POC ZINE PROJECT

Posts tagged advocacy

Hi! I am taking a course at UMASS Amherst titled African American Woman's Fashion in the Diaspora with Professor Tanisha Ford. I just wanted to ask ya'll's advice on any zines by WOC out there that are specifically about fashion/critically engaging adornment. I want to do my final project on the course about WOC who adorn themselves in alternative fashion(s). I thought ya'll might have some good suggestions thank you for reading and keep up the AMAZING work. <3 A Fellow WOC and supporter — Asked by verodeaqui

Hi there! Thanks for reaching out. You’ve raised a question that has renewed our interest in archiving fashion-related zines by POC. Presently we don’t have anything like what you’re looking for in the archive.

We put a call for support on Facebook and Twitter and so far people have been recommending blogs, not zines.

Here are the blogs that folks recommended:

Beck Levy: not a zine but this dc style blog by Not-too Shabby DeRoberts is rad: http://divacity.tumblr.com/

Amber Fellows: http://www.npr.org/blogs/pictureshow/2011/07/07/137651983/photo-history-the-fashions-of-women-of-color

Susan A. Rohwer: It’s not a zine per-say but it is a blog made by WOC about fashion/critically engaging adornment: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Threadbared/97922323220

We know you are looking for zines specifically about fashion/critically engaging adornment by WOC, so ….

COMMUNITY: If you have any fashion zines by POC to recommend, please reblog with your answer AND/OR submit your suggestions. You can also email daniela@dcapmedia.com.

We want to add fashion-related zines by POC to the archive ASAP (we pay for zines to support POC creators), so thanks with your help reaching this goal.

do you all do an online distro? — Asked by Anonymous

Hi Anon,

Thanks for writing. No, we are not an online distro. Our focus is on being an advocacy platform and publishing original zine series that are developed to affect change within specific communities by partnering with individuals and organizations already doing great work.

We (among other things) spotlight zines and zine distros by people of color on our digital platforms and through zine partnerships during events, such as our recent 12-city tour. 

During the Race Riot! tour, we had a Race Riot! Mall (long table/s) filled with zines by people of color available to all attendees for purchase, with many of them for free.

If you are looking to purchase zines by people of color, let us know where you’re located so we can recommend IRL sources as well as online ones.

Browse our archive tag for recommendations. This tag reflects some of the zines we purchased and/or received as donations for our archive.

This is what Twitter activism looks like:
Advocacy comes in many shapes and forms. Since POC Zine Project is an all-volunteer organization and most of us have day jobs (often multiple gigs), we do our best to incorporate advocacy into what we do each day (while practicing self care).
Part of our advocacy includes supporting the inclusion of zines by people of color within upcoming anthologies and other round ups of works covering DIY, Riot Grrrrl and punk communities.
Yesterday we noticed that Lisa Darms @LisaDarms, Founder of the riot grrrl collection at @faleslibrary NYU, shared a tweet about her upcoming book of Riot Grrrl ephemera for The Feminist Press at CUNY.
We offered to send her a list of zines by people of color, hoping she would include them in her new book. Lisa responded right away! 
We&#8217;re optimistic that this book (unlike several from the past) will make sure to include information about people of color who contributed/are contributing to Riot Grrrl culture and we&#8217;re looking forward to helping make this happen.
P.S. Sometimes we get really excited about Riot Grrrl and add extra R&#8217;s. Rrrrrrrr.

This is what Twitter activism looks like:

Advocacy comes in many shapes and forms. Since POC Zine Project is an all-volunteer organization and most of us have day jobs (often multiple gigs), we do our best to incorporate advocacy into what we do each day (while practicing self care).

Part of our advocacy includes supporting the inclusion of zines by people of color within upcoming anthologies and other round ups of works covering DIY, Riot Grrrrl and punk communities.

Yesterday we noticed that Lisa Darms @LisaDarms, Founder of the riot grrrl collection at  NYU, shared a tweet about her upcoming book of Riot Grrrl ephemera for The Feminist Press at CUNY.

We offered to send her a list of zines by people of color, hoping she would include them in her new book. Lisa responded right away! 

We’re optimistic that this book (unlike several from the past) will make sure to include information about people of color who contributed/are contributing to Riot Grrrl culture and we’re looking forward to helping make this happen.

P.S. Sometimes we get really excited about Riot Grrrl and add extra R’s. Rrrrrrrr.