POC ZINE PROJECT

Posts tagged feminisms

COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT: Meet POCZP’s 2013 #RACERIOTTOUR Driver Tracey Brown <3

Community,

We shared the mistakes we made during last year’s #raceriottour (view prezi) so that we would set a new standard for this year’s tour. In response to feedback, POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano prioritized Native/Indigenous Solidarity, self-care and caregiving for this year’s tour planning process.

Mainstream artists tour with their own wellness teams. People who plan corporate-sponsored tours understand the importance of having such a team in place. Tracey Brown is one of several #RaceRiotTour support team members we’ll be announcing in the coming days …

POCZP'S 2013 #RACERIOTTOUR DRIVER TRACEY BROWN 1 of 2

[DESCRIPTION: Tracey Brown. Photo credit: Tracey Brown]

ABOUT TRACEY BROWN, 2013 #RACERIOTTOUR DRIVER & MEDIATION SUPPORT

Tracey’s role on the #raceriottour is critical. In partnership with POCZP founder Daniela, Tracey is managing travel logistics/vehicle operations through our journey to 20 cities across the US. She will be the dedicated tour driver for the duration of the entire tour (with routine breaks from the POCZP support team).

Tracey will also provide (along with others on tour) mediation support as conflicts arise (they do! and it’s OK). 

POCZP founder Daniela met Tracey at the 2012 Anarchist People of Color convergence in New Orleans and was impressed with her organizational skills and her coalition building with the Ovarian Psyco-Cycles. This is the origin of the collaboration.

Without Tracey’s support coordinating rental logistics, this tour would not be happening.

Tracey, in her own words:

Born and raised in New Orleans, LA, Tracey is a community organizer
and survivor. With her love for the New Orleans POC community guiding her, she graduated from University of Hawaii at Manoa in 2009 with a dual degree in Psychology and American Studies.

Upon returning to her hometown, she became involved in various social justice endeavors such as bike accessibility, food justice, anti-racism work, housing justice, and anything else she could get involved in and help create accountability to and visibility of the local POC community. Among these undertakings was the collective organization of the 2012 Anarchist People of Color convergence in New Orleans.

Tracey currently works at the New Orleans Food Co-op while she
prepares to apply to graduate school in order to obtain her Master’s
degree in Community and Clinical Psychology. She also works with NOLA to Angola, an anti-PIC organization that provides a long-distance, solidarity bike ride to raise funds for the Cornerstone Builders’ Bus Project, the only bus service that provides free monthly rides to low-income families who have loved ones in one of the five Louisiana detention facilities. 

Tracey intends to use her experience organizing with various groups and her time with POCZP to create accountable, accessible, multidimensional community building, and POC driven community mental and spiritual health healing.

We’re so excited to collaborate with you, Tracey! <3 - POCZP

POCZP'S 2013 #RACERIOTTOUR DRIVER TRACEY BROWN 2 of 2

[DESCRIPTION: Tracey Brown. Photo credit: Tracey Brown]

——————-

We will be sharing the full #raceriottour lineup of cities and dates on September 1, 2013, and will be rolling out more tour member announcements in the coming days.

Thanks for your patience! We are a 100% volunteer entity and are producing a national tour in our spare time.

——————-

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goals for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

Hey POC Zine Project! We at the Feminist Press love your organization’s blog, and we were hoping you would check ours out. We’re an independent nonprofit dedicated to publishing literature that promotes feminism, activism, and social justice. We’ll be posting book reviews, the latest in gender and sexuality issues, and other exciting news on our Tumblr. Perhaps you could help support us and spread the word to your followers, maybe join in on our discussions? We’d appreciate it! — Asked by thefeministpress

Dear Feminist Press and other entities that are reaching out to us right now solely to help them with things:

Thanks for your message. We appreciate your kind words. As you may have noticed from following our Tumblr (and through info we have shared here), we are in the middle of booking a 20 city tour. We are a 100% DIY, volunteer, unfunded project. As you can imagine, a 20 city tour is a tall order to deliver on when you factor in regular life needs (day job, family, etc.). We need all the help we can get.

With that context, we offer you the following friendly advice/guidance:

1. If it’s your first time reaching out to us, please consider figuring out in advance what sort of support you can offer in return, before asking us to take on additional tasks to further your mission. 

2. We are not a promotional mechanism for publishers. We are a grassroots advocacy platform for POC and deeply consider everything we help signal boost (intention, history of person/org, etc.). If you would like to develop a content sharing partnership, then you must also share what you can provide us in return.

3. If we have never seen you promote our efforts on your digital platforms, why should we consider adding additional tasks in the middle of booking our tour to support you? For example, Feminist Press has not re-blogged or promoted anything from POCZP on their Tumblr for over a week now (that’s as far back as we went to check), but yet contacted us on Tumblr asking for promotion … on our Tumblr. Does that make sense in terms of building goodwill/coalition building? No, it does not.

4. Please consider your various privileges before assuming that we have the space, time and emotional bandwidth to help you with your promotional efforts - especially without offering any support in return.

If you’d like to continue to discuss this (and have considered ways to offer us support so this is a mutually beneficial arrangement), please email poczineproject@gmail.com.

<3

POCZP

ZINESTER SPOTLIGHT: Celina Williams, Zinester & Librarian in Virginia

Some of Celina Williams' zines: POC zinester and librarian in Richmond, VA

[DESCRIPTION: Some of Celina Williams’ own zines. Photo credit: Celina]

By Cata, POCZP East Coast Intern/Coordinator

Celina Williams is a zinester, a librarian of special collections and a Richmond Zine Fest organizer for 5+ years. You can visit Celina and a zine collection within the James Branch Cabell Library in Richmond, VA.

Check out Richmond Zine Fest, happening this year on October 5th! Find out more at richmondzinefest.org. Richmond Zine Fest has been going strong in Richmond, VA, since 2007.

From Celina:

Richmond Zine Fest registration for workshops and tablers is open… if you know of any folks who’d be available/interested to participate Saturday Oct. 5th, I’d be happy to answer any questions.

POCZP’S Q&A WITH CELINA

POCZP: How long have you been making zines?

CELINA: Consciously, for the past 6+ years. When I was a kid I would play around with the stapler and make little books—those are zines right!?

POCZP: Nice! What kind of zines do you make currently?

CELINA: I make poetry and photo zines. My latest issue is Mean Girls and it’s about being told I look mean because I don’t smile. So it got me thinking about the mean/nice binary. Also, being a black and Hispanic woman, I am used to people commenting about my demeanor and look, they often say “what are you?”

POCZP: Any ideas for future zines?

CELINA: Actually, yes!! A friend and I were walking and noticing how trees often have these beautiful designs that often look look like vaginas, so a collaboration zine soon to be made will be called In the Tree’s Vagina.

POCZP: Awesome. Man, I can think of a lot of trees that would be perfect for your zine haha! Switching gears a bit, why do you think making zines is important?

CELINA: Well, I am a librarian and I view zines as creating a kind of archive for yourself. I see zines like that. But it’s an archive that you share. For example my mom bought me a diary when I was younger; but it felt weird to write and not share.

POCZP: Wow!! I love that because it makes me think of one of my favorite quotes “an untold story is the greatest burden” by Alice Walker.

CELINA: Right! And self-publication in zines is cool because in academia there is this rigid way you have to be—and that just doesn’t exist in zines.

POCZP: Any other things your working on?

CELINA: Yes! I am reorganizing the zine collection at our library (yes we have a zine collection!) and after this interview I will be finding out a way to tag and measure POC representation in our collection.

POCZP: That’s awesome! Let POC Zine Project know if you need any support! Any last exciting things happening in your community?

CELINA: Thank-you! and yes…Shout out to Richmond Zine Fest Co-organizers!! Which I’ve been a part of for the past 5+ years. Also, it was just international zine month so don’t forget to check out new zines!!

POCZP: Thank you!

</end>

CONTACT CELINA

celinanicoledoes.tumblr.com

Twitter.com/celinanicole

_____________________

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

"Daniela Capistrano, founder of the POC Zine Project, contacted me in 2010 about digitizing and distributing for free the Race Riot compilation zines, which I made in 1997 and 2002. Her goals are numerous, but among them is to support and distribute independent publications by people of color, and to reclaim histories of people of color in publishing cultures, from FIRE! to Race Riot and more. I hadn’t thought about these zines for a while until Osa Atoe from Shotgun Seamstress (a zine for Black punks, feminists, queers, misfits, and freaks) wrote a Maximum Rocknroll column the year previous asking, “Where did all the black and brown punk foremothers go?” and naming me and some others specifically as missing persons. This resonated with me, since I was motivated at the time by a passionate desire to claim the fact of history –that we were here, black and brown punks, feminists, queers, misfits, and freaks—and acknowledge those who came before us and laid the foundations for our becoming punk, and those who were with us when we went through this (or that) moment together, and those who came after us who wonder where we are now.

So when I was scheduled in November 2011 to present an academic paper at the University of Pennsylvania, I contacted Jenna Freedman at the Barnard Zine Library (Jenna has focused that zine collection on women of color zines specifically) about doing an event there, at Barnard. In short order, she organized the first “Meet Me at the Race Riot” panel with Kate Wadkins of For the Birds Feminist Collective and Distro and Daniela of POC Zine Project. We had an in-depth dialogue with seventy-something people in this small windowless room, and Daniela thought, We should take this show on the road. The first POC Zine Project/Race Riot! Tour happened in September and October 2012 – 5 and sometimes 6 women of color in a van, hitting 14 cities and 20 events in 2 weeks. Every night –and sometimes twice in one day— we would read from our zines and facilitate these often super-intense conversations about structures of race and racism, punk activism, feminist art, anarchist politics, consent and accountability, violence, family histories and queer becoming. It was exhausting, but also exhilarating, to be a part of these conversations and to be able to facilitate and funnel some of what I know and do as a feminist scholar trained in comparative race studies and transnational cultural studies into these spaces – not just college classrooms, but also cafes, art collectives, living rooms, punk venues, independent bookstores, and more. One of the more significant consequences to growing up punk, for me, is an understanding that politics can and should be found and unfolded anywhere – and that one does not need to be an expert to be curious, outraged, or outspoken about the conditions that structure our everyday lives.

Until now, my punk history hasn’t been the subject of my scholarship, which is in the main concerned with liberal war, and liberal empire. But recent flurries of academic and popular inquiry into punk and riot grrrl have pulled me into their orbit. I’m somewhat conflicted about becoming an object of study, but I am coping by co-organizing an upcoming symposium with my amazing colleagues Ruth Nicole Brown, Karen Flynn, and Fiona I.B. Ngô, called “Hip Hop and Punk Feminisms: Theory, Genealogy, Performance.”

- Excerpt from POCZP touring member Mimi Thi Nguyen's interview with The Feminist Wire!

Thanks for the shout out, Mimi! <3

Learn more about the upcoming symposium “Hip Hop and Punk Feminisms: Theory, Genealogy, Performance.”

If you haven’t already, be sure to read Race Riot #1 & #2 <3

_____________________

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

POC Zine Project wants to see YOUR #POCZINES Collection

What does your ‪#‎poczines‬ collection look like? Send us a photo of your shelf/drawer/area under your pillow/etc. & we’ll feature it in our ‪#‎izm2013‬ reactions post first week of August.

If you only have two zines created by POC, it’s still a collection - even if you made both of them!  

Deadline: August 28, 2013

PLEASE EMAIL: poczineproject@gmail.com (we are only accepting submissions through email, thanks!)

Please be sure to include the following:

- 1-3 max photos of your #poczines collection (please make sure they are as clear as possible) with photo credit info (the higher resolution the better, thanks!)

- your bio

- any links/contact info you want to share

- info about your own zines that YOU make (optional)

- any of your upcoming/current projects that need some signal boost love. We gotchu boo. 

We know many folks collect zines by authors of diverse backgrounds, so it’s 100% OK/common if you have a mix of POC and non-POC authored zines in your collection. However, for the purposes of this visibility exercise, we only want to see the zines made by POC in your collection (co-authored with non-POC is fine, as long as editor was/is POC).

WHITE FOLKS: Send photos & info about your #poczines collection as well! We wants to see the #poczines on your shelves too.

Please be sure to also include what POC solidarity looks like in your life, both in theory and in practice. 

<3,

POCZP

ZINE SPOTLIGHT: BROS FALL BACK (2013)
RELEASE: May 2013
ORIGIN: Philly, PA
AUTHOR: &#8220;The Secret Society of Femmes&#8221;
HOW TO BUY/ACCESS: Contact antieverythingshows@gmail.com directly for instructions on how to get a copy of the print version.
READ BROS FALL BACK NOW!
This is the print view version (only one available online) so it&#8217;s best viewed in full-screen mode.

POC ZINE PROJECT REVIEWS BROS FALL BACK
By Suzy X, POCZP touring member
Hi zinesters! Last month I had the pleasure of reading at Ladyfest Philly, where I read/performed from my middle school diaries. I was in great company, and many laughs (and tears) were shared.
But being the only author of color at the reading left me a little confused; there are actually plenty of POC doing radical, D.I.Y work in Philadelphia alone, and not enough of them were at this event! Hopefully next year&#8217;s zine reading can be a better reflection of that.So on that note, a new zine that I&#8217;m absolutely enamored with is BROS FALL BACK, a zine recently written by some QPOC based in Philly known as &#8220;The Secret Society of Femmes.&#8221;
Rather than resorting to the classic declaration of &#8220;girls to the front!&#8221; BROS FALL BACK takes a more intersectional approach to combating hetero-patriarchy in D.I.Y. and punk spaces. This shift in focus allows more room for those who are not &#8220;girls&#8221; nor &#8220;bros,&#8221; but are still fair game under white male supremacy.
The zine also delves into the racist and capitalist dynamics within punk culture, illustrating the slippery slope that starts with a new DIY space and ends with gentrification.
——————-
[IMAGE DESCRIPTION: Suzy X holds her copy of BROS FALL BACK. Photo credit: Suzy X]
——————-
SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT
If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.
DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

ZINE SPOTLIGHT: BROS FALL BACK (2013)

RELEASE: May 2013

ORIGIN: Philly, PA

AUTHOR: “The Secret Society of Femmes”

HOW TO BUY/ACCESS: Contact antieverythingshows@gmail.com directly for instructions on how to get a copy of the print version.

READ BROS FALL BACK NOW!

This is the print view version (only one available online) so it’s best viewed in full-screen mode.

POC ZINE PROJECT REVIEWS BROS FALL BACK

By Suzy X, POCZP touring member

Hi zinesters! Last month I had the pleasure of reading at Ladyfest Philly, where I read/performed from my middle school diaries. I was in great company, and many laughs (and tears) were shared.

But being the only author of color at the reading left me a little confused; there are actually plenty of POC doing radical, D.I.Y work in Philadelphia alone, and not enough of them were at this event! Hopefully next year’s zine reading can be a better reflection of that.

So on that note, a new zine that I’m absolutely enamored with is BROS FALL BACK, a zine recently written by some QPOC based in Philly known as “The Secret Society of Femmes.”

Rather than resorting to the classic declaration of “girls to the front!” BROS FALL BACK takes a more intersectional approach to combating hetero-patriarchy in D.I.Y. and punk spaces. This shift in focus allows more room for those who are not “girls” nor “bros,” but are still fair game under white male supremacy.

The zine also delves into the racist and capitalist dynamics within punk culture, illustrating the slippery slope that starts with a new DIY space and ends with gentrification.

——————-

[IMAGE DESCRIPTION: Suzy X holds her copy of BROS FALL BACK. Photo credit: Suzy X]

——————-

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT: #CAHungerStrike #PelicanBay Awareness

POCZP Donor and Resistance Behind Bars author Victoria Law (who also edits Tenacious zine) will be on the ”Melissa Harris-Perry" show this Saturday, July 13 (show starts at 10am ET), to talk about what is happening at #PelicanBay and other prisons in California. Vikki will be discussing her recent article about the Pelican Bay hunger strikes and the families organizing in support of their demands.

Follow #nerdland on Twitter to view the related conversation during the show.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT #CAHungerStrike

Right now 30,000 prisoners in California are on hunger strike. According to Amnesty International, that is the largest hunger strike in the state’s history, encompassing roughly two-thirds of the state’s inmates.

For additional context on why the strike is happening, check out some of the shocking facts in the infographic below on the conditions of indefinite isolation in California, where more than 3,000 prisoners are held in these high security isolation units known as Security Housing Units (SHUS).

Additionally, The Sacramento Bee reports that the Center for Investigative Reporting found that the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation sterilized nearly 150 female inmates from 2006 to 2010 without required state approvals.

[DESCRIPTION: This single page infographic by Amnesty International is best viewed in full screen mode to zoom in on sections]

Follow #CAHungerStrike on Twitter to stay informed. 

MORE INFO FROM HOMIES UNIDOS

The California Prisoner’s Hunger Strike started once again on July 8, 2013. The protesters have said that they will not stop until demands are addressed even if that means giving their lives.

Sign the petition: The Petition

Statewide Rally at Corcoran State Prison

Saturday, July 13, 3:00 PM

Bus and carpool leaves from Los Angeles at 8:30 AM, 

From: Chuco’s Justice Center,1137 E. Redondo, Inglewood

THE FIVE DEMANDS 

The inhumane conditions inside CA dungeons, particularly in isolation - a form of torture -, brought prisoners together across racial, geographic, and political lines. They united to end hostilities and fight for changes in SHU conditions. These men have suffered injustice and torture for decades. Governors, wardens, courts, and media have disregarded all previous attempts to change conditions. As a result, the hunger-strikers have placed their lives on the line and developed five core demands: Link for Flier

  • End Group Punishment & Administrative Abuse: Hold people accountable for their individualactions,rather than punishing everyone. Collective punishment is a fascist practice!
  • Abolish the Debriefing Policy, and Modify Active/Inactive Gang Status Criteria: The ‘debriefing’ policy is known as “snitch or die” - since the only way out of the SHU is to debrief (inform on another prisoner). In some cases, people have been in the SHUs since the ’60s or ’70s for political beliefs or jailhouse lawyering. 
  • End Long-Term Solitary Confinement. Comply with 2006 US Commission on Safety and Abuse in America’s Prisons. International human rights organizations recognize sensory deprivation is psychological torture. 
  • Provide Adequate and Nutritious Food, adequate medical care, and access to natural light.
  • Expand and Provide Constructive Programming and Privileges for Indefinite SHU Status Inmates. People in SHUs aren’t released, since there’s no constructive program available with which to qualify for parole.

Join the Hunger Strike Solidarity Coalition and bring in your school, union, community or coreligionists. Hunger Strike Solidarity So Cal Coalition (in formation) includes families, ex-prisoners & others. To get involved, 213-858-3486 or hungerstrikesolidaritysocal@gmail.com

For more information about the Five Core Demands, please visitprisonerhungerstrikesolidarity.wordpress.com  

Facebook Invite: https://www.facebook.com/events/672950029398476/

In October 2012 incarcerated people in the hunger strike came to an agreement to end all hostilities against each other, the agreement can be found here: 

http://prisonerhungerstrikesolidarity.wordpress.com/2012/09/11/short-corridor-collective-calls-for-statewide-end-to-hostilities/ 

ADDITIONAL MEDIA COVERAGE

Photos of Protesters Against Solitary Confinement - LA Daily News Media 

http://photos.dailynews.com/2013/07/photos-protesters-against-solitary-confinement/?utm_source=buffer&utm_campaign=Buffer&utm_content=buffere54e5&utm_medium=twitter#3

 Los Angeles Times:

Spanish Interviews:
Maria and Jesus Aguirre speak of their struggles with their loves in prison and the hunger strike. starts at 47 minutes.

http://archive.kpfk.org/mp3/kpfk_130709_213030vocesdelibertad.MP3

Spanish interview on Telemundo with Delia Rodriguez on the Hunger Strike:

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=4476878340187&set=o.520666777981595&type=2&theater 

Spanish coverage of the Hunger Strike:

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=4476560252235&set=o.520666777981595&type=2&theater 

——————-

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

June 30 is POC Zine Project’s One Year Tumblr Anniversary!

On June 30, 2012, The POC Zine Project Tumblr was “born” at Hive Learning Network NYC's Summer Code Party Pop-Up with Tumblr and Mozilla at DCTV. Not only did we receive help from Tumblr staff in setting up this Tumblr, POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano was able to share information in real time about POCZP at the event (see image from that day below) with attendees!

image

 

Since June of 2012, POZCP has shared information about zines by people of color and intersectional projects with the Tumblr community. We brought you daily recaps from our first-ever Race Riot! Tour last fall because it was important to us to keep you informed.

For the past year, we’ve appreciate your submissions, reblogs and feedback. Prior to the launch of the POCZP Tumblr in 2012, we were actively “listening” on Tumblr through private accounts since 2007 — tracking “zine”-tagged posts, observing how folks of color from all walks of life use Tumblr, how zinesters were using Tumblr and figuring out what our short and long term goals are for this space <3

We hope that we help make your Tumblr explorations a fun, inspiring and informative experience. If you’ve benefitted in any way from our efforts on Tumblr, please consider making a donation of any amount to POC Zine Project.

We are in the process of planning our second Race Riot! Tour and must raise $14,000 to cover the costs of a 20 city national tour, which will take place in October and November of 2013. We’ve expanded the tour to include cities in the midwest and a date in Mexico. We know we can do it but we need your help. <3 Thanks for your support.

- POC Zine Project

P.S. If you don’t have any funds—we hear ya! POCZP is a grassroots organization and we are all volunteers. We have operated without 501(c)(3) status the past three years for a reason: to stay as free as possible, so we can move as quickly as possible. Help the cause by forwarding this link to friends on your social accounts, email and by reblogging. We appreciate the love.

——————-

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

ZINE SPOTLIGHT: Tenacious: Art and Writing from Women in Prison (Issue #27)
RELEASE: December 2012
PAGES: 35
ORIGIN: New York City, USA
EDITOR: Vikki Law
DESCRIPTION FROM VIKKI:

Issue #27 includes:
a colorful Spruce Tree Dryad by a woman incarcerated in Alaska
a letter about ongoing conditions in Denver Women&#8217;s Correctional Facility
how prison staff react to holiday spirit
"It Doesn&#8217;t Matter If It&#8217;s Election Time": a response to Marianne Brown&#8217;s piece by a woman incarcerated in Colorado
letters from CeCe McDonald
mental health care in women&#8217;s prisons
living with HIV in a women&#8217;s prison

HOW TO ORDER TENACIOUS
SNAIL MAIL ONLY (for now)! To get a copy, send $3 in well-concealed cash or a check made out to V. Law to: PO Box 20388 New York, NY 10009
Here is all of Vikki&#8217;s contact info.
Be sure to indicate which issue you want (if not #27 or #28) and (if possible) provide an email address so that Vikki can contact you with any questions/requests.
READ AN EXCERPT FROM TENACIOUS #27 ONLINE
With Vikki&#8217;s permission, POCZP has made it possible for you to read an excerpt from issue #27 online, entitled &#8220;Mental Health Care in Prison&#8221; by Jane Dorotik, along with info about WORTH.

Jane is presently incarcerated in Corona, CA. You can write her at the following address (please tell her you found her info through Tenacious &amp; POC Zine Project):
Jane Dorotik
W90870
California Institution for Women, MB 114L
16756 Chino-Corona Road
Corona, CA 92880
COMMUNITY: Please consider purchasing multiple copies of Tenacious to support the series, Vikki&#8217;s important work helping to empower women who are incarcerated and activism through materiality.
&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;-
Q&amp;A WITH VIKKI LAW, EDITOR OF TENACIOUS
By POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano (@dcap)
Recorded on June 16, 2013 at ABC Nio Rio in NYC (part 1 of 4)
FIRST INSTALLMENT: THE MAKING OF TENACIOUS
DANIELA: Tell me about Tenacious issue #27. What is it about, why did you make it and did you have any support through the process?
VIKKI: I’ve been doing Tenacious since 2003&#160;(click here for an interview with Vikki from 2009). It actually wasn’t my idea to start Tenacious, which is a zine of art and writings by and from women in prison about their experiences both in prison and if they continue writing after they get out of prison. It was actually the idea of several women incarcerated in Oregon who were reading zines and magazines written by men in prison , and were seeing that their experiences were not being reflected in men prisoner writings.
They said they weren’t seeing things about dealing with their kids, or child custody issues, or maintaining contact with family, or pervasive sexual harassment they get from staff members inside prisons, so they wanted a publication that spoke about their issues and also spoke to other women so they knew they weren’t suffering these things by themselves.
Being in prison, they didn’t have access to things like stamps, postage - you know - photocopying, access to even the ability to write to other people freely. So they were looking for somebody on the other side and they asked me if I would be the outside person.
DANIELA: How did Tenacious go from an idea to an independent publication/zine?
I just started putting together Tenacious and putting it out. Originally it was me and several other young women who were also interested in supporting women in prison, getting their ideas and voices out. But because zine-making can sometimes be a very solitary experience, and working with people in prison can sometimes be this long extended process in which you don’t feel like you are making much of a difference because you can’t see anything tangible happening, or coming out of it, the other people slowly dropped out &#8230; it is work to sit there and try to figure out how to re-type stuff, or write back and forth with somebody in prison about their piece and how they might possibly make it stronger, because it’s not as well articulated as it could be&#8230;
So right now I am the only person editing Tenacious. And so for the Winter 2012 issue, which is issue #27, I just put out a call for submissions from women in prison - whether it be cisgendered women or transwomen.
DANIELA: How does putting out a call for Tenacious work? How do women in prison find out about this opportunity and how do you collect their stories from the outside?
VIKKI: I put out a call through the network of women in prison I already knew from having done support work in the past. I originally (in the early days of Tenacious) also put out a call through publications that sent free copies to women in prison.
off our backs used to send free copies to women in prison (ceased publishing in 2008). There was also a journal called Sojourner: The Women&#8217;s Forum that closed sometime in the early 2000s that not only sent free copies to women in prison, but also had an actual page or two where women in prison could write in and talk about their experiences. It was the women in prison column. So when they folded, they sent out letters to all of their women in prison readers and said &#8220;we’re really sorry, we’re closing, here are some other alternatives for free publications so you can have something to read and keep up&#8221; and they were willing to list Tenacious as one of the publications you could get free copies of and write for.
Calls for submissions have also been through word of mouth over the years. I’ve seen the people who’ve written for Tenacious shift, and you can kind of trace it to where people are sharing Tenacious in their prisons. So when I first started, I got a lot of writing and art from people incarcerated in Oregon Women’s Prison, because that is where the women were sharing copies of Tenacious.
As they were released, other women who were in other prisons started sharing it. So, for one issue, I might get 50% of my submissions from a women&#8217;s prison in Colorado, and that’s because women get copies and share them around with their friends and are like “hey!”
DANIELA: Tell me a little more about Tenacious #27, which we&#8217;re featuring as a preview in the first installment for our readers. 
Issue #27 is a variety of different writings from women in prison. There’s writings from people in Colorado, Indiana - in there’s a piece by CeCe McDonald, who is an African American transwoman incarcerated in a men’s prison in Minnesota, for defending herself against an attack on the street. There’s a couple of pieces of artwork by a transwoman named Nicky Riley, who has been incarcerated in Texas for several years. There’s a piece on lack of mental health care in California women’s prisons. 
DANIELA: Can you share some info about the history of health care and mental health care in CA? 
Several years ago, people incarcerated in CA actually sued the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR). The Supreme Court actually ruled that the lack of health care in California violated the 8th amendment against cruel and unusual punishment and put the entire prison system under what’s called a federal receivership, in which there’s someone who actually overseas how health care is run. So, basically, CDR can no longer neglect people to the extent that they have&#8230;but that doesn’t mean it’s gotten extraordinarily better, it just means that now there’s some federal oversight. 
So one woman actually writes in issue #27 about how mental health care in prison is still really inadequate, especially since there’s so many people who enter prison with mental health issues.
DANIELA: Do you do &#8220;themed&#8221; issues of Tenacious and how do you convey that information? What&#8217;s your process like?
In my call for submissions, there’s a list of experiences and ideas of what I’m looking for, so it’s not just &#8220;anything you’ve written off the top of your head!&#8221; So, specifically, &#8220;how does this relate to your experience in prison?&#8221;
One of the other goals of Tenacious is not just that women inside are able to read about other peoples’ experiences, but that people on the outside who may never have been incarcerated are able to read about experiences inside women&#8217;s prisons.
When they read, I hope they go &#8220;Wait! I never really thought about the fact that when we vote for or support things like mandatory sentencing laws, or Stop and Frisk, or are against the decriminalization of marijuana, etc. that we’re basically sentencing people to not only lose their liberty but to experience all these other atrocious aspects of prison.&#8221;
DANIELA: We&#8217;ll cover this more in the next installment, but how is your call for submissions for Tenacious #29 going?
For the upcoming issue I’ve actually gotten 4-6 pieces by women incarcerated in the women’s prison in Rhode Island, which I’ve sent one person there copies of Tenacious. Apparently she’s been sharing them around, so now I’m getting pieces from the women in Rhode Island even though I don’t have a prior relationship with any of them.
So, you can kind of trace where people are sharing copies and passing them along as something like “hey you should read this.” Also ,I don’t know if they’re encouraging their friends to write or if the women are reading Tenacious and thinking “you know, it’s not an intimidating thing to write something and send it in.”
COMMUNITY: Stay tuned for three more installments from this interview with Vikki Law that will share more issues of Tenacious.
ABOUT VIKKI LAW
Victoria Law is a writer, photographer, and mother. After a brief stint as a teenage armed robber, she became involved in prisoner support. In 1996, she helped start Books Through Bars-New York City, a group that sends free books to prisoners nationwide. In 2000, she began concentrating on the needs and actions of women in prison, drawing attention to their issues by writing articles and giving public presentations.
Since 2002, she has worked with women incarcerated nationwide to produce Tenacious: Art and Writings from Women in Prison and has facilitated having incarcerated women&#8217;s writings published in larger publications, such as Clamor magazine, the website &#8220;Women and Prison: A Site for Resistance&#8221; and the upcoming anthology Interrupted Lives. In 1995, she became involved with ABC No Rio, a collectively run arts center on New York&#8217;s Lower East Side, serving as Board Treasurer from 1997 to 2002. 
In 1997, she organized a group of activist photographers to transform one of No Rio&#8217;s upstairs tenement apartments into a black-and-white photo darkroom for community use. Since then, she has remained actively involved in coordinating (and sometimes co-teaching) free photography classes for neighborhood youth. In addition, she has participated in and curated numerous exhibitions at No Rio&#8217;s gallery, many with themes addressing social and political issues such as incarceration, grassroots efforts to rebuild New Orleans, Zapatista organizing, police brutality, and squatting. 
In 2003, she collaborated with China Martens to create &#8220;Don&#8217;t Leave Your Friends Behind,&#8221; a workshop addressing the specific (and often unacknowledged) needs of parents and children in radical movements; and has co-facilitated discussions in Baltimore, New York City, Providence, Montreal, Minneapolis, Detroit, and Boston. With Jessica Mills and China Martens, she is compiling a handbook for allies of radical parents by the same name.
VIKKI&#8217;S BOOKS
Vikki is a great example of a woman of color who makes zines and other intersectional materiality. 
Don&#8217;t Leave Your Friends Behind: Concrete Ways to Support Families in Social Justice Movements and Communities (buy here)
Resistance Behind Bars: The Struggles of Incarcerated Women 2nd ed. (buy here)
Som praise for Resistance Behind Bars

"An important contribution to the growing movement to end prisons as we know them."—Michelle Alexander, civil rights lawyer, advocate, legal scholar and author of The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness
"Law’s important book illuminates these under reported stories of individual and collective organizing by women in prison and encourages all of us to work in solidarity across prison walls to create a world that no longer includes the prison industrial complex.”—Angela Y. Davis, author of Abolition Democracy: Beyond Prison, Torture, and Empire and Professor Emerita of History of Consciousness, UC Santa Cruz
"Written in regular English, rather than academese, this is an impressive work of research and reportage."—Mumia Abu-Jamal, political prisoner and author of Live From Death Row

WATCH VIKKI TALK ABOUT GENDER AND THE PRISON INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX

 Watch part 2 of this video here.
——————-
SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT
If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.
DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

ZINE SPOTLIGHT: Tenacious: Art and Writing from Women in Prison (Issue #27)

RELEASE: December 2012

PAGES: 35

ORIGIN: New York City, USA

EDITOR: Vikki Law

DESCRIPTION FROM VIKKI:

Issue #27 includes:

  • a colorful Spruce Tree Dryad by a woman incarcerated in Alaska
  • a letter about ongoing conditions in Denver Women’s Correctional Facility
  • how prison staff react to holiday spirit
  • "It Doesn’t Matter If It’s Election Time": a response to Marianne Brown’s piece by a woman incarcerated in Colorado
  • letters from CeCe McDonald
  • mental health care in women’s prisons
  • living with HIV in a women’s prison

HOW TO ORDER TENACIOUS

SNAIL MAIL ONLY (for now)! To get a copy, send $3 in well-concealed cash or a check made out to V. Law to: 
PO Box 20388 
New York, NY 10009

Here is all of Vikki’s contact info.

Be sure to indicate which issue you want (if not #27 or #28) and (if possible) provide an email address so that Vikki can contact you with any questions/requests.

READ AN EXCERPT FROM TENACIOUS #27 ONLINE

With Vikki’s permission, POCZP has made it possible for you to read an excerpt from issue #27 online, entitled “Mental Health Care in Prison” by Jane Dorotik, along with info about WORTH.

Jane is presently incarcerated in Corona, CA. You can write her at the following address (please tell her you found her info through Tenacious & POC Zine Project):

Jane Dorotik

W90870

California Institution for Women, MB 114L

16756 Chino-Corona Road

Corona, CA 92880

COMMUNITY: Please consider purchasing multiple copies of Tenacious to support the series, Vikki’s important work helping to empower women who are incarcerated and activism through materiality.

————————————————-

Q&A WITH VIKKI LAW, EDITOR OF TENACIOUS

By POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano (@dcap)

Recorded on June 16, 2013 at ABC Nio Rio in NYC (part 1 of 4)

FIRST INSTALLMENT: THE MAKING OF TENACIOUS

DANIELA: Tell me about Tenacious issue #27. What is it about, why did you make it and did you have any support through the process?

VIKKI: I’ve been doing Tenacious since 2003 (click here for an interview with Vikki from 2009). It actually wasn’t my idea to start Tenacious, which is a zine of art and writings by and from women in prison about their experiences both in prison and if they continue writing after they get out of prison. It was actually the idea of several women incarcerated in Oregon who were reading zines and magazines written by men in prison , and were seeing that their experiences were not being reflected in men prisoner writings.

They said they weren’t seeing things about dealing with their kids, or child custody issues, or maintaining contact with family, or pervasive sexual harassment they get from staff members inside prisons, so they wanted a publication that spoke about their issues and also spoke to other women so they knew they weren’t suffering these things by themselves.

Being in prison, they didn’t have access to things like stamps, postage - you know - photocopying, access to even the ability to write to other people freely. So they were looking for somebody on the other side and they asked me if I would be the outside person.

DANIELA: How did Tenacious go from an idea to an independent publication/zine?

I just started putting together Tenacious and putting it out. Originally it was me and several other young women who were also interested in supporting women in prison, getting their ideas and voices out. But because zine-making can sometimes be a very solitary experience, and working with people in prison can sometimes be this long extended process in which you don’t feel like you are making much of a difference because you can’t see anything tangible happening, or coming out of it, the other people slowly dropped out … it is work to sit there and try to figure out how to re-type stuff, or write back and forth with somebody in prison about their piece and how they might possibly make it stronger, because it’s not as well articulated as it could be…

So right now I am the only person editing Tenacious. And so for the Winter 2012 issue, which is issue #27, I just put out a call for submissions from women in prison - whether it be cisgendered women or transwomen.

DANIELA: How does putting out a call for Tenacious work? How do women in prison find out about this opportunity and how do you collect their stories from the outside?

VIKKI: I put out a call through the network of women in prison I already knew from having done support work in the past. I originally (in the early days of Tenacious) also put out a call through publications that sent free copies to women in prison.

off our backs used to send free copies to women in prison (ceased publishing in 2008). There was also a journal called Sojourner: The Women’s Forum that closed sometime in the early 2000s that not only sent free copies to women in prison, but also had an actual page or two where women in prison could write in and talk about their experiences. It was the women in prison column. So when they folded, they sent out letters to all of their women in prison readers and said “we’re really sorry, we’re closing, here are some other alternatives for free publications so you can have something to read and keep up” and they were willing to list Tenacious as one of the publications you could get free copies of and write for.

Calls for submissions have also been through word of mouth over the years. I’ve seen the people who’ve written for Tenacious shift, and you can kind of trace it to where people are sharing Tenacious in their prisons. So when I first started, I got a lot of writing and art from people incarcerated in Oregon Women’s Prison, because that is where the women were sharing copies of Tenacious.

As they were released, other women who were in other prisons started sharing it. So, for one issue, I might get 50% of my submissions from a women’s prison in Colorado, and that’s because women get copies and share them around with their friends and are like “hey!”

DANIELA: Tell me a little more about Tenacious #27, which we’re featuring as a preview in the first installment for our readers. 

Issue #27 is a variety of different writings from women in prison. There’s writings from people in Colorado, Indiana - in there’s a piece by CeCe McDonaldwho is an African American transwoman incarcerated in a men’s prison in Minnesota, for defending herself against an attack on the street. There’s a couple of pieces of artwork by a transwoman named Nicky Riley, who has been incarcerated in Texas for several years. There’s a piece on lack of mental health care in California women’s prisons.

DANIELA: Can you share some info about the history of health care and mental health care in CA? 

Several years ago, people incarcerated in CA actually sued the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR). The Supreme Court actually ruled that the lack of health care in California violated the 8th amendment against cruel and unusual punishment and put the entire prison system under what’s called a federal receivership, in which there’s someone who actually overseas how health care is run. So, basically, CDR can no longer neglect people to the extent that they have…but that doesn’t mean it’s gotten extraordinarily better, it just means that now there’s some federal oversight.

So one woman actually writes in issue #27 about how mental health care in prison is still really inadequate, especially since there’s so many people who enter prison with mental health issues.

DANIELA: Do you do “themed” issues of Tenacious and how do you convey that information? What’s your process like?

In my call for submissions, there’s a list of experiences and ideas of what I’m looking for, so it’s not just “anything you’ve written off the top of your head!” So, specifically, “how does this relate to your experience in prison?”

One of the other goals of Tenacious is not just that women inside are able to read about other peoples’ experiences, but that people on the outside who may never have been incarcerated are able to read about experiences inside women’s prisons.

When they read, I hope they go “Wait! I never really thought about the fact that when we vote for or support things like mandatory sentencing laws, or Stop and Frisk, or are against the decriminalization of marijuana, etc. that we’re basically sentencing people to not only lose their liberty but to experience all these other atrocious aspects of prison.”

DANIELA: We’ll cover this more in the next installment, but how is your call for submissions for Tenacious #29 going?

For the upcoming issue I’ve actually gotten 4-6 pieces by women incarcerated in the women’s prison in Rhode Island, which I’ve sent one person there copies of Tenacious. Apparently she’s been sharing them around, so now I’m getting pieces from the women in Rhode Island even though I don’t have a prior relationship with any of them.

So, you can kind of trace where people are sharing copies and passing them along as something like “hey you should read this.” Also ,I don’t know if they’re encouraging their friends to write or if the women are reading Tenacious and thinking “you know, it’s not an intimidating thing to write something and send it in.”

COMMUNITY: Stay tuned for three more installments from this interview with Vikki Law that will share more issues of Tenacious.

ABOUT VIKKI LAW

Victoria Law is a writer, photographer, and mother. After a brief stint as a teenage armed robber, she became involved in prisoner support. In 1996, she helped start Books Through Bars-New York City, a group that sends free books to prisoners nationwide. In 2000, she began concentrating on the needs and actions of women in prison, drawing attention to their issues by writing articles and giving public presentations.

Since 2002, she has worked with women incarcerated nationwide to produce Tenacious: Art and Writings from Women in Prison and has facilitated having incarcerated women’s writings published in larger publications, such as Clamor magazine, the website “Women and Prison: A Site for Resistance” and the upcoming anthology Interrupted Lives. In 1995, she became involved with ABC No Rio, a collectively run arts center on New York’s Lower East Side, serving as Board Treasurer from 1997 to 2002.

In 1997, she organized a group of activist photographers to transform one of No Rio’s upstairs tenement apartments into a black-and-white photo darkroom for community use. Since then, she has remained actively involved in coordinating (and sometimes co-teaching) free photography classes for neighborhood youth. In addition, she has participated in and curated numerous exhibitions at No Rio’s gallery, many with themes addressing social and political issues such as incarceration, grassroots efforts to rebuild New Orleans, Zapatista organizing, police brutality, and squatting.

In 2003, she collaborated with China Martens to create “Don’t Leave Your Friends Behind,” a workshop addressing the specific (and often unacknowledged) needs of parents and children in radical movements; and has co-facilitated discussions in Baltimore, New York City, Providence, Montreal, Minneapolis, Detroit, and Boston. With Jessica Mills and China Martens, she is compiling a handbook for allies of radical parents by the same name.

VIKKI’S BOOKS

Vikki is a great example of a woman of color who makes zines and other intersectional materiality. 

Don’t Leave Your Friends Behind: Concrete Ways to Support Families in Social Justice Movements and Communities (buy here)

Resistance Behind Bars: The Struggles of Incarcerated Women 2nd ed. (buy here)

Som praise for Resistance Behind Bars

"An important contribution to the growing movement to end prisons as we know them."—Michelle Alexander, civil rights lawyer, advocate, legal scholar and author of The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness

"Law’s important book illuminates these under reported stories of individual and collective organizing by women in prison and encourages all of us to work in solidarity across prison walls to create a world that no longer includes the prison industrial complex.”—Angela Y. Davis, author of Abolition Democracy: Beyond Prison, Torture, and Empire and Professor Emerita of History of Consciousness, UC Santa Cruz

"Written in regular English, rather than academese, this is an impressive work of research and reportage."—Mumia Abu-Jamal, political prisoner and author of Live From Death Row

WATCH VIKKI TALK ABOUT GENDER AND THE PRISON INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX

 Watch part 2 of this video here.

——————-

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

SCENE REPORT: MOONROOT + POC Zine Project session at Allied Media Conference 2013 [Pt 1 of 3]

Allied Media Conference 2013 is from June 20 - 23, 2013. This is POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano’s recap from #AMC2013 on Friday, June 21.

Part of my advocacy—and what has informed POCZP’s focus—is to make information accessible to people of color who might not otherwise have access for a multitude of reasons. That being said, so much happened yesterday that my mind is in a whirl about what to share. I want to help those who can’t be at this year’s conference to feel like they are a part of it—that the information being shared here belongs to them too. I would not be at #AMC2013 if it wasn’t for the support of my co-presenters MOONROOT & Adela C. Licona, so I want to share what’s going on here with the POCZP community.

But how do I condense Day 1 (made up of so many experiences as a first time attendee and presenter) into one Tumblr post? Seems impossible. But instead of continuing to pace anxiously in my hotel room, I will simply share some brief notes, photos and videos from yesterday. I hope that—wherever you are, whoever you are (but especially my people of color)—you enjoy this first recap and tap into some of the excitement, inspiration, beauty and community I experienced at my first day of Allied Media Conference. Enjoy! <3

——-

DAY ONE OF WORKSHOPS AT 2013 ALLIED MEDIA CONFERENCE

Friday was our (POCZP’s) session with our allies/collaborators MOONROOT and professor Adela C. Licona. The name of our session was Zine-making Across the Diaspora.

MOONROOT folks Linda and Sine brought their zine-making materials and zine-making knowledge, as well as their positive, loving energy. If they were nervous, I could not tell. I was nervous but also excited.

SPOTTED: Linda and Sine from MOONROOT zine collective #amc2013 #zines #poczines #detroit

[DESCRIPTION: MOONROOT’s Linda (L) and Sine (R). Sine helped POCZP produce our Baltimore event last year.]

[DESCRIPTION: In this video, folks start to arrive to our session and POCZP Midwest Coordinator Joyce Hatton says hello <3]

We had a spacious & lovely art room to present in at Wayne State University in Detroit. As people began to show up to participate, all my nerves melted away. I felt so affirmed and energized by their presence.

SPOTTED: Hawa from @browntourage presentingvat #amc2013 browntourage.com

[DESCRIPTION: Hawa from @browntourage who is presenting at #amc2013 attended our session: browntourage.com. I look forward to building with them in Oakland late this fall.]

There were 40-50 people in attendance, which felt like such a blessing. There are so many incredible workshops here that overlap so I was excited and surprised when our room was at capacity.

SPOTTED: Texta felt-tip superhero www.textaqueen.com @textaaa #poczines

[DESCRIPTION: TEXTAQUEEN came to our #amc2013 session but this photo is from June 20, 2013, the day before. We are going to collaborate with TEXTA so that they can be a part of this year’s Race Riot! Tour. We just need to raise the funds! <3]

It was a transformative & inspiring experience for me to share information with other people of color who are invested in celebrating the rich history of zines/independent publications by people of color.

SPOTTED: "Zines in Third Space" author Adela and Fargo-Moorhead Zine Fest founder & POCZP Midwest Coordinator Joyce Hatton! #poczines #zines #amc2013

[DESCRIPTION: Adela (L) and POCZP Midwest Coordinator Joyce Hatton (R) at our #AMC2013 session. It was exciting to finally meet Joyce in person after months of communicating/planning via the web and phone!]

Adela explained her “third space” theory with everyone, which you can learn more about in her book “Zines in Third Space.” POC Zine Project is a “third space” too (so am I, as a person/activist)! Adela and I will do a post on “third space” theory after the conference to help explain it all. …Many of you reading this now not only function/thrive in “third spaces” but are also living & breathing examples of “third space” theory.

But yeah—our session! In addition to talking about the history of zines from a POC lens, we had fun making zines!

June 21, 2013: Folks making zines at our #amc2013 #makezines session

Some folks in attendance had never made a zine before and I was honored to be a part of their first experience.  

Folks making zines at our #amc2013 #makezines session on Friday, June 21, 2013 SPOTTED: POCZP founder Daniela & MOONROOT zine collective member Sine before their #amc2013 #makezines session

[DESCRIPTION: Co-presenters POCZP founder Daniela and MOONROOT’s Sine]

Attendees making #zines at our session at #amc2013 #makezines on June 21 2013 Folks making #zines at our #amc2013 #makezines session with MOONROOT and Adela C. LIcona on June 21 2013 Folks making and reading #zines at our #amc2013 #makezines session with MOONROOT and Adela C. Licona

SPOTTED: Gabby Rivera @quirkyrican w her first mini #zine #amc2013 #wemakezines

[DESCRIPTION: Gabby Rivera @quirkyrican smiles at lunchtime with her first mini-zine made at our session]

SPOTTED: Billione shares their mini #zine from our #makezines #amc2013 session with MOONROOT

[DESCRIPTION: Billione shares his mini-zine from our #makezines #amc2013 session with MOONROOT: getbillione.blogspot.com/]

It was also a great learning experience for me to experience condensing the history of zines (with a focus on POC history) into five minutes (I think I did ok)! Due to time constraints, I had to keep it to U.S. zine history but it’s important to note that zine culture is worldwide and that POC make zines about any topic you can think of—worldwide.

POCZP, as part of our Legacy Series, will be sharing more zines by POC from all parts of the world. Stay tune for more on that …

All the #amc2013 #makezines presenters from left to right: Adela C. Licona, Moonroot's Linda, POCZP founder Daniela and Moonroot's Sine

[DESCRIPTION: All the presenters from our session from left to right: Adela C. Licona, MOONROOT’s Linda, POCZP founder Daniela and MOONROOT’s Sine <3]

After my spur-of-the-moment call to action during the zine-making phase (which MOONROOT did a terrific job leading), 10-12 (need to check my bag again) folks who made zines donated them to the POC Zine Project archive!

Some of the mini #zines made at #amc2013 #wemakezines our session w MOONROOT

[DESCRIPTION: Some of the mini-zines folks made at our #AMC2013 #MAKEZINES session with MOONROOT and Adela C. Licona on June 21, 2013]

I will be scanning the mini-zines and sharing them with you all (with permission from the creators) on POCZP’s digital platforms and then mailing back the originals <3

After our session, I took a lunch/connect with allies/friends/resting break and then went to another workshop at #AMC2013 called Designing Games to Understand Complexity.

Spotted: people playing games at the designing games to understand complexity session at #amc2013 on June 21 2013

That experience further inspired me to create a #poczines online game to help people learn more about the rich history of zines/independent publications by people of color from the 1700s - 2000s. More on that later …

After the games workshop, I attended the #AMC2013 opening ceremony, where after an inspiring recap of AMC’s last 15 years was shared, a spontaneous dance party broke out on stage.

People rush the stage to dance at the #amc2013 opening ceremony on June 21, 2013 <3

[DESCRIPTION: #AMC2013 attendees rush the stage to dance at the June 21, 2013 opening ceremony]

It was so beautiful that for many reasons I felt my eyes filling with tears. I hope this gives you somewhat of a sense of what I was seeing and feeling.

Dancing, love and joy at the #amc2013 opening ceremony #detroit on Friday, June 21, 2013 Beautiful crowd surfing at the opening ceremony at #amc2013 #detroit. People of all ages were crowd surfing on stage! Folks workin it out after rushing the stage to dance at opening ceremony #amc2013 #detroit June 21, 2013 POCZP midwest coordinator Joyce Hatton after dancing on stage at #amc2013 #detroit on June 21, 2013 <3

[DESCRIPTION: POCZP Midwest Coordinator Joyce Hatton smiles after dancing on stage at the #AMC2013 opening ceremony on June 21, 2013]

[DESCRIPTION” People dancing at the opening ceremony on June 21, 2013 at #AMC2013. Vine by Ryann Supamakenzi]

Today (Saturday, June 22, 2013) I plan on attending another workshop and getting some free acupuncture (my first experience) and a tarot reading by Jade Fair, who you can see in the photo below. Jade Fair will be joining this year’s Race Riot! tour …

upload

 [DESCRIPTION: Jade Fair holds her first zine SOFT SERVE #1 at #AMC2013 on June 20, 2013. Interview with her coming next week <3]

I hope you enjoyed my first recap from #AMC2013. Let me know what you want to see more of! I will do my best to help make this event as accessible as possible for those who could not attend. You are here with me in spirit and I feel your support and positive energy. <3

Love & Solidarity,

Daniela Capistrano

Founder, POC Zine Project

——

ABOUT ALLIED MEDIA CONFERENCE

The Allied Media Conference is a collaborative laboratory of media-based organizing strategies for transforming our world, held every Summer in Detroit.

CREATE

At the AMC, we understand media as any way in which we communicate with the world, from zines to breakdancing, to designing neighborhood-based communications infrastructure. We share and create media that exposes, investigates, heals, builds confidence and radical hope, incites dialogue and debate. We demystify technology, not only learning how to use it, but how to design and build our own.  In doing so, we redefine technology’s role and impact in our lives. The AMC creates learning environments for all ages and skill levels, including hands-on workshops, strategy sessions, presentations and performances.

CONNECT

 The AMC is a network of networks – social justice organizers, community technologists, transformative artists, educators, entrepreneurs, and many others — all using media in innovative ways. Some of these networks sprout from the conference, grow over the course of the year then reconvene in Detroit larger and healthier. Others use the AMC as an annual point of convergence and a space to forge new relationships. Through cycles of participatory investigation and experimentation, our networks continue to grow, generating new theories and practices of media-based organizing.

TRANSFORM

As our networks grow, so does our capacity to take collective actions to transform our world. At the AMC, we develop new leaders and new forms of leadership, design new methods of problem-solving, cultivate the visions of our communities and build our power to make those visions real. 

——————-

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh