POC ZINE PROJECT

Posts tagged diy

COMMUNITY SUBMISSION: ‘Korea: The Queer Edition’

Korea: The Queer Edition (June 2013)

[DESCRIPTION: original cover of Korea: The Queer Edition]

TITLE: Korea: The Queer Edition 

AUTHOR: EstellaMiyuki Baker//Queer Scribe Productions

RELEASE: June 30, 2013 (6th zine in a series)

ORIGIN: Seoul, South Korea (author is presently based in Philadelphia, PA)

DESCRIPTION FROM MIYUKI: 

During my stay in Seoul, I participated in many ‘obvious’ gay activities but my goal was to meet as many different types of queer artists and activists inside and outside of the so-called Seoul gay scene, and highlight their varied and unique approaches and thoughts in doing LGBTQ activism in South Korea.  

Many queer Korean activists I spoke to were a part of labor rights and/or disability related movements, advocating strongly for intersectional work which emphasized ally-building and finding common causes. Larger LGBTQ organizations like Donginryun were member-supported, so rather than being subjeted to governmental or institutional demands that often accompany grant money, membership fees gave organizations more freedom and a democratic form of accountability.

The zine is filled with documentation of the many rallies and events I participated in as well as the art of queer Korean/expat artists.

READ NOW:  

HOW TO BUY:

Queer Scribe Productions has published eight zines so far. You can purchase them at the following link: https://www.etsy.com/shop/QueerScribe

Queer Scribe Productions is the result of Miyuki’s 14 month journey around the world to join the movement in creating a worldwide network of queer artists. 

ABOUT MIYUKI 

Miyuki is a resident of the place where circles overlap. As a queer, multi-racial/lingual female mixed-media artist, she is happiest when working with people who embrace intersectionality. After graduating from Swarthmore College in 2012, where she was involved in queer Asian activism and making art, she received the Watson Fellowship to travel the world in search of queer artists and activists and made 8 zines highlighting what she learned under her publishing house Queer Scribe Productions.

She is a freelance artist, journalist, barber, translator, seamstress, lecturer and performer. Visit The Queer Barbershop to get a rad haircut on the cheap. Contact her at heymiyuki (at) gmail (dot) com for further inquiries, project ideas and pricing.

estellamiyukibaker.com

heymiyuki.wordpress.com

twitter.com/miyukibaker

facebook.com/abcdefghijklmiyuki

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2014. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to ongoing advocacy costs, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

We are rebooted our org structure in 2014 and will be transparent about that process. Stay tuned.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

______________

Editor’s Note: Community Submission OR Call for Submissions post is usually from POC folk submitting their own zine or zine call to be featured by POCZP. If you would like to share your zine with the POC Zine Project community, here’s how to do it.

Please make sure to include pertinent info for CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: deadline, submission info/email/tumblr, related links, your own bio, etc.

As long as the zine was created/co-created by a person of color, we will always share Community Submissions. Enjoy!

POCZP also accepts anonymous submissions and zine donations from POC. Click here for submission guidelines.

Let’s Talk About: Nia King on her ‘punk privilege’

By Nia King, POCZP Contributor

There are a lot of things I hate about punk culture. You can read about most of them in The First 7-Inch Was Better: How I Became an Ex-Punk. But one of the positive things I took away from punk was the knowledge that I could do things myself (whether it was publishing a zine, putting a show together, or cooking a meal for a big crowd at Food Not Bombs with little help and little culinary training).

I’m not saying the zines, shows, or meals were exceptionally well-produced, but as a pink-haired 16 year old, I knew they were all things I could do myself. I didn’t need to ask permission. 

POCZP contributor Nia King (Summer 2013)

[DESCRIPTION: Nia King assembles some of her zines at home (2013). Photo credit: Nia King] 

As I got older, being a punk became less important to me, and identities like “queer” and “woman of color” began to play a bigger role in my life. I took my passion for social justice out of the VFW kitchen, and poured it into campus organizing in college, and after graduation, an entry level job at a terrible non-profit. There I learned that doing things well required years of training, lots of money, and often outside consultants. Little emphasis was put into helping us build the skills we’d need to do things ourselves. A lot of emphasis was put into making sure I didn’t forget to use oxford commas.

Three years outside of college (and one year outside the uber-dysfunctional non-profit), I am thankful for my punk roots. Though I dropped out of art school and still draw at, what I feel, is a high school level, I started a webcomic, which is currently being featured in the Lady Drawers exhibition in Chicago. With very little audio editing experience, I started a podcast. (I record all the interviews on my phone.) And without ever having taken a journalism class, I started writing for magazines. The verdict is still out on how that’s going.

None of the things I made are award-winning, all of them are a little rough around the edges. But I’ve overcome that deep-seated fear of imperfection that comes from the knowledge that as a queer woman of color I have to be a super-overachiever to be given even half the credit I’m due. I’m amplifying the voices of people from marginalized communities (whether it be myself or other queer and trans artists of color) in a way that I wouldn’t have been able to if I’d continue to believe I needed more training and better equipment before I put my foot in the water. Growing up in punk culture and zine culture taught me, “It doesn’t have to be perfect, you just have to do it.”

I’m sure my privileges as a light-skinned, middle-class, cisgender woman had everything to do with the doors that have been opened for me. Doors were also opened for me by the incredible mentors I had at Mills College and Colorlines Magazine (which is not where I developed my fear of forgetting oxford commas, and was actually an amazingly supportive work environment.)

But punk is where I learned the DIY ethic that taught me I don’t need a ton of schooling or a ton of money to call myself an artist. I just need to make art, self-publish, and hustle to get my work to the audience that matters most to me: other folks from marginalized communities struggling to figure out if they can do it themselves.

Nia King
artactivistnia.com
@artactivistnia

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WANT MORE?

Read: Let’s Keep Talking About Colo(ur)ism & Share Solutions

Read: Zines in the Classroom: Pros and Cons

Read: The Truth Tour and how to be an ally at POC and Native events

Read: Chaun Webster: ‘I make books… that’s my shit’

_____________________

“Let’s Talk About” is an experimental series by POCZP created to share communal knowledge, resources and reflections on a wide range of topics affecting communities of color.

If you are a person of color—or a white person with a history of supporting POC Zine Project— who wants to contribute to “Let’s Talk About,” submit to poczineproject@gmail.com with “Let’s Talk About” in the subject line. 

All submissions to “Let’s Talk About” will be compiled into a zine (print & digital) that will be released by POCZP in December of 2013.

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

ALERT: See POC Zine Project #RaceRiotTour member QUESE IMC, TONIGHT in Chicago! 

If you’re in the Chicago area, you have TWO opportunities TONIGHT (July 20, 2013) to see QUESE IMC in action. Here are the details:

1) The 11th Annual Sound System Block Party

Energy Alley Stage @ The Silver Room

1442 N. Milwaukee

Chicago, IL

QUESE goes on at 8:15pm

The Sound System Block Party is a day long celebration of Music, Art and Dance. They bring diverse art to a diverse community with 3 Stages and over 50 performances of Music and Visual Artists. What started off as a small gathering of friends has become Chicago’s best homegrown Block Party, 5,000 strong!

After the block party, go support this rad event featuring QUESE IMC at multikulti, where POCZP held a #RaceRiotTour event last year:

2) Quennect 4 Gallery presents: E.M.P.A.C.T. (Everyone’s Music Politics Activist Community Throwdown)

A fundraising event for GIRL TALK!

July 20, 2013 

9p – ?? (QUESE IMC will go on at about 11:15 pm)

Q4/Multkulti

1000 N. Milwaukee Ave., 4th floor, Chicago IL

Girl Talk is a volunteer supported program for girls, ages 12-17, who are detained in the Cook County Temporary Juvenile Detention Center (JTDC). A survey of the girls, conducted by CFJC, found that they faced serious concerns on a daily basis, including sexual assault and other forms of violence, relationship and conflict resolution, education and employment, legal rights, and a wide range of health issues.

Programming and services related to these issues were almost non-existent through the detention center. Girl talk provides the girls in the detention center a space to be free from the jail they find themselves in.

Chicago Girl Talk Collective is a group of women who run a program for the girls and young women temporarily incarcerated at the Cook County Juvenile Temporary Detention Center.

Project NIA is proud to be incubating the revived Girl Talk.  For more information about Project NIA, visit http://www.project-nia.org.

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QUESE IMC co-presented with POC Zine Project at the 2013 L.A. Zine Fest and is leading the indigenous solidarity strategy/coalition building for this year’s #RaceRiotTour. We will be sharing more details about this critical component of the tour in the coming weeks.

EDITOR’S NOTE [9/16/2013]: QUESE IMC is no longer the Indigenous Solidarity Coordinator for POCZP.

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

ZINE SPOTLIGHT: Mixed Up! A Zine about Mixed-Race Queer & Feminist Experience [READ & DOWNLOAD]

Mixed Up! A Zine about Mixed-Race Queer & Feminist Experience

POCZP helped support the call for submissions to Mixed Up! A zine about Mixed-Race Queer & Feminist Experience last fall. We’ll be distributing copies at Atlanta Zine Fest this weekend <3

AUTHORS: Zine editors Lil Lefkowitz, Lee Naught & Lior and contributors to “Mixed Up!”

TUMBLR: http://mrqfzine.tumblr.com/

PUBLISHED: April 24, 2013

NOTE FROM LIOR TO POCZP:

Thanks so much for your email, and for uploading Mixed Up to your Issuu.  We’d love it if you made the zine available in whatever way you feel like! So totally feel free to post the printable, so folx can make and distribute their own. And, of course, if you wanna make copies and sell them, by all means!

READ ‘MIXED UP!’ NOW

POCZP’s mission is to make zines by people of color easy to find, distribute and share. In that spirit, we’ve added a readable version online that you can also download, courtesy of the “Mixed Up!” editors.

ORIGINAL ‘MIXED UP!’ CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Hey, mixed-race folks, how do you respond when you get asked what you are? Do you feel at a loss for words when trying to describe your racial, ethnic, or cultural background? Do you find yourself struggling to understand where you belong in the context of prominent racial paradigms? Do you run into a POC-white binary that is reductive, incomplete, or simply not enough? What does it mean that there often isn’t an easy answer? And what happens when you add gender, feminism, and queerness into the mix?

Hey, queers and feminists, let’s respond to the lack of representation of mixed-race folks like us.  Yes, we are deeply indebted to the countless beautiful queers and feminists of color who have demanded to be heard; who fight, survive, and die on a daily basis. We are indebted to colonized people and feminists of color around the world and in the states who have taught us that black and brown are beautiful; who have shown us how to act with compassion and love and thoughtful rage in the face of white supremacist violence. This zine is a call to continue this work; to build upon the work of anti-racist and decolonial literature, given the nuances of our lives as mixed-race queers and feminists, so often living on stolen land while refusing to forget the land stolen from our ancestors.

No doubt, racism against folks of color is fucking real, and those of us who are mixed race and sometimes or always pass as white are much less prone to the multiple forms of violence faced by black and brown folks. However, too often, that’s the end of the conversation. This zine strives to challenge the narrow conception of POC vs white, a binary which doesn’t allow space for many folks’ experiences or for more complex identities (even among POCs and white folks).

As mixed-raced queers and feminists, we refuse to whitewash our histories. We refuse to label individuals based solely upon our perceptions of their skin color or features. Colonialism attempts to whitewash, erase, assimilate and subjugate through violence and oppression.  We refuse to finish this work. We invite you to collectively participate in this refusal.

A Working Definition of Mixed-race: While this may not be the perfect term, we are using it to frame a very broad set of experiences and identities, which may include tracing all or part of one’s culture or heritage to brown people and colonized people, inclusive of all skin tones. This may also include being raised with multiple cultures or with immigrant experience.

Why Queers & Feminists? Not only are we interested in the ways that mixed-race folks’ identities interact with queerness and feminism, but we also believe that it is important to prioritize stories from queers and feminists, whose voices are often marginalized. Moreover, with a topic as broad as race, we want to anchor our discussions in some common politics. This anchor is important because it is a big part of how we (the editors) choose who to organize with, live with, form community with, fuck, and, in this case, write zines with.

Possible Topics: Privilege. [Not] Passing. Sex, relationships & dating. Conflicting and conflated identities (especially related to race and queerness, transness, feminism, class, dis/ability). The POC/white binary. Cultural appropriation. Structural and institutional oppression. Art, music & creativity. [Not] Belonging. Cultural estrangement. Immigrant experiences. Families & histories. Colonizing processes in family, work, activisms & relationships. Being too brown/not brown enough. Home. Diaspora. Performing identities. Physical manifestations of race, and intersection with other forms of identity and presentation. Preserving and paying respect to heritage & history (eg: interviews, oral histories, folklore). RememberingTracing origins and roots. The importance of race/ethnicity/culture to political formation. Mixed-race community. Food & recipes. Remedies. Developing new language(s). Race/religion overlap (and exclusion). And much, much more.

Media and formats: Poetry, prose, essay, visuals (B&W for zine, possibly color online), audio (for online), interviews, and other formats (pitch them to us!— we’re good catchers).

Deadline for submissions: Extended to January 15th, 2012.  Submit to mrqfzine [at] gmail [dot] com.

Contact:
mrqfzine [at] gmail [dot] com
www.mrqfzine.tumblr.com

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HELP DISTRIBUTE ‘MIXED! UP’ ZINE

Download a read-only and a PRINT version here, courtesy of the ‘Mixed Up!’ zine editors.

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

POCZP&#8217;S MULTIMEDIA PANEL DETAILS
Date: 2/17/13
Time: 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Topic: POC Zine Project presents: Beyond ‘Race Riot’: People of Color in Zines from 1990s-Today
Hashtag: #POCZINES &lt;&#8212; Find this on Twitter on 2/17 to get live-tweets from the event &amp; use the tag to share quotes, your observations and to ask us questions!
Venue: The Moth Theatre, 4359 Melrose Ave  Los Angeles, CA 90029
In recent years, punk and riot grrrl have become the subject of much retrospection and analysis (there are easily a score of scholarly and popular monographs, documentaries, and exhibitions completed or in progress). This retrospective turn, with its subsequent institutionalization of some stories about punk and riot grrrl and not others, has largely failed to center race as a crucial factor, or to observe punks of color as a vital but also a discomforting presence.
POC Zine Project interrupts this void.
Join POC Zine Project members Cristy C. Road, Osa Atoe, Mariam Bastani, Suzy X, Tomas Moniz and POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano as they reunite after the 2012 Race Riot! Tour at L.A. Zine Fest. POCZP members will present a multimedia reading and discussion, as well as answer questions about their experience traveling to 14 cities and six universities on the Race Riot! tour, strategies for building community, and more.
There will be time after the panel to purchase merch from POCZP in the Moth Theatre.
POCZP&#8217;S TABLING DETAILS
The tabling portion of the Fest will be held in the Ukrainian Cultural Center from 11:00 AM until 5:00 PM PST. 
POC Zine Project&#8217;s table is listed as #64 in the event materials. You can find us near the front entrance, across from the snack table. Yay, proximity to snacks! 
Address: Ukrainian Cultural Center, 4315 Melrose Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90029
Entrance: The main entrance to the Cultural Center is located on Melrose Ave., across the street from HRLDRY. This entrance, as well as the loading entrance on Heliotrope, are wheelchair accessible.
SOME OF THE #POCZINES YOU&#8217;LL FIND AT THE &#8220;RACE RIOT MALL&#8221;
Our zine partners for this tabling session are SlushPilePress, For The Birds and Maximumrocknroll.

Race Riot #1

So You Want To Start A Feminist Collective

Working On It: People of Color Experience Occupy Wall Street
An Interview With Ashanti Alston

Maximumrocknroll - various back issues with POC features and covers

Workin&#8217; On It! Women of Color Occupy Wall Street &amp; Beyond #2

Our Culture, Our Resistance #1
Our Culture, Our Resistance #2

Workin&#8217; on It: Ways to Tokenize/Alienate a Non-White Person
EVENT DETAILSL.A. Zine Fest is celebrating its second year by bringing a block party to Heliotrope and Melrose on February 17, 2013 from 11 am - 5&#160;pm at The Ukrainian Cultural Center. FREE!  The Cultural Center will be bursting with 100+ exhibitors from across the city, state, and country who are here to share their zines, comics and DIY publications with you! Across the street at gallery/record store HRLDRY is our Zine Library, where you can browse zines from current and past exhibitors. Around the corner, The Moth Theatre will host our workshops and panels. This year&#8217;s workshops and panels include:  + A multimedia reading and discussion featuring POC Zine Project&#8217;s Cristy C. Road, Osa Atoe, Mariam Bastani, Suzy X, Daniela Capristrano &amp; Tomas Moniz &#8212;their first reunion since their 14-city Race Riot Tour 2012! Get a first-hand, informed primer on people of color in zines from the 90s up to now from some experienced zinesters.  +Zineworks Collective&#8217;s speed-dating-style zinester meet-up! In this interactive workshop, get to know possible future collaborators, swap stories and tips, plus leave with a free zine from Zineworks!  + Mend My Dress Press&#8217; workshop offering up some strategies to help you begin the process of anthologizing your zine, touching on everything from choosing content to suggestions for publishing. Get advice from the Press&#8217; founders and authors in the flesh!  + a panel discussion with Allison Wolfe (of Bratmobile/Cool Moms), Alice Bag (punk musician and author of Violence Girl), and Drew Denny (musician/filmmaker), moderated by K. Bradford. Following the last talk, there will be a FREE afterparty hosted by Sean Carnage with live music TBA in the Ukrainian Cultural Center! ALL events, panels, and the Zine Fest itself are free, all-ages, and open to the public!  L.A. Zine Fest at The Ukrainian Cultural Center 4315 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90029 11 am - 5&#160;pm Afterparty to follow Extra bike parking in front of Orange 20 from 12pm - 6pm! Read Q&amp;A&#8217;s and check out the full list of exhibitors at http://lazinefest.com/! 
Click here to confirm you&#8217;re &#8220;going&#8221; or a &#8220;maybe&#8221; on the L.A. Zine Fest event page on Facebook.
COMMUNITY: If you attend this event, PLEASE come by our table and/or to our panel and say hi! We are looking for more folks to involve in upcoming POCZP initiatives and events &lt;3
Give us a heads up that you&#8217;ll be looking for us by sending us a note here or to poczineproject@gmail.com.

POCZP’S MULTIMEDIA PANEL DETAILS

Date: 2/17/13

Time: 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Topic: POC Zine Project presents: Beyond ‘Race Riot’: People of Color in Zines from 1990s-Today

Hashtag: #POCZINES <— Find this on Twitter on 2/17 to get live-tweets from the event & use the tag to share quotes, your observations and to ask us questions!

Venue: The Moth Theatre, 4359 Melrose Ave  Los Angeles, CA 90029

In recent years, punk and riot grrrl have become the subject of much retrospection and analysis (there are easily a score of scholarly and popular monographs, documentaries, and exhibitions completed or in progress). This retrospective turn, with its subsequent institutionalization of some stories about punk and riot grrrl and not others, has largely failed to center race as a crucial factor, or to observe punks of color as a vital but also a discomforting presence.

POC Zine Project interrupts this void.

Join POC Zine Project members Cristy C. Road, Osa Atoe, Mariam Bastani, Suzy X, Tomas Moniz and POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano as they reunite after the 2012 Race Riot! Tour at L.A. Zine Fest. POCZP members will present a multimedia reading and discussion, as well as answer questions about their experience traveling to 14 cities and six universities on the Race Riot! tour, strategies for building community, and more.

There will be time after the panel to purchase merch from POCZP in the Moth Theatre.

POCZP’S TABLING DETAILS

The tabling portion of the Fest will be held in the Ukrainian Cultural Center from 11:00 AM until 5:00 PM PST. 

POC Zine Project’s table is listed as #64 in the event materials. You can find us near the front entrance, across from the snack table. Yay, proximity to snacks! 

Address: Ukrainian Cultural Center, 4315 Melrose Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90029

Entrance: The main entrance to the Cultural Center is located on Melrose Ave., across the street from HRLDRY. This entrance, as well as the loading entrance on Heliotrope, are wheelchair accessible.

SOME OF THE #POCZINES YOU’LL FIND AT THE “RACE RIOT MALL”

Our zine partners for this tabling session are SlushPilePress, For The Birds and Maximumrocknroll.
Race Riot #1
So You Want To Start A Feminist Collective
Working On It: People of Color Experience Occupy Wall Street

An Interview With Ashanti Alston
Maximumrocknroll - various back issues with POC features and covers
Workin’ On It! Women of Color Occupy Wall Street & Beyond #2
Our Culture, Our Resistance #1
Our Culture, Our Resistance #2
Workin’ on It: Ways to Tokenize/Alienate a Non-White Person

EVENT DETAILS
L.A. Zine Fest is celebrating its second year by bringing a block party to Heliotrope and Melrose on February 17, 2013 from 11 am - 5 pm at The Ukrainian Cultural Center. FREE! 

The Cultural Center will be bursting with 100+ exhibitors from across the city, state, and country who are here to share their zines, comics and DIY publications with you! Across the street at gallery/record store HRLDRY is our Zine Library, where you can browse zines from current and past exhibitors. Around the corner, The Moth Theatre will host our workshops and panels. This year’s workshops and panels include:

+ A multimedia reading and discussion featuring POC Zine Project’s Cristy C. Road, Osa Atoe, Mariam Bastani, Suzy X, Daniela Capristrano & Tomas Moniz —their first reunion since their 14-city Race Riot Tour 2012! Get a first-hand, informed primer on people of color in zines from the 90s up to now from some experienced zinesters.

+Zineworks Collective’s speed-dating-style zinester meet-up! In this interactive workshop, get to know possible future collaborators, swap stories and tips, plus leave with a free zine from Zineworks!

+ Mend My Dress Press’ workshop offering up some strategies to help you begin the process of anthologizing your zine, touching on everything from choosing content to suggestions for publishing. Get advice from the Press’ founders and authors in the flesh!

+ a panel discussion with Allison Wolfe (of Bratmobile/Cool Moms), Alice Bag (punk musician and author of Violence Girl), and Drew Denny (musician/filmmaker), moderated by K. Bradford.

Following the last talk, there will be a FREE afterparty hosted by Sean Carnage with live music TBA in the Ukrainian Cultural Center! ALL events, panels, and the Zine Fest itself are free, all-ages, and open to the public!

L.A. Zine Fest
at The Ukrainian Cultural Center
4315 Melrose Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90029
11 am - 5 pm

Afterparty to follow
Extra bike parking in front of Orange 20 from 12pm - 6pm!

Read Q&A’s and check out the full list of exhibitors at http://lazinefest.com/

Click here to confirm you’re “going” or a “maybe” on the L.A. Zine Fest event page on Facebook.

COMMUNITY: If you attend this event, PLEASE come by our table and/or to our panel and say hi! We are looking for more folks to involve in upcoming POCZP initiatives and events <3

Give us a heads up that you’ll be looking for us by sending us a note here or to poczineproject@gmail.com.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: Brown Queen: Latina Voices of the 21st Century

image

TITLE: Muchacha

CREATOR: Daisy Salinas

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: March 1, 2013

Muchacha: A quarterly fanzine that seeks to promote the “F” word feminism, encourage involvement in the DIY music/art community & inspire participation in grassroots activism.

DETAILS FROM DAISY

The theme for the upcoming issue #5 (Spring, 13’) of my fanzine Muchacha is “Brown Queen: Latina Voices of the 21st Century”. I am calling out to Latina/Chicana/Hispanic identified women worldwide to contribute their voices though an array of mediums including poetry, essays, art, comics, etc. I want this issue to serve as a time capsule for future generations of Brown women. Let our voices be heard and let us pick up the pieces and continue the lessons of our foremothers. As Gloria Anzaldúa brilliantly said: “I will no longer be made to feel ashamed of existing. I will have my voice: Indian, Spanish, white. I will have my serpent’s tongue - my woman’s voice, my sexual voice, my poet’s voice. I will overcome the tradition of silence.”

Join me in overcoming the traditions of silence. To submit your contributions contact me at Riotgrrrl56@yahoo.com with “Brown Queen” as the subject. Deadline for submissions is March 1st, 2013.

La tema de mi próxima edición #5 (Primavera, 13’) di me revistilla Muchacha es “Brown Queen: Latina Voices of the 21st Century” (Reina Morena: Voces Latinas Del Siglo 21). Estoy llamando a las mujeres identificadas como Latina/Chicana/Hispana por todo el mundo para contribuir sus voces a través de una variedad de medios incluyendo poesía, ensayos, arte, cómicos, etc. Quiero que esta edición sirva como una cápsula del tiempo para las futuras generaciones de mujeres Latinas. Deje que nuestras voces se escuchen, y deje que nosotros recogemos los pedazos y seguir las lecciones de nuestras antepasadas. Como Gloria Anzaldúa brillantemente dijo: “Ya no mi haré sentir vergüenza por existir. Tendré mi voz: India, Español, blanca. Tendré mi lengua de serpiente - la voz de mi mujer, mi voz sexual, la voz de mi poeta. Voy a superar la tradición del silencio.”

Acompáñeme en el vencimiento de las tradiciones de silencio. Para enviar sus contribuciones póngase en contacto conmigo Riotgrrrl56@yahoo.com con “Reina Morena” en el título. Fecha límite para submisions es Marzo 1st, 2013.

muchachafanzine.tumblr.com

wemakezines.ning.com/profile/DaisySalinas

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Editor’s Note: A “Community Submission” post results from POC folk submitting their own zine to be featured on the POC Zine Project Tumblr. If you would like to share your zine with the POC Zine Project community, here’s how to do it.

When you submit, feel free to add some background, a description of your work and art and your mission statement. If you just send us the name of your zine, we’ll simply link back to a source for purchasing it and use the language you already have on your site.

As long as the zine was created/co-created by a person of color, we will always share Community Submissions. Enjoy!

POCZP accepts anonymous submissions and zine donations from POC. Click here for submission guidelines.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: Our 3-year anniversary is January 20 + we need your help!

POC Zine Project: 3-year anniversary is Jan 20, 2012

Community,

On January 20, 2010, I created the @poczineproject Twitter account and organized a couple of events. That was the start of an experiment in activism and community through materiality that grew into last year’s 14-city Race Riot! tour and the developing Legacy Series.

POCZP is still a 100% DIY, volunteer operation. We are finally at a stage where we can begin collaborating with interns. We are evaluating funding models aligned with our core values and discussing what sustainability for the project will look like after 2013. 

It’s pretty incredible how quickly time can fly when you’re pouring your heart and soul into something you believe in. It doesn’t feel like three years — more like the blink of an eye. And there’s still so much more to be done.

So here’s what we’re asking:

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: BE INCLUDED IN OUR 2012 RACE RIOT! TOUR ZINE

We want to hear from you! Tell us what you think about the POC Zine Project (Submit here or to daniela@dcapmedia.com).

What about the project speaks to you?

What would you like to see us do in the future? 

If you attended one of our events, describe your experience.

If any of the touring members inspire you in some way, share your experience.

These are just some topics you can write about, but we want to leave it open. 

DEADLINE: February 28, 2013

MORE WAYS TO HELP

1) Support the 2013 Race Riot! tour by contacting us here (or at daniela@dcapmedia.com) and let us know if you’re interested in helping us organize a tour date in your town. We will be traveling through the Southwest (starting in Atlanta) and up the West Coast (ending in Seattle). Final dates TBA soon.

2) Be an intern and/or volunteer. We can offer school credit and accept applications from people who aren’t presently in school. Telecommuting options are available.

3) Make a donation and support our efforts. All funds go toward upcoming event costs and our original zine series. DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

Thank you, to all of you who have messaged us in different ways over the years with your zine submissions, questions and offers of support.

A huge thank you to those who have donated their time and resources in both digital and physical realms. You know who you are.

Love and Solidarity,

Daniela

Founder, POC Zine Project

COMMUNITY SUBMISSION: 1001 Black Men — Black Nerds, Afro-Geeks, and Dungeon Masters with Soul

TITLE: 1001 Black Men

CREATOR: Ajuan Mance

RELEASE: 2012

ORIGIN: Oakland, CA (USA)

DESCRIPTION BY AJUAN: 1001 Black Men is a zine that publishes selections from the 1001 Black Men online sketchbook by the artist Ajuan Mance (me), organized by subject. Here’s an excerpt from the artist’s statement, describing the goals of the 1001 Black Men project:

1001 Black Men is a series of drawings inspired by the faces I see in Oakland every day, and by my memories of the family, friends, and neighbors I grew up with out east.  In the poem “Beautiful Black Men,” Nikki Giovanni describes her love for all types of Black men, explaining that, for her, they represent “the same old danger/but a brand new pleasure.” In this series of drawings, I push past entrenched stereotypes to create images of Black men that reflect the wonderful complexity of African American lives—our history so deeply embedded in our present, our celebrations so often tempered by grief and, yes, the pleasure and danger we find in so many of the people, places, and activities that give us joy.

This 8.5” x 11” zine includes both color and grayscale images.

Where to Buy: The zine is available on Etsy.com at the 8-Rock Press Store.

Say Hello: eightrock@ymail.com

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Editor’s Note: A “Community Submission” post results from POC folk submitting their own zine to be featured on the POC Zine Project Tumblr. If you would like to share your zine with the POC Zine Project community, here’s how to do it.


When you submit, feel free to add some background, a description of your work and art and your mission statement. If you just send us the name of your zine, we’ll simply link back to a source for purchasing it and use the language you already have on your site.


As long as the zine was created/co-created by a person of color, we will always share Community Submissions. Enjoy!

COMMUNITY SUBMISSION: The Itinerant Postcard #2

The Itinerant Postcard 2

POC zine: The Itinerant Postcard #2

Date: October 2012

POC zinester: Chrysothème A.

Zinester’s description: “The Itinerant Postcard #2” is a 24-page 1/4-sized perzine containing some of my thoughts on language, food, and race; there are Filipino recipes, some Philippine mythology, and illustrations by Edward Gorey.

Keywords: edwardgorey, filipina, filipino, food, mythology, personal, perzine, perzines, pinay, pinoy, race, zine, zines

$1 or trades welcome.

Buy this zine: on Etsy.

You can also send well-concealed cash payment to a snail mail address:

Chrysothème A.

5011 Rolling Meadows

Road Rolling Hills Estates, CA 90274 USA

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Editor’s Note: A “Community Submission” post results from POC folk submitting their own zine to be featured on the POC Zine Project Tumblr. If you would like to share your zine with the POC Zine Project community, here’s how to do it.

When you submit, feel free to add some background, a description of your work and art and your mission statement. If you just send us the name of your zine, we’ll simply link back to a source for purchasing it and use the language you already have on your site.

As long as the zine was created/co-created by a person of color, we will always share Community Submissions. Enjoy!