POC ZINE PROJECT

Posts tagged feminist

Just some sweet and simple anon love: thank you for existing. — Asked by Anonymous

Hi Anon,

Thanks so much for the love. We have been busy! In 2013 (among other initiatives) POCZP led multiple free workshops across the country, presented at Allied Media Conference, Chicago Zine Fest and L.A. Zine Fest to share knowledge, tabled at multiple zine fests in solidarity with local POC, curated & wrote a list of 50 zines by QTPOC, organized & executed a national #RaceRiotTour traveling community experiment, coordinated a massive donation of zines by POC to multiple libraries, continued our Legacy Series work to share influential materiality by POC, provided mini-grants to 20 creators of color, and worked with over 50 volunteers across the country - all as a volunteer entity.

As the recipient of this year’s Long Arm Stapler Award and with our name being dropped in mainstream publications (thanks, Kathleen Hanna!), we are doing our best to graciously navigate public recognition.

Endorsements are great, but what we really need is the resources to be able to continue our important work in 2014 and beyond as a grassroots nonprofit. We consider our work important because we exist to empower people of color to share their stories and to build community. 

We also collaborate with - and disrupt - academic spaces with the intention of being a third space resource.

If you are reading this and believe in POCZP, please donate what you can so that we can continue operations. We aren’t supported by a fiscal sponsor and don’t have an operating budget, and yet we were about to achieve so much this year because we are people-powered. We defy limitations by daring to believe in community.

But we need your help — now more than ever. If you would like to be a part of POCZP’s restructuring phase in 2014, email poczineproject@gmail.com. Help us create a sustainable funding model and access resources.

Please reblog this post and share the donation link with friends. Thank you <3

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

P.S. We are nothing without you, so thank YOU for existing.

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2014. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to ongoing advocacy costs, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

We are rebooted our org structure in 2014 and will be transparent about that process. Stay tuned.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

brassinpocket-booklyn:

Curators Aimee Lusty and Kate Wadkins seek submissions for a feminist art zine to be released at the close of BRASS IN POCKET, a group show opening Friday, September 13, 2013 at Booklyn Artists Alliance. For more info, click here.BRASS IN POCKET opens tonight at Booklyn Artists Alliance art gallery.

POCZP ally Kate Wadkins shared this call! &lt;3

brassinpocket-booklyn:

Curators Aimee Lusty and Kate Wadkins seek submissions for a feminist art zine to be released at the close of BRASS IN POCKET, a group show opening Friday, September 13, 2013 at Booklyn Artists Alliance. For more info, click here.

BRASS IN POCKET opens tonight at Booklyn Artists Alliance art gallery.

POCZP ally Kate Wadkins shared this call! <3

ZINESTER SPOTLIGHT: Celina Williams, Zinester & Librarian in Virginia

Some of Celina Williams' zines: POC zinester and librarian in Richmond, VA

[DESCRIPTION: Some of Celina Williams’ own zines. Photo credit: Celina]

By Cata, POCZP East Coast Intern/Coordinator

Celina Williams is a zinester, a librarian of special collections and a Richmond Zine Fest organizer for 5+ years. You can visit Celina and a zine collection within the James Branch Cabell Library in Richmond, VA.

Check out Richmond Zine Fest, happening this year on October 5th! Find out more at richmondzinefest.org. Richmond Zine Fest has been going strong in Richmond, VA, since 2007.

From Celina:

Richmond Zine Fest registration for workshops and tablers is open… if you know of any folks who’d be available/interested to participate Saturday Oct. 5th, I’d be happy to answer any questions.

POCZP’S Q&A WITH CELINA

POCZP: How long have you been making zines?

CELINA: Consciously, for the past 6+ years. When I was a kid I would play around with the stapler and make little books—those are zines right!?

POCZP: Nice! What kind of zines do you make currently?

CELINA: I make poetry and photo zines. My latest issue is Mean Girls and it’s about being told I look mean because I don’t smile. So it got me thinking about the mean/nice binary. Also, being a black and Hispanic woman, I am used to people commenting about my demeanor and look, they often say “what are you?”

POCZP: Any ideas for future zines?

CELINA: Actually, yes!! A friend and I were walking and noticing how trees often have these beautiful designs that often look look like vaginas, so a collaboration zine soon to be made will be called In the Tree’s Vagina.

POCZP: Awesome. Man, I can think of a lot of trees that would be perfect for your zine haha! Switching gears a bit, why do you think making zines is important?

CELINA: Well, I am a librarian and I view zines as creating a kind of archive for yourself. I see zines like that. But it’s an archive that you share. For example my mom bought me a diary when I was younger; but it felt weird to write and not share.

POCZP: Wow!! I love that because it makes me think of one of my favorite quotes “an untold story is the greatest burden” by Alice Walker.

CELINA: Right! And self-publication in zines is cool because in academia there is this rigid way you have to be—and that just doesn’t exist in zines.

POCZP: Any other things your working on?

CELINA: Yes! I am reorganizing the zine collection at our library (yes we have a zine collection!) and after this interview I will be finding out a way to tag and measure POC representation in our collection.

POCZP: That’s awesome! Let POC Zine Project know if you need any support! Any last exciting things happening in your community?

CELINA: Thank-you! and yes…Shout out to Richmond Zine Fest Co-organizers!! Which I’ve been a part of for the past 5+ years. Also, it was just international zine month so don’t forget to check out new zines!!

POCZP: Thank you!

</end>

CONTACT CELINA

celinanicoledoes.tumblr.com

Twitter.com/celinanicole

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

Let’s Talk About: ‘The Truth Tour and how to be an ally at POC and Native events’

image

By Cata, POCZP East Coast Intern

The Truth Tour consists of folks from the Pine Ridge reservation of South Dakota and allies, traveling to different cities in the Midwest and mid-Atlantic to tell their stories, advocating for a return to matriarchal leadership and raising awareness of the ongoing genocide of their people. The event I attended was a film screening of the documentary “Red Cry,” held in Washington, DC, on April 16th.

Below is an entry point into a continuous conversation, not a rule book. 

A big question that surrounds POC (people of color) events from those outside of the community holding the event is "how can I be an ally?"

A simple answer to these questions is to put your self in service to the community and don’t take up space. 

DC ‘TRUTH TOUR' EVENT RECAP

April 16 – Washington, DC – Metropolitan Community Church of DC – 6:30pm

When the Lakota Grandmothers came to DC in April, my partner and I cooked a meal for an event as an act of support/solidarity. What follows here are my reflections as an audience member/participant in the film screening event.

I write with a strong desire to contribute to a (hopefully) ongoing conversation of allyship. The night of the event in DC there were many important voices and stories shared. The group had come a long way to spread their voices. I am thankful for their journey. I felt blessed to be among these strong travelers and hope to meet them again one day.

However, among the powerful stories offered there were important voices and stories that were missed. Here are some things I observed as I watched the evening pass with a complex interplay of isms and unchecked privileges.

For days afterward I couldn’t get out of my head the Q&A session after the “Red Cry” screening. 

The white anarchist/activist who stood up and said “I don’t know about the rest of the room, but me and my house mates on THIS side of the room- we’re REALLY in SOLIDARITY with you all! REALLY!”

This wasn’t a question; it was a comment offered perhaps to receive an ego stroke from the audience/caravaners and it was distracting.

Then, there was an African-American woman who stood up asking to be part of the Lakota people, referencing her own Native heritage. It was refreshing to see a person of color seeking to honor their indigenous heritage— but the word use: “Can I be a part of you?” made my face scrunch.

Again, this was not a question pertaining to their journey or to the film.

Then, three or four folks raised their hands… again without questions… but instead with gifts. Literally folks were walking up to an elder with shells, books and bags of what? I don’t know.

Weird? Yes. Distracting? Yes. Ego strokes? Yes and yes.

Three-quarters of the way through the event, the main Native male speaker who had been speaking the most and facilitating, acknowledged that the others on his caravan, including most of the women, had not spoken. He suggested that they go down the line and share something.

"Yes, finally!" I thought, time to hear everyones voice. But, wait. One more person in the audience needs the spot light and asks a question/comment…then POOF! Our time is done.

A song is sung and things are wrapped up. There is never time to hear the voices of the other Native folks, most of them women, from the caravan.

NEXT STEPS

As POC organizers we need to reflect:

  • On this Truth Tour designed to advocate a return to matriarchy, how did the Native man facilitating (and the crew as a whole) not realize that his voice was filling the time available at the expense of other (female) voices from the caravan?
  • How do we as POC organizers/activists let inter-communities privileges distract or disappear an important layer in our events or projects? 
  • How did the audience continue on unaware of their distracting behavior?
  • Why did certain audience members(and why do some folks) think it was/is ok to deconstruct their internal conflicts on some one else’s time?

This brings me back to allyship. Here are some ways to be an ally:

1) Be aware of your layers (gender, colourism, class, race, orientation, shyness etc).

2) Take your OWN time to process privilege, settlers guilt etc.

3) Do your service, go home and process in your journal or with other allies about your experience and how to be a better ally next time.

It’s all good. We are all learning here, but to distract from someone else’s event/or project with your own internal conflicts is unchecked privilege. To disappear someone else’s voice or story with your own, no matter if you’re an ally or a member of the community is rude. These patterns disrupt progress.

Privileges unchecked and unprocessed hurt ourselves and our communities. Until we learn as how to beware of our layers and hold one another accountable the biggest thing that will come of our events and projects in the eyes of others (and maybe ourselves) is debriefing the distractions.

Distractions are annoying. And, distractions are NOT solidarity. Lets move the focus back.

NYC ‘TRUTH TOUR’ EVENT RECAP

April 8, 2013 – New York City, NY, Judson Memorial Church- 239 Thompson St. (Solidarity/Decolonization Training) – 7:00pm

By Anonymous contributor to POCZP

I attended the Indigenous Solidarity and Decolonizing Training at Judson Memorial Church in hopes of learning more about the Lakota people, their struggles, and what it means to be in solidarity with indigenous communities. I was looking forward to participating in conversations about the meaning of decolonization and how one develops and sustains a political praxis around decolonizing the self in relation to community.

These days I have been thinking a lot about what it means for me, a women of color to challenge the mindset of settler colonialism that is part of my privilege and my immigrant histories. I believe that the complexities of communities of color engaging with native and indigenous communities should not be limited to understand through reading books and watching documentaries, so I went to this event to listen, to learn, to say hello.

I have deep respect the leaders of this training, for their histories and communities, and for the ways in which they walk through this world. However what I experienced last night was triggering, frustrating, and very confusing.

All but one of the Lakota grandmothers was present and the reason for this was never clearly explained or discussed. We began by asking those in the room who have any European ancestry, to stand up. As expected nearly eighty plus percent of the room were of European descent; I was one of few women of color, and perhaps South Asian in the room who did not stand up.

I have a vague understand of the purpose of this exercise, to call attention to the active realities of colonization as part of people’s being, and that as privilege that you cannot erase. However the presenters did not once ask any questions or specifically engage with the people of color in the room to ask why there were present, what it means for people of color to experience colonialism, and how the displacement of communities of color can reinforce colonial oppressions that native peoples face.

Once again white people became the center focus of the discussion, a conversation that I am sick in tired of having.

How can we destroy the constructs of whiteness if we continually reify them in our political spaces through reliving trauma and shaming one another?

There were several instances where the main “teacher” of this “training” used disparaging language against biracial and multiracial people. They outlined the role of elderly women, or the grandmothers in the struggle without giving the elderly women in the room a chance to speak out on their own and share their stories.

There was a moment where a white man was being disruptive and the presenter challenged him on his behavior, but did not ask him to leave the room. Of course this man continued to be disruptive and my friend, a women of color, had to ask him to leave.

I could give further specifics and in detail but I am not interested in calling out the presenter or the organizers of this event. Rather, I write this to raise the question of how can we build solidarity and decolonize together when so many of our political spaces are dominated by the politics of whiteness and by those whom I gender as being male-identified and male-bodied?

What is it going to take for men to recognize their male-privilege and to step down, work together on building true allyship with women in the struggle, and to call each other out?

There is a lot to say about this training. I am vested in having these conversations in person, and with people I hope to build my politics and community with.

However, in sharing this, I hope we can have a more open and honest dialogue about how to challenge spaces that are political defunct in the moment, and how to create something new that has a liberating direction.

Editor’s Note: POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano attended the NYC Truth Tour date and put a call for feedback on the POCZP Facebook page. Subsequently, Daniela spoke with this anonymous contributor, who gave POCZP permission to publish their thoughts under the condition that they remain anonymous. POCZP respects their choice to remain anonymous, as often it can be very difficult and triggering as a POC to question POC-led movements/actions.

MORE ON THE APRIL 8 NYC TRUTH TOUR EVENT

Below are POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano’s thoughts on the NYC Truth Tour event, originally published on the POCZP Facebook page. She also recorded this positive moment at the end of the evening:

[DESCRIPTION: The event leaders asked attendees to participate in a round dance at the end of the event. Couples were placed in the middle circle, while the elders were in another circle around it. After a while, others who weren’t necessarily elders were encouraged to join the outer circle. Native and non-native folks participated in the dance. This video captures about 80% of the round dance duration.]

By Daniela Capistrano, POCZP founder

The event overall was (for folks we spoke to) very triggering and complex. I wish that more female elders spoke, since that is what the tour is about. However, I also understand that there is another related event where female elders will be speaking.

This event wasn’t an “easy” experience. Some folks said there wasn’t enough actual training and that it was more of a blame game. Others did not agree with this assessment at all and said they got a lot out of it.

The event leaders asked everyone at the start of the experience “to listen with your heart.” Some people in attendance had a very had time just listening and there were many privilege issues at play. One white male would not stop interjecting and made it all about him until he was asked to stop. He could not handle that feedback and left.

Another white male took up way too much time singing a “spiritual” song, making the focus about him instead of the elders. A white female spoke on behalf of a black male in attendance without his consent. Many interesting and triggering actions went down last night at this event, a microcosm of bigger issues at play …

Some participants had issues with being put on the spot based on race, class and gender. Another controversial facet of the training was when attendees were challenged to cut up their government IDs as a symbol of their commitment to decolonize. Clearly there are many factors that would inform someone’s decision to participate or not, such as citizenship status in the U.S. and the dangerous ramifications of not having ID while experiencing racial profiling or worse. Race, class and gender were also factors.

One could argue that this act of cutting up an ID meant nothing and was in fact hurtful to undocumented folks in attendance or others in tenuous circumstances. Lots to think about. But I aired on the side of listening with an open mind and staying until the end. I chose to cut up my ID to confront my privileges; to know what it felt like to destroy government issued materiality; and to think about all the privileges that made it so “easy” for me to cut up my ID without any real consequences. I did it for myself, didn’t judge those who didn’t and also doesn’t think that cutting an ID automatically “decolonized” my existence and mental state. For me, it was an act of undoing mental damage tied to identity politics.

I am glad that I did stay until the end of the event, because I was able to meet one of the female elders, who I hope will collaborate with POCZP on the Race Riot tour this fall, as #IdleNoMore is our core focus. 

Because I stayed until the end, I was able to capture the round dance on video, which had a very peaceful and healing affect for many who participated.

In closing, it’s 100% OK to not agree with all facets of a decolonizing event. It’s OK to not agree with the leaders and to walk out when you feel triggered. Several people did walk out. But I am glad that I stayed.

NOTICE: POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano reached out to Truth Tour organizers in April to share feedback and to discuss a possible collaboration for the Race Riot! tour. She also reached out again upon publishing this piece. We are patiently awaiting a response.

COMMUNITY: Help make this a productive conversation by adding your thoughts in your reblog.

RESOURCES

Educate yourself on what the Truth Tour is all about:

"Red Cry" information:

"Red Cry" premiered on April 1, 2013, at the Mother Butler Center in Rapid City, SD in Lakota Territory.  It was shown on consecutive nights in other cities as part of the Lakota Truth Tour.

Limited quantities of the Red Cry DVD are available for free.  If you would like a DVD sent to you, Truth Tour organizers request that you give a donation of $5 or more to cover the costs of shipping and materials.

Please mail your address and a check made payable to “Lakota Solidarity Project” to:

Lakota Solidarity Project
PO Box 881
Asheville, NC 28801

If you would like to show the film in your area, they ask that you download the Organizer Toolkit and use this as a model for how to organize the screening. Contact them if you are interested in screening “Red Cry.”

DONATE to the Lakota Solidarity Project/Truth Tour via PayPal by clicking here.

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“Let’s Talk About…” is an experimental series by POCZP created to share communal knowledge, resources and reflections on a wide range of topics affecting communities of color.

If you are a person of color—or a white person with a history of supporting POC Zine Project— who wants to contribute to “Let’s Talk About…” submit to poczineproject@gmail.com with “Let’s Talk About” in the subject line. 

All submissions to “Let’s Talk About…” will be compiled into a zine (print & digital) that will be released by POCZP in December of 2013.

_____________________

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: Tom Girl #3, the Gender issue
Tom Girl is a feminist zine consisting of collages and writing. 
DEADLINE: First week of July, 2013 - the absolute last day is July 5.
From Judith:
Hello Everybody, I&#8217;m having a call for submissions for issue three of Tom Girl! The theme for this issue is Gender. I know it&#8217;s a very broad topic but that&#8217;s why I wanted to discuss it. There is so much under the umbrella of gender, which is one of the main reasons I wanted to have a call for submissions.
I only have my perspective, and I can read and research all I want but it&#8217;s not the same as a first person account. When it comes to gender, everybody has an opinion, personal experience, a story. I wanted to expand this zine by adding many other voices.
In addition to that I wanted to answer a few specific questions:
 Is gender even necessary/real? If so why?
If gender is real/necessary, what does it mean to be a &#8220;woman&#8221; or a &#8220;man&#8221;, outside of traditional gender roles?
Are woman and men truly different or has society told us so?  
And I wanted to discuss gender beyond traditional &#8220;female&#8221; and &#8220;male&#8221;, trans*, gender fluid etc. I want everything from poetry to drawings to essays. As long as it fits within the theme. If you are not sure if your idea or piece fits within the parameters, please feel free to email me. 
When is this due??? All submissions are do around the first week of July (July1-July 5) and the absolute last day is July 5.Where do I submit/send comments, questions, concerns??? email at simplebutchic247@gmail.com
&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;
ABOUT JUDITH
I’m Judith. I have an old name to match my old soul. Multiracial. Feminist but more of a Womanist. I love foreign films, tea, Brits, cats, and diy projects. I adore vintage/retro clothes and hair. Lastly, I am involved in to many TV shows and am shipping to many characters.
I am also a contributor to the feminist collective The Wandering and Inconnu.
instagram: simplebutchic
tumblr: pigsthatfly.tumblr.com
GET PAST ISSUES OF TOM GIRL ZINE HERE.
&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;
Editor’s Note: A Community Submission OR Call for Submissions post is usually from POC folk submitting their own zine or zine call to be featured by POCZP. If you would like to share your zine with the POC Zine Project community, here’s how to do it.
When you submit your zine, feel free to add some background, a description of your work and art and your mission statement. If you just send us the name of your zine, we’ll simply link back to a source for purchasing it and use the language you already have on your site.
Please make sure to include pertinent info for CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: deadline, submission info/email/tumblr, related links, your own bio, etc.
As long as the zine was created/co-created by a person of color, we will always share Community Submissions. Enjoy!
POCZP also accepts anonymous submissions and zine donations from POC. Click here for submission guidelines.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: Tom Girl #3, the Gender issue

Tom Girl is a feminist zine consisting of collages and writing. 

DEADLINE: First week of July, 2013 - the absolute last day is July 5.

From Judith:

Hello Everybody, I’m having a call for submissions for issue three of Tom Girl! The theme for this issue is Gender. I know it’s a very broad topic but that’s why I wanted to discuss it. There is so much under the umbrella of gender, which is one of the main reasons I wanted to have a call for submissions.

I only have my perspective, and I can read and research all I want but it’s not the same as a first person account. When it comes to gender, everybody has an opinion, personal experience, a story. I wanted to expand this zine by adding many other voices.

In addition to that I wanted to answer a few specific questions:

  •  Is gender even necessary/real? If so why?
  • If gender is real/necessary, what does it mean to be a “woman” or a “man”, outside of traditional gender roles?
  • Are woman and men truly different or has society told us so?  

And I wanted to discuss gender beyond traditional “female” and “male”, trans*, gender fluid etc. I want everything from poetry to drawings to essays. As long as it fits within the theme. If you are not sure if your idea or piece fits within the parameters, please feel free to email me. 

When is this due??? All submissions are do around the first week of July (July1-July 5) and the absolute last day is July 5.

Where do I submit/send comments, questions, concerns??? email at simplebutchic247@gmail.com

———————————

ABOUT JUDITH

I’m Judith. I have an old name to match my old soul. Multiracial. Feminist but more of a Womanist. I love foreign films, tea, Brits, cats, and diy projects. I adore vintage/retro clothes and hair. Lastly, I am involved in to many TV shows and am shipping to many characters.

I am also a contributor to the feminist collective The Wandering and Inconnu.

instagram: simplebutchic

tumblr: pigsthatfly.tumblr.com

GET PAST ISSUES OF TOM GIRL ZINE HERE.

———————————

Editor’s Note: A Community Submission OR Call for Submissions post is usually from POC folk submitting their own zine or zine call to be featured by POCZP. If you would like to share your zine with the POC Zine Project community, here’s how to do it.

When you submit your zine, feel free to add some background, a description of your work and art and your mission statement. If you just send us the name of your zine, we’ll simply link back to a source for purchasing it and use the language you already have on your site.

Please make sure to include pertinent info for CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: deadline, submission info/email/tumblr, related links, your own bio, etc.

As long as the zine was created/co-created by a person of color, we will always share Community Submissions. Enjoy!

POCZP also accepts anonymous submissions and zine donations from POC. Click here for submission guidelines.

Help POC Zine Project find a publishing partner for the poverty zine series

COMMUNITY: We need referrals to publishers who can help us print the first poverty zine series issue. Email daniela@dcapmedia.com or submit here.

Folks who actively support us finding a publisher will be credited on a special “thank you” page within the zine on on the upcoming resource website.

TALKING POINTS

We want to print an initial release of 500 copies of a 30 page zine (equivalent of 8-10 pieces of letter sized paper folded to 30 pages, double sided).

The zines need to be printed on waterproof material so that they are durable and withstand being exposed to the elements (we want to be realistic about community needs - a paper zine won’t work).

PROGRESS SO FAR

We received an initial quote of over 10k. This is unrealistic for us, at around $20 per zine. We are hoping to get in-kind donations or a significant discount, which we would use in conjunction with funds raised through a publishing partner network.

HOW YOU CAN HELP

1. Recommend and connect us with potential publishers! We’re especially eager to partner with independent publishers with a history of supporting community-based movements addressing poverty.

2. If you are an individual, or part of a university/collective/etc. who can support fundraising efforts for publishing the poverty zine series, contact Daniela at daniela@dcapmedia.com.

She will explain the process and detail the mutually beneficial outcomes of collaborating as part of this publishing partner network.

WHY WE NEED SUPPORT

The zines will be given away for free through DIY distribution partners nationwide, including participating agencies that serve populations living at or below the poverty line. This series will also be available as paper-based zines that anyone can reproduce and share, and available as an e-zine and (coming soon) website.

POC Zine Project is a grassroots advocacy platform. We do not have a consistent source of funding and this is intentional. We are for finding solutions by building community with like-minded individuals and organizations.

Please share! #signalboost ♥ Thank you.

- POC Zine Project

P.S. We are still looking for submissions from people (of any background) who have experience living at or below the poverty line. Click here for submission criteria and please share this with anyone you know who might be interested in participating.

We are especially eager to include stories from folks affected by Hurricane Sandy.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: A Zine about Mixed-Race Queer & Feminist Experience

Hi y’all,

Lior, Lil, and Lee at Bluestockings in NYC are working on a new zine about mixed-race queer and feminist experience. Here is their call for submissions:

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS A Zine about Mixed-Race Queer & Feminist Experience

Deadline: December 15th, 2012

Hey, mixed-race folks, how do you respond when you get asked what you are? Do you feel at a loss for words when trying to describe your racial, ethnic, or cultural background? Do you find yourself struggling to understand where you belong in the context of prominent racial paradigms? Do you run into a POC-white binary that is reductive, incomplete, or simply not enough? What does it mean that there often isn’t an easy answer? And what happens when you add gender, feminism, and queerness into the mix?

Hey, queers and feminists, let’s respond to the lack of representation of mixed-race folks like us. Yes, we are deeply indebted to the countless beautiful queers and feminists of color who have demanded to be heard; who fight, survive, and die on a daily basis. We are indebted to colonized people and feminists of color around the world and in the states who have taught us that black and brown are beautiful; who have shown us how to act with compassion and love and thoughtful rage in the face of white supremacist violence.

This zine is a call to continue this work; to build upon the work of anti-racist and decolonial literature, given the nuances of our lives as mixed-race queers and feminists, so often living on stolen land while refusing to forget the land stolen from our ancestors.

No doubt, racism against folks of color is fucking real, and those of us who are mixed race and sometimes or always pass as white are much less prone to the multiple forms of violence faced by black and brown folks. However, too often, that’s the end of the conversation.

This zine strives to challenge the narrow conception of POC vs white, a binary which doesn’t allow space for many folks’ experiences or for more complex identities (even among POCs and white folks).

As mixed-raced queers and feminists, we refuse to whitewash our histories.

We refuse to label individuals based solely upon our perceptions of their skin color or features. Colonialism attempts to whitewash, erase, assimilate and subjugate through violence and oppression.

We refuse to finish this work. We invite you to collectively participate in this refusal.

A Working Definition of Mixed-race

While this may not be the perfect term, we are using it to frame a very broad set of experiences and identities, which may include tracing all or part of one’s culture or heritage to brown people and colonized people, inclusive of all skin tones. This may also include being raised with multiple cultures or with immigrant experience.

Why Queers & Feminists?

Not only are we interested in the ways that mixed-race folks’ identities interact with queerness and feminism, but we also believe that it is important to prioritize stories from queers and feminists, whose voices are often marginalized.

Moreover, with a topic as broad as race, we want to anchor our discussions in some common politics. This anchor is important because it is a big part of how we (the editors) choose who to organize with, live with, form community with, fuck, and, in this case, write zines with.

Possible Topics

Privilege. [Not] Passing. Sex, relationships & dating. Conflicting and conflated identities (especially related to race and queerness, transness, feminism, class, dis/ability). The POC/white binary. Cultural appropriation. Structural and institutional oppression. Art, music & creativity. [Not] Belonging. Cultural estrangement. Immigrant experiences. Families & histories. Colonizing processes in family, work, activisms & relationships. Being too brown/not brown enough. Home. Diaspora. Performing identities. Physical manifestations of race, and intersection with other forms of identity and presentation. Preserving and paying respect to heritage & history (eg: interviews, oral histories, folklore). Remembering. Tracing origins and roots. The importance of race/ethnicity/culture to political formation. Mixed-race community. Food & recipes. Remedies. Developing new language(s). Race/religion overlap (and exclusion). And much, much more.

Media and formats

Poetry, prose, essay, visuals (B&W for zine, possibly color online), audio (for online), interviews, and other formats (pitch them to us!— we’re good catchers).

Deadline for submissions

December 15th, 2012.

Submit to  mrqfzine@gmail.com.

Contact:  mrqfzine@gmail.com www.mrqfzine.tumblr.com (See tumblr for information on the editors.)

You can also follow the making of this zine on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mrqfzine

About the Editors

Lee Naught is a radical, genderqueer, homo, chican@ organizer who has participated in a variety of collective, feminist, and sexuality-based projects. They grew up in confusing, undulating, and ultimately class-privileged environments; raised on one side by their Mexican mom, tía, grandma, and older sister in SoCal, with additional parenting on the other side by their gringo dad and sometimes by step-moms, too. These days they also get to share family space with their queer collective home in Brooklyn, NY. Lee spends most of their time working as a collective member at Bluestockings Bookstore, in addition to sex educating with Fuckin’ (A) (also known as the NY Radical Sex Positivity Project). Lee plays drums in a queer cuddlecore band, and enjoys bikes, politically rowdy queers, cooking vegan enchiladas for a friendly crowd, watching too much Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and pretty much anything that involves excessive glitter. Through this zine, Lee hopes to do some learning from other folks whose histories contain both colonization and race privilege, and folks thinking about the ways that queerness and gender non-conformity impact their relationship with their ethnicity.

Lior is a homo-queer musician, jewish-moroccan radical educator, interested in collectively cultivating the fierce political power of brown love and loving brown; which he learned about from Audre Lorde, his Ima and abuelita. Most recently, Lior was teaching a poetry class to high-school sophomores that focused on works by queers and women of color. Over summer, he played guitar in the downtown musical The Material World. And currently, he is an advocate-counselor at a high school in Brooklyn. Lior is hoping for lots of submissions from other brown and arab jews who are making the connections between apartheid, zionism and mizrahi struggles; who are telling their stories and the stories of their families: from the violence of assimilation/immigration, to being complicit in zionist colonization, to the love bubbling so patiently in grandmother’s kitchen. Lior plays guitar in the post-punk-dance band Gay Panic and the cuddle-core band Kitty and The Fags. He is also behind the acoustic project Music Was My First Gay Lover.

Lil Lefkowitz is a mixed-race, queer, second generation, latina with a passion for feminisms that create space for a myriad of complex identities, orientations, and experiences (read: a tica with attitude). Lil’s endeavors in new york city have been varied distinct and include being an Upward Bound creative writing instructor, a community supported agriculture project organizer, and a nonprofit worker at a women’s foundation. Lil recently graduated with a degree in women gender studies, sociology, and queer studies and now works as a community support worker with developmentally disabled adults. It is Lil’s hope that the MRQF zine will incite a discussion about the many nuances that comprise mixed-race queer folks’ identities specifically within the diasporic experience.

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PLEASE SIGNAL BOOST

We’ll definitely be adding this zine to the archive once it’s complete <3

- POC Zine Project

FREE RIDE UPDATE: SLC Queer/Feminist Zine Fest 2012

Hi y’all,

The submission deadline was October 25, so we are no longer reviewing applications from folks to attend the SLC Queer/Feminist Zine Fest on November 10. All those who submitted prior to the deadline and met the criteria will be sponsored, and have been notified.

We know this sponsorship offering limited who could participate (we’re 100% DIY and volunteer). We were only able to sponsor POC folks who could get to NYC on their own and we agreed to cover their travel to SLC and back to the NYC pickup point.

It’s clear that many of you in other states are interested in attending zine fests, and need help with covering the costs. 

We hope that zine fest organizers and zine librarians at academic institutions consider this need for future events and how financial hardship prevents some people from participating. By combining funding sources from different departments and partnering with the on-campus zine fest or community zine fest to do additional fundraising, it is possible to offer a few sponsorships.

We would especially like to see more POC attend these events. 

It’s important to build community and work through class struggle together. With that in mind, we will be offering sponsorship to some folks - REGARDLESS OF WHERE THEY LIVE IN THE WORLD - to attend our first national poc zinester + ally conference in 2014. Stay tuned for updates.

<3

COMMUNITY: If you would like to see more zine fests and other DIY events help combat class struggle by working in sponsorships, reblog this post and add the name of the fest or event you’d like to see this happen at and why this is important to you.

If you have time, be sure to also contact the organizers directly and ask them to create a sponsorship program so that some folks facing financial hardship can attend and participate. We’ll do the same!

Love,

POC Zine Project

Hey! I came to the Death By Audio event this Sunday and was super inspired by all the readings, that I am creating my own 'zine! As a young radical latina womynist growing up in bushwick and the lower east side, I want to share my experiences, challenges and reflections with a larger community. I'm really excited about the POC zine project, and I read on the homepage that y'all are compiling stories from the tour and I would like to contribute.. so let me know how to do that, thanks! -ingrid — Asked by Anonymous

Hi Anon aka Ingrid!

Thanks for sharing you feedback on our Race Riot! tour finale at DBA! Anyone who attended any of our tour dates and/or participated as a volunteer, performer, zine partner or ally can contribute by emailing daniela@dcapmedia.com and putting “RACE RIOT TOUR ZINE” in the subject line. 

We’re in the middle of figuring out content and format, so as people reach out we’ll group their interests and contribution suggestions by topic and then share the bigger picture with everyone when we’re ready.

Also, we’re psyched to hear you’re going to create your own zine! Please consider submitting it to our archive when you’re ready and letting us know when it’s available so we can help signal boost. <3

- POC ZINE PROJECT

Race Riot! Tour Recap: Brooklyn! @ Death By Audio on Oct 7, 2012 

Ten days have passed since our Race Riot! tour finale event at Death By Audio in Brooklyn. Our last tour date had the most amount of people in attendance, and zine partner sales were higher than any other stop on our tour, so thank you NYC for your love and support!

We’re going to do a zine and art book about our first tour experience, (details coming soon) so for now, here are some beautiful moments from October 7, 2012:

Photo by @inzombia of @croadcore at Death By Audio on Oct 7, 2012 POC Zine Project Race Riot! Tour

- Cristy C. Road gets the crowd at Death By Audio to sing “Tell It to My Heart" by Taylor Dayne before she begins reading from Spit and Passion

Photo by Mimi Thi Nguyen

B&W:Crowd for POCZP's Race Riot! tour finale at Death By Audio on Oct 7 2012

- POC Zine Project’s Race Riot! Tour attendees at Death by Audio on Oct 7, 2012

8mm: Mimi reads for POCZP's race riot! tour finale at Death By Audio on Oct 7 2012

- Mimi Thi Nguyen reads at Death By Audio

tint: Attendee's listen to Mimi at POCZP's Race Riot! tour finale at Death By Audio on Oct 7

Leshaun lovell (l) Share roman (m) and Jade Fair (r) at POCZP's Race Riot! Tour stop at Death By Audio on Oct 7

Leshaun lovell (l) Share roman (m) and Jade Fair (r) at POCZP’s Race Riot! Tour stop at Death By Audio on Oct 7


rev: DJ Shomi Noise holding her zines Building Up Emotional Muscles #1-3 at Death By Audio on Oct 7

- DJ Shomi Noise holding her zines Building Up Emotional Muscles #1-3 at Death By Audio on Oct 7


Photo by @maryxmas - Shady Hawkins performing at DBA on Oct 7, 2012

Shady Hawkins perform at Death By Audio

Photo by Mary Christmas

rev: Mimi, Cristy and Suzy X from Shady Hawkins on Oct 7 2012 at Death By Audio #nyc

- Mimi (l), Cristy (m) and Suzy X (r) from the band Shady Hawkins chill on stage 


rev: Joan Chen who brought us #poczines from the Bay Area for the archive & tabled at Death By Audio on Oct 7

- Joan Chen came all the way from the west coast and brought Bay Area poc zines for the archive! <3 Thanks, Joan!


Photo by @inzombia - Anna Vo reads at DBA on Oct 7 2012

- Back of crowd during Anna Vo’s reading at Death By Audio

Photo by Mimi Thi Nguyen

rev: Osa reads at DBA on Oct 7, 2012

- Osa Atoe, creator of the Shotgun Seamstress series (out now on Mend My Dress Press), reads at Death By Audio


Aye Nako performs at Race Riot! tour finale at DBA on Oct 7, 2012

- Aye Nako performs at Death By Audio

Photo by thetenderestheart

Photo by @inzombia - Part of the Race Riot! Mall at DBA on Oct 7, 2012

- Part of POC Zine Project’s Race Riot! Mall at Death By Audio

Photo by Mimi Thi Nguyen


MEMORIES FROM THE EVENT

By Daniela

The venue was PACKED and at a certain point (about halfway through the show) we had to ask everyone who was sitting to stand up so that a horde of folks waiting in line outside could get in. Like all of our other tour stops, the door cover was sliding scale/pay what you can with no one turned away for lack of funds.

Although DBA had a cash bar, people kept it together and the energy overall was amazing. Around 9pm, after I had made sure the projector was working, we kicked things off.

 Jamie Varriale Vélez, our local guest reader, did an amazing job and was super brave (she read first). Race Riot! crew Osa, Anna Vo, Mimi Thi Nguyen and Cristy C. Road followed. I played MC, worked at the Race Riot! mall, dealt with problems as they came up and took some of the photos you see in this post.

We’re still getting tons of positive feedback for Aye Nako and Shady Hawkins, the two fierce bands that held down the second half of the evening.

Jordan Alam tabled on behalf of the Barnard Zine Library (longtime ally entity), sharing some of the POC and feminist zines available in their collection. Thanks, Jordan and Jenna Freedman! <3

BIG THANKS to Cristy C. Road for coordinating our finale event logistics, Death By Audio for allowing us to use the venue and all the DBA folks who handled sound and door needs.

I’m probably forgetting to thank a million people but we’ll get it together for the zine and art book that we’re doing for the tour. 

We’ll have more candids and quotes from tour members and attendees in the weeks to come.

Thanks again, you reading this right now, for your interest and support. This is an experiment in community and activism through materiality. If you took any photos or video of this event and are willing to share so we can add it to our documentation, please email daniela@dcapmedia.com. <3

***ANNOUNCEMENT***

If you’re interested in developing your digital media and community organizing skills by interning for POC Zine Project, email daniela@dcapmedia.com.

We can provide college credit or, if you’re not enrolled at an accredited university, professional mentorship. Meatspace internships will take place at DCAP Media HQ in NYC. Telecommuting/remote production internships are also available.

IMPORTANT THINGS

1) We’re doing a zine about this tour, so if you were part of any of the events, let us know if you want to contribute by emailing daniela@dcapmedia.com.

2) We’re doing a national conference in 2014. 

3) We’re doing a west coast tour in 2013.

4) If you want to be a part of any upcoming POCZP events, let us know.

5) We love you.

ABOUT POC ZINE PROJECT

POC Zine Project’s mission is to make zines by people of color easy to find, distribute and share - community and activism through materiality. We took the Race Riot! tour through 12 cities from Sept 24 - Oct 7, 2012.

STAY INFORMED

poczineproject.tumblr.com

facebook.com/poczineproject

twitter.com/poczineproject

All tour dates: http://bit.ly/PeEgaR

TOUR RECAPS ARCHIVE

Oct 7: Death By Audio - Brooklyn

Oct 6: University of Maryland + Brickhaus - College Park and Baltimore

Oct 5: St. Stephen & the Incarnation Episcopal Church - Washington, D.C.

Oct 4: University of Pittsburgh - Pittsburgh

Oct 3: Skylab - Columbus

Oct 2: Rachael’s Cafe - Bloomington

Oct 1: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign + UCIMC - Champaign

Sept 30: multikulti - Chicago

Sept 29: University of Michigan + 3rd Death Star - Ann Arbor

Sept 28: The Trumbullplex - Detroit

Sept 27: Ohio University + evening potluck with Cindy Crabb - Athens

Sept 26: Mr. Roboto Project - Pittsburgh

Sept 25: The Wooden Shoe - Philly

Sept 24: 538 Johnson - NYC - Brooklyn

Sept 14 - Wellesley College pre-Race Riot! tour panel

All photos should be credited to Daniela Capistrano/POC Zine Project unless otherwise noted. Please be sure to credit and link to poczineproject.tumblr.com if you reblog individual pics. Tx! <3