild Honey Pie #9 and #10

You Might as Well Live #4, #5, #8 and #9

Superette #12

ywap! #13

YOU ARE RACIST WHITE PUNK BOY

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Mimi also gave an identical donation to the POC Zine Project and all titles will be a part of the Legacy Series mapping project. If you are interested in accessing digital copies of any of these zines, send us a message.

A duplicate donation was also made to the Barnard Zine Library (details coming soon).