POC ZINE PROJECT

Posts tagged los angeles

Meet Cihuatl Ce: POCZP’s 2014 L.A. Zine Fest Tabler and Panelist (2 of 5)

POC Zine Project is tabling and hosting a panel discussion at the 2014 L.A. Zine Fest! Meet one of our five collaborators, Cihuatl Ce, founder of the Ovarian Psyco-Cycles Bicycle Brigade:

Cihuatl Ce (Founder, Ovarian Psyco-Cycles Bicycle Brigade in Los Angeles, CA)

[Photo credit: Steet Lenz Photography]

Cihuatl Ce (pronounced Seewhat Seh) has been spitting truth to power in the form of politically charged feminist inspired, urban indigenous hip-hop for the past decade.

Sharing the stage with underground hip hop heavies such as Dead Prez, Bambu, Broadcast Live, Olmeca, Invincible -to name a few- her high energy performances have won her dedicated support base across the globe. She currently tours in support of her latest album, FEMI9mm: The Fury of a Wombyn, released in early 2012.

POCZP NOTE: Cihuatl Ce will be doing a special live performance during our panel discussion at the 2014 L.A. Zine Fest! Stay tuned for more details.

Cihuatl’s reach is not confined solely to the lyrical realm of resistance. For the past 15 years she has been a fervent youth advocate and community organizer.

image

[Visit Cihuatl Ce at cihuatlce.comtwitter.com/CihuatlCe]

In 2010 she founded the first all womyn of color cycling collective Ovarian Psycos Bicycle Brigade and was the driving force behind landmark events such as LA’s first ever Clitoral Mass -attended by close to 300 womyn - as well as other initial rides addressing  the health disparities specific to womyn of color and at risk communities.

As a mother driven to reach young women with a message of hope, rebellion, and defiance against relics of tradition and patriarchy, Cihuatl Ce is committed to bringing consciousness beyond just the music, unapologetically creating change and leaving fans and casualties in her wake.

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BACKGROUND

POC Zine Project tabled at the 2013 L.A. Zine Fest and had a lot of fun. Read the recap here.

As part of our advocacy to support as many POC creators as possible, we’ve partnered with both new and past folks on this year’s events. POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano put out a call for new tabling and speaking partners for the 2014 L.A. Zine Fest, which resulted in our latest lineup. 

Cihuatl Ce hosted some 2013 #RaceRiotTour members during our California dates, which led to this latest collaboration.

MEET ALL OUR COLLABORATORS

Cihuatl Ce (Founder, Ovarian Psyco-Cycles Bicycle Brigade in Los Angeles, CA)

Ara Christina Jo (Rock Paper Scissors Collective in Oakland, CA)

Dail Chambers (Founder, Yeyo Arts collective in St. Louis, MO)

Nyky Gomez (Founder, Brown Recluse Zine Distro in Seattle, WA)

Tracey Brown (Community Organizer in New Orleans)

ABOUT 2014 L.A. ZINE FEST

L.A. Zine Fest is organized by a collective of zine-enthusiasts dedicated to promoting zine culture as a means to connect the pre-exisiting communities in L.A.–artistic or otherwise. They aim to create opportunities for people to share self-published works and host events that encourage ideas to spill out onto paper in pictures and words. They believe that by embracing the urge to create and sharing ideas there can be a more robust and formidable local zine community that extends beyond bookstores and bedrooms. L.A. Zine Fest is an opportunity for Southern California’s zinesters to come together en masse in order to meet and exchange ideas with those from all over the country.

Join us this year on February 16, 2014, when LAZF welcomes 175+ exhibitors of zines and small press publications to Helms Bakery as zinesters, comics creators and DIY publishers to come together to share their work with each other and with the public at large.

Helms Bakery District Parking Garage
(between La Dijonaise and Vitra)
8703 Washington Blvd.
Culver City, CA 90232

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2014. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to ongoing advocacy costs, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

We are rebooting our org structure and operations in 2014 and will be transparent about that process. Stay tuned.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

COMMUNITY SUBMISSION: Islam Book, a zine exploring Islamic identity 

TITLE: Islam Book
RELEASE: April 20, 2013
ORIGIN: Vancouver, Canada
AUTHOR: Paradise Xerxes Khanmalek
ABOUT ISLAM BOOK, BY PARADISE:

Islam Book is zine about voice, appropriation, and an assertion of a complex racial and sexual identity. With Islam Book, I am attempting to complicate the reader’s perception of what exactly an Islamic identity is in order to assert the inclusion of Queerness, weirdness, varying languages, and general humanity. 
I am also trying to reclaim middle eastern pattern and calligraphic aesthetic from the visual appropriation I observe in mainstream visual media. I have included a lot of poetry written with farsi letters that spell out english words that attempt to investigate my own Islamic queer identity and call to action other queer POC to engage in a critical dialogue about the body and internalized racism.

WHERE TO BUY: Email lillymalek@yahoo.com or follow hifrog.tumblr.com and submit your interest as a question. Paradise will take it from there!
POCZP will be offering a few copies of Islam Book at this year’s DC Zinefest.
ISLAM BOOK IS NOW IN THE POCZP ARCHIVE!
Paradise is one of many POC who have donated copies of their zines to the POC Zine Project archive. Donations are critical to our work, as we are a 100% volunteer organization and rely on direct donations to function outside the nonprofit industrial complex. We purchase zines directly from POC whenever we can, but donations are especially appreciated.
Click here for info on how to donate your zine to POCZP.
Here is Paradise’s donation statement for 14 copies of Islam Book:

My name is Paradise Xerxes Khanmalek. I’m submitting my zines to the POC Zine Project because making zines is one of the only mediums I have felt comfortable enough to challenge extremely pressing and personal racial issues. I have felt a dire need to engage with other POC about issues I find important, and the most successful way I have found is creating and distributing my own zines.

Hopefully by submitting Islam book and my other zines to the POC Zine Project, I can create a larger dialogue, engage in more discussion, and reach the eyes of more POC.
 
The POC zine project was really exciting to learn about because I feel a constant lack of support for POC in my community and my body and the POC Zine Project seems to be a real, active, force that challenges white power, and connects and strengthens people of color. 
 
I created the zine Islam Book as a blatant assertion of my own queer Muslim identity in order to complicate the perception of what it means to be muslim, Jewish, middle eastern, or queer. I also intend the book to reclaim middle eastern pattern aesthetic from the appropriation I feel present in media coming from white voices and associate the aesthetic with my own queer muslim voice.
 
I do these things by creating digital patterns from photos I took, writing poetry that mix the english and farsi language, and layering symbols to subvert stereotypical associations. Some of the poetry and patterns focus on the body; perceived middle eastern facial character traits, internalized racism, self-hate, and language I feel manifests from these phenomenon. I also focus on the body from a gender queer perspective.
 
I speak about queerness in farsi and call out for a general embrace of ugliness with regards to hetero normative white beauty standards prevalent in myself, my Iranian identity, my family, and the Iranian community surrounding me. I by no means aim to shame Iranian people who decide not to “embrace being ugly”, as I have put it, but rather express my own experience becoming critical with internalized racism and create a dialogue with people who might benefit from this discussion.
 
Many of the images in the digital patterns are of locations in Los Angeles, where I was born and raised. I find it important to remind the viewer that this discussion is happening within a context, I am experiencing these things within the immense colonial ideological presence of the united states.
 
I have a lot to say about this book, about Los Angeles, the united states, the appropriation of certain middle eastern visual arts aesthetic, and internalized racism with regards to the body and being queer.


POCZP always loves to hear how folks find out about us. Here’s Paradise’s story:

I’m really exited about what the POC Zine project does. I went to New Orleans [in early 2013] and bought a copy of Shotgun Seamstress from Maple St. Book store. I later googled the zine and it led me to the POC Zine Project.
I’ve made three different series of zines and Islam Book is my most racial and my favorite. I like the page where I wrote red hot chilli pepper lyrics out in Farsi. I printed around 20 copies so I could send it to you guys. 

——————-
SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT
If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.
DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

COMMUNITY SUBMISSION: Islam Book, a zine exploring Islamic identity 

Islam book (2013) by Paradise Xerxes Khanmalek

TITLE: Islam Book

RELEASE: April 20, 2013

ORIGIN: Vancouver, Canada

AUTHOR: Paradise Xerxes Khanmalek

ABOUT ISLAM BOOK, BY PARADISE:

Islam Book is zine about voice, appropriation, and an assertion of a complex racial and sexual identity. With Islam Book, I am attempting to complicate the reader’s perception of what exactly an Islamic identity is in order to assert the inclusion of Queerness, weirdness, varying languages, and general humanity.

I am also trying to reclaim middle eastern pattern and calligraphic aesthetic from the visual appropriation I observe in mainstream visual media. I have included a lot of poetry written with farsi letters that spell out english words that attempt to investigate my own Islamic queer identity and call to action other queer POC to engage in a critical dialogue about the body and internalized racism.

WHERE TO BUY: Email lillymalek@yahoo.com or follow hifrog.tumblr.com and submit your interest as a question. Paradise will take it from there!

POCZP will be offering a few copies of Islam Book at this year’s DC Zinefest.

ISLAM BOOK IS NOW IN THE POCZP ARCHIVE!

Paradise is one of many POC who have donated copies of their zines to the POC Zine Project archive. Donations are critical to our work, as we are a 100% volunteer organization and rely on direct donations to function outside the nonprofit industrial complex. We purchase zines directly from POC whenever we can, but donations are especially appreciated.

Click here for info on how to donate your zine to POCZP.

Here is Paradise’s donation statement for 14 copies of Islam Book:

My name is Paradise Xerxes Khanmalek. I’m submitting my zines to the POC Zine Project because making zines is one of the only mediums I have felt comfortable enough to challenge extremely pressing and personal racial issues. I have felt a dire need to engage with other POC about issues I find important, and the most successful way I have found is creating and distributing my own zines.
Hopefully by submitting Islam book and my other zines to the POC Zine Project, I can create a larger dialogue, engage in more discussion, and reach the eyes of more POC.
 
The POC zine project was really exciting to learn about because I feel a constant lack of support for POC in my community and my body and the POC Zine Project seems to be a real, active, force that challenges white power, and connects and strengthens people of color. 
 
I created the zine Islam Book as a blatant assertion of my own queer Muslim identity in order to complicate the perception of what it means to be muslim, Jewish, middle eastern, or queer. I also intend the book to reclaim middle eastern pattern aesthetic from the appropriation I feel present in media coming from white voices and associate the aesthetic with my own queer muslim voice.
 
I do these things by creating digital patterns from photos I took, writing poetry that mix the english and farsi language, and layering symbols to subvert stereotypical associations. Some of the poetry and patterns focus on the body; perceived middle eastern facial character traits, internalized racism, self-hate, and language I feel manifests from these phenomenon. I also focus on the body from a gender queer perspective.
 
I speak about queerness in farsi and call out for a general embrace of ugliness with regards to hetero normative white beauty standards prevalent in myself, my Iranian identity, my family, and the Iranian community surrounding me. I by no means aim to shame Iranian people who decide not to “embrace being ugly”, as I have put it, but rather express my own experience becoming critical with internalized racism and create a dialogue with people who might benefit from this discussion.
 
Many of the images in the digital patterns are of locations in Los Angeles, where I was born and raised. I find it important to remind the viewer that this discussion is happening within a context, I am experiencing these things within the immense colonial ideological presence of the united states.
 
I have a lot to say about this book, about Los Angeles, the united states, the appropriation of certain middle eastern visual arts aesthetic, and internalized racism with regards to the body and being queer.

POCZP always loves to hear how folks find out about us. Here’s Paradise’s story:

I’m really exited about what the POC Zine project does. I went to New Orleans [in early 2013] and bought a copy of Shotgun Seamstress from Maple St. Book store. I later googled the zine and it led me to the POC Zine Project.

I’ve made three different series of zines and Islam Book is my most racial and my favorite. I like the page where I wrote red hot chilli pepper lyrics out in Farsi. I printed around 20 copies so I could send it to you guys. 

——————-

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

Scene Report (POC Zine Project edition): L.A. Zine Fest 2013

Here are some moments from our first tabling and panel experience as invited guests at L.A. Zine Fest on February 17, 2013:

1. When we arrived at the Ukrainian Cultural Center and were impressed with the space

2013 L.A. Zine Fest exterior

2. L.A. collaborator Chula Doula posing with flowers before assisting us with POCZP tabling needs (Thanks, Pati!)

Chula Doula will be at our table today #lazinefest #poczines

Pati Garcia is a Certified Sexological bodyworker/Somatic Sex Educator, self-identifies as genderqueer/fluid two spirit of Peruvian-Mexican descent, loves to dig feet in the earth and throw love into the cosmos. Pati holds space for life unraveling and unwinding as a birth doula. Pati follows only the spirit led path and refuses to compromise pleasure for any reason at all. Radical feminist doula bodyworker, workshop facilitator. Wanna see your cervix?? Ask her how.

3. When Cristy C. Road, Suzy X, Chula Doula and Mariam Bastani all tabled together at the same time <3

Cristy C. Road, Suzy X, Chula Doula and Mariam Bastani tabling at #poczines table at #lazinefest 2013

Osa Atoe (Shotgun Seamstress) isn’t in this shot because she was reading during the Mend My Dress Press panel. Tomas Moniz (Rad Dad) was tabling elsewhere but joined us for the POCZP minutes after this photo was taken. POCZP founder Daniela was taking photos with her weird camera, which she will be replacing (sorry for the fuzz y’all).

Here is what Tomas had to say about his first experience collaborating with POCZP at an event:

Two and half hours is pushing it for a bad Hollywood movie; so when I realized the POC Zine Project workshop at this year’s L.A. Zine Fest lasted that long and the crowed remained attentive, invested, engaged throughout all six presentations, I was shocked.  But this fact demonstrates exactly how vital and important the event was!

I’ve attend and participated in many readings, but this one was special; this one was with people who have inspired me for years, Cristy C. Road and Mariam from MRR, as well as people who’s work is some of the best stuff out there today, Suzy X’s Malcriada and Osa Atoe’s Shotgun Seamstress; I also got the chance to thank the founder of the POC Zine Project organizer, Daniela, for keeping alive some of the zines that inspired me as I entered my own critical consciousness and keeping these important resources available for those who come after us.

4. Getting to know our tabling neighbors, such as Thi Bui and her son (who is also an artist!)

Meet our tabling neighbor Thi Bui and her son! thibui.com #poczines #lazinefest

Thi Bui was born in Saigon, raised in California and schooled in New York. She teaches high school and has a little boy and a husband. She have been hard at work, writing and drawing a graphic novel called THE BEST WE COULD DO. It is a 15-chapter immigration epic about her parents, their place in history, and her search for her place in her family.

5. When Mariam and other folks from Maximumrocknroll joined the POCZP table with more issues featuring punks and activists of color

POCZP founder @dcap and Mariam from MRR at #lazinefest #poczines

POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano (L) and Mariam Bastani (R)

Maximumrocknroll is a widely distributed monthly fanzine dedicated to supporting the underground punk rock scene. MRR’s 25-year plus history and large, obsessed all-volunteer staff has made its punk rock coverage the most consistently up-to-date and reliable around. Subscribe here or purchase individual issues here.

 

6. Quese IMC participating during our panel and speaking about #IdleNoMore (thanks again, Quese IMC! xoxoxo)

Quese IMC at the #poczines panel at #lazinefest discussing #idlenomore

Quese IMC had this to say immediately after the event:

I had a really good time. I enjoyed myself. Was good for me to see a different perspective and meet some cool people. Look forward to hearing from you and definitely keep me updated what you have in mind for the tour…

We are in the process of figuring out how Quese IMC can join us during the 2013 Race Riot! Tour to help share information about #IdleNoMore actions in the Canada, U.S., and around the world. Stay tuned for updates …

7. When our panel at the Moth Theatre quickly became over capacity, and we had to scramble to find additional seating/make space (all great problems to have!)

@shotgunseamstress Osa Atoe speaks during the #poczines panel at #lazinefest

 Osa Atoe reading at L.A. Zine Fest

Suzy X reading at #lazinefest #poczines photo by @raddadtomas Tomas Moniz

Suzy X reading at L.A. Zine Fest (C) while Osa (L) and Mariam (R) observe

This was Suzy’s second time reading as part of a POCZP event. Osa’s commentary afterward? “Suzy is hilarious.” We agree! Check out her latest zine, Malcriada. Suzy will also be joining us next month for Chicago Zine Fest, woo! <3

Here is what Suzy had to say about her time with POCZP at L.A. Zine Fest:

I was so honored to join the POC Zine Project last week at LA Zinefest! Our panel on Sunday afternoon brought up a lot of feelings for me, as the new girl in a scene of bad-ass POC in zines. It’s really mind-blowing how long it took for someone to finally initiate a project like this, a project that centers the voices of people of color in DIY publishing. I discussed my experience— a baby feminist living in a conservative household in the South, without access to any zines, much less zines by POC, until I attended college. And after hearing all these wonderful folks speak, I felt terribly late to the party, because they had been going at it for years! And doing a damn good job of it, too.

I’m incredibly thankful for the initiative Daniela has taken in bringing us all together. But in going forward, I think a conversation should happen in which we discuss access to those who don’t belong to punk scenes or those who don’t live in urban or densely-populated areas. This project was started to shed light on the history of POC in zines; but I am interested in working on ways to make this history available and accessible to more people. This could mean partnering up with existing distros or starting one by and for POC! Whatever works you know? And I’m excited to continue these conversations during the zine tour in Fall 2013.

Suzy X was delighted to find out after sending this recap that POCZP has been engaging in this conversation with folks for years. POCZP’s first zine partner, SlushPilePress, is located in a remote area of Eugene, Oregon (no longer operating) and our present zine distro partner is Brown Recluse Zine Distro. We also support zine partners who aren’t a part of our touring.

Our poverty zine partner Carey Fuller is based in Kent, WA, which is also an undeserved area. Our Legacy Series initiative (ongoing) is all about making independent publications by POC from decades past accessible. We don’t organize to center punk experiences, although we do have some collaborators who ID as punk. We have a lot going on <3.

COMMUNITY: If you are located in the midwest and/or rural areas without much support for independent publishers, email poczineproject@gmail.com we can discuss ways to partner. <3

Just some of the over capacity crowd at #poczines panel during #lazinefest 2013 <3

Just one section of our over capacity audience - it was so great to meet many of the attendees afterward!

Cristy C. Road speaks at #lazinefest during the #poczines panel

 Cristy C. Road reading at L.A. Zine Fest

8. Reconnecting with POCZP West Coast collaborators like Liz Mayorga

Pati aka Chula Doula (L.A.) and Liz Mayorga, zinester and artist (Bay Area) #lazinefest #poczines

Chula Doula (L) and Liz Mayorga (R) at dinner after L.A. Zine Fest

Liz  is a writer / illustrator from Southeast LA.  She grew up watching old, Black and White, Mexican films and selling burritos with her family.  The films were her inspiration.  The tacos and burritos paid for college.  She used to work with teenagers, and they taught her what it means to be brave.  Their energy and fearlessness inspired her to write and draw for herself, but she ends up creating for them too. 

Liz is now an MFA Writing Student at CCA, where she writes both fiction and nonfiction, milks the Illustration department for all they’re worth, and experiences an existential crisis every day.  Despite the hard work and many sleepless nights, she is extremely grateful to read, write, and draw. She thanks you for your support.

Liz is helping us with tour fundraiser events on the West Coast between now and October. If you’re interested in supporting POCZP West Coast initiatives, send us a message: poczineproject@gmail.com.

9. Helping more folks discover zines by people of color

#lazinefest 2013

We met so many rad people at L.A. Zine Fest and will be reaching out to everyone who signed our mailing list in the coming weeks. <3

10. Meeting (in person!) & collaborating with more inspiring zinesters of color like Tomas Moniz 

Tomas Moniz and Suzy X from #poczines POCZP at #lazinefest

Tomas Moniz (L) and Suzy X (R) at the POC Zine Project table at L.A. Zine Fest on February 17, 2013

Tomas Moniz is the founder, editor, and a writer for the award winning zine Rad Dad. Looking for radical parenting community, he created Rad Dad to provide the space for parents (particularly fathers) to share, commiserate and plan with each other, and to support each other in challenging patriarchy one diaper at a time. As China Martens has said, “Tomas has been the most vocal voice within zines, trying to start and keep a discussion within this aspect of radical politics and parenthood.” His writing has been included in many zines about parenting as well as in the books My Mother Wears Combat Boots and Don’t Leave Your Friends Behind.

This event marks the first time Tomas participated in a POCZP panel. We’re looking forward to connecting with him at Chicago Zine Fest next month and discussing ongoing collaborations!

A HUGE thank you to L.A. Zine Fest organizers Meredith Wallace and  Rhea Tepplim for all their help, as well as to everyone who volunteered at the fest. <3

Our panel was recorded and we are in the process of tracking down video so we can share it with you all.

COMMUNITY: Did we meet you in person at L.A. Zine Fest? Tell us about your experience exploring our tabling area or what you thought about our panel discussion. Submit your thoughts here or email poczineproject@gmail.com (all voices welcome, including white folks <3). 

We’ll update this recap with more reactions and photos from POCZP members and L.A. Zine Fest attendees in the coming days.

Scene Report: Spring 2013 Zine Events on the West Coast

POCZP Scene Report graphic: Spring 2013 West Coast Edition

By Itoro Udofia, Legacy Series Intern

The West Coast is bringing you some awesome zine events coming to L.A, Oakland, San Francisco, Portland and Oregon. If you find yourself on a search for zines that speak truth to power and written by ordinary people who create their own alternative press, then don’t miss out! Come out, get tips, make your own zine and learn more about creating these much needed spaces to have our voices heard.

Don’t miss out, bring a friend and get involved. We’ll see you there!

These events are just a sampling of what’s going on and represent zine events open to everyone. When information is provided, we will include accessibility details.

LOS ANGELES

Use Your Words!: A Reading with Tomas Moniz, Artnoose, Ariel Gore, Jillian Lauren & Jerry Stahl
Friday, February 15

Stories Books and Cafe
1716 West Sunset Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90026

7:30-9pm PST - FREE

Tomas will be part of POCZP’s panel at L.A. Zine Fest as well.

LA Zine Fest at the Ukranian Cultural Center
Sunday, February 17

The Ukrainian Cultural Center
4315 Melrose Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90029
11am - 5pm
PST - FREE

All workshops and discussions are FREE, however there is limited seating at the Moth, so if you really want to see something, be sure to get there early to snag a seat in time.

Multiple panels and other events are going down, including the following:

Anthologizing Your Zine with Mend My Dress Press
Mend My Dress Press’ workshop offering up some strategies to help you begin the process of anthologizing your zine, touching on everything from choosing content to suggestions for publishing. Get advice from the Press’ founders and authors in the flesh!

11:30 AM – 12:30 PM
@ The Moth Theatre

POC Zine Project presents: Beyond ‘Race Riot’: People of Color in Zines from 1990s-Today

Join POC Zine Project members Cristy C. Road, Osa Atoe, Mariam Bastani, Suzy X, Tomas Moniz and POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano as they reunite after the 2012 Race Riot! Tour at L.A. Zine Fest. POCZP members will present a multimedia reading and discussion, as well as answer questions about their experience traveling to 14 cities and six universities on the Race Riot! tour, strategies for building community, and more.

1:00 PM – 3:00 PM
@ The Moth Theatre

Check the schedule for specifics on other panels.

BAY AREA
 
Zine Reading with Mend My Dress Press at Needle & Pens
http://mendmydress.com/2013/01/09/were-goin-on-tour/
Wednesday, February 13
Needle & Pens,  7 PM

Zine Reading with Mend My Dress Press at The Holdout http://mendmydress.com/2013/01/09/were-goin-on-tour/
Thursday, February 14
The Holdout, 7:30 PM

MakeArt Workshop with DIY Rubber Band Books at Bayview Branch Library
Saturday, February 23
12:30 - 2:00PM
Drop-in, no registration required
Free and open to the public

Bayview Branch Library
5075 Third Street 
San Francisco, CA 94124

Learn this simple book-making technique using only two materials: paper and colorful rubber bands. Use your book as a journal, photo album, sticker book or planner!

DIY Zine Making Workshop at Rock Paper Scissors Collective
Thursday, February 28 Every 4th Thursday from 6-8pm Sliding scale cost $1-$10 questions -[at]- rpscollective -[dot]- org
2278 Telegraph ave., Oakland, CA 94612510.238.9171

Led by Price Cobbs who says “I am an office worker by trade, with an interest in the arts.  Like many, I have at times made unauthorized fliers and booklets on my employer’s copy machines. I am excited by the thought of using my office photocopy skills to produce a multi-page magazine.”

Zine Making Workshop at Makeshift Society
Wednesday, March 6
Makeshift Society 235 Gough St., San Francisco, CA 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM This event is $25-20 dollars, depending on your membership status.

Bookish Beasts at the Center for Sex and Culture Library and Archive
Sunday, April 14

8AM - 6PM PST

1349 Mission Street San Francisco, CA 94103

[Between 9th and 10th Streets, on the corner of Grace Street]

Zine & Comic Book Festival —details to come.

PORTLAND, OREGON

Annual Stumptown Comics at the Oregon Convention Center
Saturday and Sunday, April 27-28 Sat. 10-6, Sun. 12-6 

777 NE ML King Blvd.
Portland, OR 97232

Entering its tenth year as an organization, the annual Stumptown Comics Festival has been a staple of Portland, Oregon’s vibrant comics community that’s home to artist collective like Periscope Studios and Tranquility Base, along with publishers such as Dark Horse Comics, Top Shelf Productions, and Oni Press. Overseen by a board of professionals in the industry, Stumptown Comics, Inc. has progressed thanks to the valuable time of efforts of its volunteers.

WEST COAST CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

This isn’t technically a zine event but we wanted to share this anyway:

Humboldt State University (HSU) Asian Pacific Islander American Student Alliance’s (A.P.A.S.A) zine call for submissions!! APASA’s goal is to create a space for people who identify within pan-Asian Pacific Islander ethnicity at HSU to gather and find camaraderie. They also seek to form alliances with other groups and the local community in an effort to increase awareness and appreciation of the diversity that exists within their group and how we identify as Asian, Asian American, South Asian, and Pacific Islanders, & to work in solidarity to engage their differences.

Get your creative work or your local resource/business published in the A.P.A.S.A Pan-Asian Pacific Islander ZINE. A paper printed version will be published & distributed as part of the March Pan-API Perspectives festival.

February 20, 2013: Deadline to submit pieces for the paper version of the zine, to apasa@humboldt.edu

What is the “Pan-API Zine?

It is an online resource open to HSU students and the Humboldt County community at large to share stories, reflections, art, and poetry, which focus on experiences & perspectives of pan-Asian Pacific Islander ethnicity. The Pan-API Zine is a place to list and find different community resources, including local non-profits & businesses that offer services in relation to the pan-API perspective.

While this online Zine was created as part of the Pan-API Perspectives festival that will take place from March 25-30, 2013, it is also an ongoing and living resource for the community to share learnings and resources before the festival and after as well.

COMMUNITY: Did we miss any Spring 2013 West Coast zine events? Submit here and we’ll update this post.

Would you like to help us create Scene Reports for every state? Contact us: poczineproject@gmail.com.

If you would like to invite POC Zine Project to your upcoming event, or collaborate on a joint event, let us know!

Editor’s Note: Itoro will be creating weekly Scene Report roundups. Make sure to send us your zine event details so we can share! If it’s not zine-related but possibly of interest to zinesters of color, we will share that as well.

An important trend I’ve seen is that zines have become increasingly visual. Illustration, comics, photography—these were always present in the zine world, but in LA, it seems like they are sort of enjoying a uptick in attention. Zines used to be these super-personal, super-political publications. My favorites were ‘perzines’ that made you feel like you were reading somebody’s diary or a note you got passed in class. I don’t see a whole lot of these anymore, but maybe I’m just looking in the wrong places! In LA at least, there’s of course a rich history of punk zines like Flipside and Slash, but there was a big-time explosion and appreciation for zines and their potential for illustrators and comics in the Asian-American community, something that Giant Robot famously encapsulated. My best friend is Filipina and growing up, to see stuff like that—it was awesome, like looking into a secret world. That’s what zines were always about, and something that continues to this day.

Bianca Barragan on the historical arc of the LA zine scene

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Note from POC Zine Project:

Zine culture is not monolithic (well, it shouldn’t be). It’s important for those documenting the history of zines to factor in how geography, gender, race, class and various communities inform zine culture from one region to the next.