POC ZINE PROJECT

Posts tagged mixed race

COMMUNITY SUBMISSION: ‘Korea: The Queer Edition’

Korea: The Queer Edition (June 2013)

[DESCRIPTION: original cover of Korea: The Queer Edition]

TITLE: Korea: The Queer Edition 

AUTHOR: EstellaMiyuki Baker//Queer Scribe Productions

RELEASE: June 30, 2013 (6th zine in a series)

ORIGIN: Seoul, South Korea (author is presently based in Philadelphia, PA)

DESCRIPTION FROM MIYUKI: 

During my stay in Seoul, I participated in many ‘obvious’ gay activities but my goal was to meet as many different types of queer artists and activists inside and outside of the so-called Seoul gay scene, and highlight their varied and unique approaches and thoughts in doing LGBTQ activism in South Korea.  

Many queer Korean activists I spoke to were a part of labor rights and/or disability related movements, advocating strongly for intersectional work which emphasized ally-building and finding common causes. Larger LGBTQ organizations like Donginryun were member-supported, so rather than being subjeted to governmental or institutional demands that often accompany grant money, membership fees gave organizations more freedom and a democratic form of accountability.

The zine is filled with documentation of the many rallies and events I participated in as well as the art of queer Korean/expat artists.

READ NOW:  

HOW TO BUY:

Queer Scribe Productions has published eight zines so far. You can purchase them at the following link: https://www.etsy.com/shop/QueerScribe

Queer Scribe Productions is the result of Miyuki’s 14 month journey around the world to join the movement in creating a worldwide network of queer artists. 

ABOUT MIYUKI 

Miyuki is a resident of the place where circles overlap. As a queer, multi-racial/lingual female mixed-media artist, she is happiest when working with people who embrace intersectionality. After graduating from Swarthmore College in 2012, where she was involved in queer Asian activism and making art, she received the Watson Fellowship to travel the world in search of queer artists and activists and made 8 zines highlighting what she learned under her publishing house Queer Scribe Productions.

She is a freelance artist, journalist, barber, translator, seamstress, lecturer and performer. Visit The Queer Barbershop to get a rad haircut on the cheap. Contact her at heymiyuki (at) gmail (dot) com for further inquiries, project ideas and pricing.

estellamiyukibaker.com

heymiyuki.wordpress.com

twitter.com/miyukibaker

facebook.com/abcdefghijklmiyuki

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2014. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to ongoing advocacy costs, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

We are rebooted our org structure in 2014 and will be transparent about that process. Stay tuned.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

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Editor’s Note: Community Submission OR Call for Submissions post is usually from POC folk submitting their own zine or zine call to be featured by POCZP. If you would like to share your zine with the POC Zine Project community, here’s how to do it.

Please make sure to include pertinent info for CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: deadline, submission info/email/tumblr, related links, your own bio, etc.

As long as the zine was created/co-created by a person of color, we will always share Community Submissions. Enjoy!

POCZP also accepts anonymous submissions and zine donations from POC. Click here for submission guidelines.

ZINESTER SPOTLIGHT: Nia King, 2013 #RaceRiotTour Member

2013 #RaceRiotTour member Nia King

[DESCRIPTION: Nia King & her LOVE & ROCKETS shirt <3]

This isn’t the first time we’ve featured Nia King on POCZP’s digital platforms but it’s definitely one of the most exciting announcements so far: 

Nia’s joining the 2013 #RaceRiotTour caravan! Look out for her during the following dates/cities:

10/19/2013 - San Francisco, CA

10/21/2013 - Davis, CA

10/23/2013 - Portland, OR

10/25/2013 - Seattle, WA

Nia will be documenting the NorCal/Northwest leg of the tour through photography and video. She will also be selling two new zines on tour, one tentatively titled Ain’t No One Paying Your Ass to Be There: Words of Wisdom from Queer and Trans Artists of Color, and another called Art School is Hell. Her old zines will also be available, either through her, or through Brown Recluse Distro.

Here’s what Nia had to say about joining this year’s Race Riot! Tour experience: 

The POC Zine Project’s work is SO important! When I was growing up, it was really hard to find zines by people of color. Zines gave me a place to process what it meant to be mixed when I didn’t have a mixed community, and allowed me to connect with other writers from multiracial families like Shannon Perez-Darby (From Here to There and Back Again), Aidan Aberrant (Ataxia), and Claudia Leung (MOONROOT). Lauren Jade Martin’s zine Quantify was particularly influential in helping my understand myself as a mixed-queer person. 

As a largely unregulated and uncensored form of media, I think zines are a really powerful tool for self-expression and community-building in communities that are historically excluded from having their voices heard and their faces seen. Zines offer us the opportunity to “become the media,” which allows us to shape the way our stories are told, a crucial step in self-determination.

ABOUT NIA KING

Nia King is a queer mixed-race art activist from Boston, MA living in Oakland, CA. She is the author of zines such as Angry Black-White Girl, MXD: True Stories by Mixed-Race Writers, the Borderlands series, and The First 7-Inch Was Better: How I Became an Ex-Punk.

She is also the creator of the short film The Craigslist Chronicles, QTPOC Comics, and the podcastWe Want the Airwaves: QPOC Artists on the Rise. While much of her older work focuses on mixed-race identity, her new work focuses on the lives of queer and trans people of color and the power of art as a tool for social change.

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WANT MORE?

We will share more 2013 #RaceRiotTour member bios between now and our kickoff date, October 3, 2013 in NOLA. We have 19 confirmed touring members so far <3 Bookmark our #RaceRiotTour landing page, as we will update it with all bio links and other important information in the coming days.

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

ZINESTER SPOTLIGHT: Celina Williams, Zinester & Librarian in Virginia

Some of Celina Williams' zines: POC zinester and librarian in Richmond, VA

[DESCRIPTION: Some of Celina Williams’ own zines. Photo credit: Celina]

By Cata, POCZP East Coast Intern/Coordinator

Celina Williams is a zinester, a librarian of special collections and a Richmond Zine Fest organizer for 5+ years. You can visit Celina and a zine collection within the James Branch Cabell Library in Richmond, VA.

Check out Richmond Zine Fest, happening this year on October 5th! Find out more at richmondzinefest.org. Richmond Zine Fest has been going strong in Richmond, VA, since 2007.

From Celina:

Richmond Zine Fest registration for workshops and tablers is open… if you know of any folks who’d be available/interested to participate Saturday Oct. 5th, I’d be happy to answer any questions.

POCZP’S Q&A WITH CELINA

POCZP: How long have you been making zines?

CELINA: Consciously, for the past 6+ years. When I was a kid I would play around with the stapler and make little books—those are zines right!?

POCZP: Nice! What kind of zines do you make currently?

CELINA: I make poetry and photo zines. My latest issue is Mean Girls and it’s about being told I look mean because I don’t smile. So it got me thinking about the mean/nice binary. Also, being a black and Hispanic woman, I am used to people commenting about my demeanor and look, they often say “what are you?”

POCZP: Any ideas for future zines?

CELINA: Actually, yes!! A friend and I were walking and noticing how trees often have these beautiful designs that often look look like vaginas, so a collaboration zine soon to be made will be called In the Tree’s Vagina.

POCZP: Awesome. Man, I can think of a lot of trees that would be perfect for your zine haha! Switching gears a bit, why do you think making zines is important?

CELINA: Well, I am a librarian and I view zines as creating a kind of archive for yourself. I see zines like that. But it’s an archive that you share. For example my mom bought me a diary when I was younger; but it felt weird to write and not share.

POCZP: Wow!! I love that because it makes me think of one of my favorite quotes “an untold story is the greatest burden” by Alice Walker.

CELINA: Right! And self-publication in zines is cool because in academia there is this rigid way you have to be—and that just doesn’t exist in zines.

POCZP: Any other things your working on?

CELINA: Yes! I am reorganizing the zine collection at our library (yes we have a zine collection!) and after this interview I will be finding out a way to tag and measure POC representation in our collection.

POCZP: That’s awesome! Let POC Zine Project know if you need any support! Any last exciting things happening in your community?

CELINA: Thank-you! and yes…Shout out to Richmond Zine Fest Co-organizers!! Which I’ve been a part of for the past 5+ years. Also, it was just international zine month so don’t forget to check out new zines!!

POCZP: Thank you!

</end>

CONTACT CELINA

celinanicoledoes.tumblr.com

Twitter.com/celinanicole

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

ZINE SPOTLIGHT: ‘The First 7-inch Was Better: How I Became an Ex-Punk’ by Nia King (2008)

TITLE: The First 7-inch Was Better: How I Became an Ex-Punk (2008)

AUTHOR: Nia King

RELEASE: 2008

PAGES: 20

ORIGIN: Denver, CO

DESCRIPTION BY STRANGERDANGERZINES.COM:

Nia (Angry Black-White Girl and Borderlands) comes forward to declare her status as an ex-punk. She criticizes anarcho-punk and many activist scenes for its ignorance and the lack of inclusion of folks of color, women and queers. Nia refuses to leave a part of herself at the door in order to adjust to the whiteness and maleness of a musical scene that she once truly enjoyed. The zine also includes a pull-out portion in which you can take along to your next show in order to challenge yourself, your friends and other bystanders.

SOURCE: QZAP.ORG

Queer Zine Archive Project (QZAP) is responsible for scanning and making Nia’s zine file available online. POCZP helped to “liberate” this publication as an embeddable file for International Zine Month #IZM2013.

READ NOW (OR DOWNLOAD FOR FREE):

THE MAKING OF ‘THE FIRST 7-INCH WAS BETTER’

Excerpt from POZCP touring member Osa Atoe’s interview with Nia in 2009 for Maximumrocknroll:

Osa: Come on! You’re at a punk house right now hanging out with a girl that we both just randomly happen to know through punk… Just admit it you’re still kinda punk!
Nia: [laughs] BUSTED! Well, I don’t feel punk. I feel really alienated in punk spaces. Lo Mas Alla, where Luisa and some of my other friends live, feels kind of different. Most of the people who live there may still have love for punk culture, but they also view punk with a critical lens. At some point, most of them have told me they are growing out of punk. I could try and defend it further but it feels silly. I am staying with punks at a punk house. Fact. Am I a punk? No.
Osa: Yeah, well the point I’m trying to make is half-silly and half-serious. I do feel strongly about the fact that people of color end up relinquishing so much to white people just because white people take up all that space. I mean, how many times have you talked to another black girl who’s like, “I’m not a feminist because I feel like feminism is for white women”? And I’m thinking that feminism is an important tool, just like punk is for me, and I’m definitely not going to let white people define what it means to be punk or feminist. I’m going to use those words, those tools, in ways that benefit me.
Nia: I feel that, but defending punk and feminism can be a lot of work, and a lot of the criticism I’ve heard of both is valid. I guess trying to hold space for POCs in punk is exhausting, not because they’re not already there taking up (some) space, but because being the only POC in a room is fucking exhausting in my experience. I wanted to retreat to spaces where I didn’t feel like I had to fight for visibility or have to call people on their shit all the time, and for me punk was not that. Not that I was the lone voice of reason or the lone POC, but often enough, it felt like it. I have nothing but respect for women of color who hold it down in punk rock and call shit out, and make records and write zines, but it’s not for me anymore. Orat least I’m a lot pickier about the ways I engage with it and the situations I put myself in. You feel me?
Osa: Yeah I do. I think that’s why it’s so important to have this conversation because I can see how we’re coming at it from such different perspectives even though both are valid. I totally relate to feeling drained to the bone by being in predominantly white “progressive” spaces. And it wasn’t just punk. Going to college for women’s studies with all those well-meeting white liberal feminists almost gave me an aneurysm. At the same time, for me, it’s not about defending punk or feminism. I just am those things in my daily life. I feel like I did give up fighting for visibility and correcting ignorance and oppressive dynamics in punk scenes. But that just meant that I spent more time hanging out with the brown kids and cultivating those relationships.

Read Osa’s full interview with Nia here.

ABOUT NIA KING

Nia King is a queer art activist of color from Boston, Massachusetts. She currently resides in Oakland, California where she runs the podcast We Want the Airwaves: QPOC Artists on the Rise.

Nia King

artactivistnia.com

@artactivistnia

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

"I’m also really eager to see what People of Color (POC) Zine Project is bringing. They’re based out of the Bronx and do really important work in bringing non-whites to the forefront of zine communities. This is something that AZF Is highly lacking, and I really appreciate their presence this year."—Amanda Mills, co-founder and organizer of Atlanta Zine Fest

Source: clatl.com

Atlanta Zine Fest 2013

POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano will be tabling on behalf of POC Zine Project at the inaugural Atlanta Zine Fest on June 8 and 9. The table will feature a selection of POCZP zine partner titles, as well as some zines, art and jewelry by local ATL zinesters of color. <3

Be sure to stop by the POCZP table to purchase a fresh copy of Mixed Up! A zine about Mixed-Race Queer & Feminist Experience (you can read and download here for free as well), selections from Free Poet’s Press and be sure to get your issue of masConsumption before we run out of copies!

We’ll also have limited edition POCZP buttons for sale/trade! <3

Judith (see her latest call for submissions to Tom Girl zine here), a local POC zinester, will be tabling with POCZP in Atlanta.

Judith Jones is a writer, blogger, zinester and feminist. She contributes to the online magazine Inconnu and she blogs at Simple But Chic. She can be contacted at pigsthatfly.tumblr.com or simplebutchic247@gmail.com.

From Judith:
I will be bringing issue one and two of Tom Girl and artist trading cards. Also, I’ll bringing a few pieces of my dad’s jewelry to sell. It’s handmade. I’m  also bringing various button rings and earrings that I made by myself. 

POCZP will also be joined by Chantelle Kodua, an environmental enthusiast who enjoys working on various DIY projects in her spare time. When she isn’t out saving the world, by digging recyclables out of trash cans, she can be found spending copious hours on tumblr. She can be contacted at chantellephone.tumblr.com.

Daniela is attending Atlanta Zine Fest on behalf of POCZP to connect with the zine community and local zinesters/writers/publishers/artists of color in preparation for the POCZP tour date in Atlanta in October.

POCZP is sharing tabling space with local zinesters of color, as part of our advocacy to make zines by people of color easy to find, distribute and share.

If you are interested in collaborating with POCZP in Atlanta, contact poczineproject@gmail.com. We are especially interested in hearing from artists/zinesters/activists of color and white folks interested supporting POCZP’s efforts.

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

ZINE SPOTLIGHT: Mixed Up! A Zine about Mixed-Race Queer & Feminist Experience [READ & DOWNLOAD]

Mixed Up! A Zine about Mixed-Race Queer & Feminist Experience

POCZP helped support the call for submissions to Mixed Up! A zine about Mixed-Race Queer & Feminist Experience last fall. We’ll be distributing copies at Atlanta Zine Fest this weekend <3

AUTHORS: Zine editors Lil Lefkowitz, Lee Naught & Lior and contributors to “Mixed Up!”

TUMBLR: http://mrqfzine.tumblr.com/

PUBLISHED: April 24, 2013

NOTE FROM LIOR TO POCZP:

Thanks so much for your email, and for uploading Mixed Up to your Issuu.  We’d love it if you made the zine available in whatever way you feel like! So totally feel free to post the printable, so folx can make and distribute their own. And, of course, if you wanna make copies and sell them, by all means!

READ ‘MIXED UP!’ NOW

POCZP’s mission is to make zines by people of color easy to find, distribute and share. In that spirit, we’ve added a readable version online that you can also download, courtesy of the “Mixed Up!” editors.

ORIGINAL ‘MIXED UP!’ CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Hey, mixed-race folks, how do you respond when you get asked what you are? Do you feel at a loss for words when trying to describe your racial, ethnic, or cultural background? Do you find yourself struggling to understand where you belong in the context of prominent racial paradigms? Do you run into a POC-white binary that is reductive, incomplete, or simply not enough? What does it mean that there often isn’t an easy answer? And what happens when you add gender, feminism, and queerness into the mix?

Hey, queers and feminists, let’s respond to the lack of representation of mixed-race folks like us.  Yes, we are deeply indebted to the countless beautiful queers and feminists of color who have demanded to be heard; who fight, survive, and die on a daily basis. We are indebted to colonized people and feminists of color around the world and in the states who have taught us that black and brown are beautiful; who have shown us how to act with compassion and love and thoughtful rage in the face of white supremacist violence. This zine is a call to continue this work; to build upon the work of anti-racist and decolonial literature, given the nuances of our lives as mixed-race queers and feminists, so often living on stolen land while refusing to forget the land stolen from our ancestors.

No doubt, racism against folks of color is fucking real, and those of us who are mixed race and sometimes or always pass as white are much less prone to the multiple forms of violence faced by black and brown folks. However, too often, that’s the end of the conversation. This zine strives to challenge the narrow conception of POC vs white, a binary which doesn’t allow space for many folks’ experiences or for more complex identities (even among POCs and white folks).

As mixed-raced queers and feminists, we refuse to whitewash our histories. We refuse to label individuals based solely upon our perceptions of their skin color or features. Colonialism attempts to whitewash, erase, assimilate and subjugate through violence and oppression.  We refuse to finish this work. We invite you to collectively participate in this refusal.

A Working Definition of Mixed-race: While this may not be the perfect term, we are using it to frame a very broad set of experiences and identities, which may include tracing all or part of one’s culture or heritage to brown people and colonized people, inclusive of all skin tones. This may also include being raised with multiple cultures or with immigrant experience.

Why Queers & Feminists? Not only are we interested in the ways that mixed-race folks’ identities interact with queerness and feminism, but we also believe that it is important to prioritize stories from queers and feminists, whose voices are often marginalized. Moreover, with a topic as broad as race, we want to anchor our discussions in some common politics. This anchor is important because it is a big part of how we (the editors) choose who to organize with, live with, form community with, fuck, and, in this case, write zines with.

Possible Topics: Privilege. [Not] Passing. Sex, relationships & dating. Conflicting and conflated identities (especially related to race and queerness, transness, feminism, class, dis/ability). The POC/white binary. Cultural appropriation. Structural and institutional oppression. Art, music & creativity. [Not] Belonging. Cultural estrangement. Immigrant experiences. Families & histories. Colonizing processes in family, work, activisms & relationships. Being too brown/not brown enough. Home. Diaspora. Performing identities. Physical manifestations of race, and intersection with other forms of identity and presentation. Preserving and paying respect to heritage & history (eg: interviews, oral histories, folklore). RememberingTracing origins and roots. The importance of race/ethnicity/culture to political formation. Mixed-race community. Food & recipes. Remedies. Developing new language(s). Race/religion overlap (and exclusion). And much, much more.

Media and formats: Poetry, prose, essay, visuals (B&W for zine, possibly color online), audio (for online), interviews, and other formats (pitch them to us!— we’re good catchers).

Deadline for submissions: Extended to January 15th, 2012.  Submit to mrqfzine [at] gmail [dot] com.

Contact:
mrqfzine [at] gmail [dot] com
www.mrqfzine.tumblr.com

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HELP DISTRIBUTE ‘MIXED! UP’ ZINE

Download a read-only and a PRINT version here, courtesy of the ‘Mixed Up!’ zine editors.

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

SPOTTED: POC Zine Project&#8217;s East Coast intern Cata in the South Bronx, preparing for D.C. Zine Fest!
Today Cata dropped by POCZP HQ in the South BX to pick up inventory for tabling at this year&#8217;s D.C. Zine Fest!
Be sure to support the fest and drop by our table, where Cata will have her own zines, as well as a selection of issues from our zine partners. Get a free poster and button and learn more about POC Zine Project!
D.C. ZINE FEST INFO
The 2012 DC Zinefest will be held on July 28th at St. Stephens Church (1525 Newton St. NW) from 11 am to 5&#160;pm. This event is free and open to the public.
Check out the Facebook invite for more information.
Photo description: POC Zine Project&#8217;s east coast intern Cata stands in front of a refrigerator at POCZP HQ in the South Bronx. She is holding POCZP founder Daniela&#8217;s latest mini-zine, &#8220;Cat Genie.&#8221; Cata is making a fierce face,revealing excitement. Behind her on the fridge is a poster from POCZP&#8217;s tour last year, as well as a poster from Midwest Zine Fest, where POCZP midwest coordinator Joyce Hatton was in attendance.
Photo by Daniela Capistrano
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DO YOU WANT TO SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT?
We are looking for representatives in every state, as well as regional  support, as we build toward the National POC Zinester &amp; Ally Conference/Convergence. Ideally you have some experience with organizing events and building community, but experience is not required. All are welcome. Priority will be given to people of color who apply but allies are definitely welcome.
Contact poczineproject@gmail.com for more details with “regional coordinator and internship info” as the subject line.
If you are outside the U.S. and want to be a part of our emerging POCZP Global Ambassadors program, email poczineproject@gmail.com as well to stay informed as opportunities arise.
SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT
If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.
DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

SPOTTED: POC Zine Project’s East Coast intern Cata in the South Bronx, preparing for D.C. Zine Fest!

Today Cata dropped by POCZP HQ in the South BX to pick up inventory for tabling at this year’s D.C. Zine Fest!

Be sure to support the fest and drop by our table, where Cata will have her own zines, as well as a selection of issues from our zine partners. Get a free poster and button and learn more about POC Zine Project!

D.C. ZINE FEST INFO

The 2012 DC Zinefest will be held on July 28th at St. Stephens Church (1525 Newton St. NW) from 11 am to 5 pm. This event is free and open to the public.

Check out the Facebook invite for more information.

Photo description: POC Zine Project’s east coast intern Cata stands in front of a refrigerator at POCZP HQ in the South Bronx. She is holding POCZP founder Daniela’s latest mini-zine, “Cat Genie.” Cata is making a fierce face,revealing excitement. Behind her on the fridge is a poster from POCZP’s tour last year, as well as a poster from Midwest Zine Fest, where POCZP midwest coordinator Joyce Hatton was in attendance.

Photo by Daniela Capistrano

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DO YOU WANT TO SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT?

We are looking for representatives in every state, as well as regional  support, as we build toward the National POC Zinester & Ally Conference/Convergence. Ideally you have some experience with organizing events and building community, but experience is not required. All are welcome. Priority will be given to people of color who apply but allies are definitely welcome.

Contact poczineproject@gmail.com for more details with “regional coordinator and internship info” as the subject line.

If you are outside the U.S. and want to be a part of our emerging POCZP Global Ambassadors program, email poczineproject@gmail.com as well to stay informed as opportunities arise.

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

MEET POCZP’s FIRST EAST COAST INTERN: Cata!
Part of POC Zine Project’s advocacy is empowering new and seasoned zinesters of color in the U.S. (and soon worldwide) to share their stories while supporting other POC. Cata is the first East Coast Intern for POCZP—we are excited to share developments as this part of our experiment in activism and community through materiality unfolds. 
CATA, IN HER OWN WORDS
Cata is a mixed race two-spirit/many spirit writer/yogi/graphic novel reader/zine lover in Washington, D.C. originally from the LBC (Long Beach, CA). She teaches swimming to youngsters, yoga to queers in DC.  When she&#8217;s not doing that she is organizing in her community or reading and writing about graphic novels in her blog and tumblr. You can find her here: 
http://agraphiclens.wordpress.com/
http://uchueca.tumblr.com/
She also writes mini plays for youth and adults, but you won&#8217;t find those on the internet—you have to come out and experience one for yourself! 
Here&#8217;s what Cata had to say about POC Zine Project and why it&#8217;s important to her:

POCZP provides a space for zinesters of color to find one another and one another&#8217;s media. This exchange is also documentation. Documenting/archiving the history of POC communities is necessary, beautiful and will give fruit to even more magical and creative future generations. This is a community engine! I am honored to offer my contributions here.

Some mediums that have grown her love fierce are: The Queer God by Marcella Althaus-Reid, Don&#8217;t Leave Your Friends Behind- by Victoria Law and China Martens, the rhythms of Chavela Vargas, the art of Laya Monarez and the story telling abilities of James Baldwin, Gloria Anzaldúa, Craig Thompson, Zora Neale Hurston, Marjane Satrapi, Little Crow and the elders in her world.
She is constantly working to live whole in a conflicted world and love well the complicated people in the world. Keep on, move strong and hustle till it&#8217;s done.
"Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing will change if it is not faced" - James Baldwin
If you missed it, here are some poc zine reviews Cata did for POCZP a while back.
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DO YOU WANT TO SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT?
We are looking for representatives in every state, as well as regional  support, as we build toward the National POC Zinester &amp; Ally Conference/Convergence. Ideally you have some experience with organizing events and building community, but experience is not required. All are welcome. Priority will be given to people of color who apply but allies are definitely welcome.
Contact poczineproject@gmail.com for more details with “regional coordinator and internship info” as the subject line.
If you are outside the U.S. and want to be a part of our emerging POCZP Global Ambassadors program, email poczineproject@gmail.com as well to stay informed as opportunities arise.
SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT
If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.
DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

MEET POCZP’s FIRST EAST COAST INTERN: Cata!

Part of POC Zine Project’s advocacy is empowering new and seasoned zinesters of color in the U.S. (and soon worldwide) to share their stories while supporting other POC. Cata is the first East Coast Intern for POCZP—we are excited to share developments as this part of our experiment in activism and community through materiality unfolds. 

CATA, IN HER OWN WORDS

Cata is a mixed race two-spirit/many spirit writer/yogi/graphic novel reader/zine lover in Washington, D.C. originally from the LBC (Long Beach, CA). She teaches swimming to youngsters, yoga to queers in DC.  When she’s not doing that she is organizing in her community or reading and writing about graphic novels in her blog and tumblr. You can find her here: 

http://agraphiclens.wordpress.com/

http://uchueca.tumblr.com/

She also writes mini plays for youth and adults, but you won’t find those on the internet—you have to come out and experience one for yourself! 

Here’s what Cata had to say about POC Zine Project and why it’s important to her:

POCZP provides a space for zinesters of color to find one another and one another’s media. This exchange is also documentation. Documenting/archiving the history of POC communities is necessary, beautiful and will give fruit to even more magical and creative future generations. This is a community engine! I am honored to offer my contributions here.

Some mediums that have grown her love fierce are: The Queer God by Marcella Althaus-Reid, Don’t Leave Your Friends Behind- by Victoria Law and China Martens, the rhythms of Chavela Vargas, the art of Laya Monarez and the story telling abilities of James Baldwin, Gloria Anzaldúa, Craig Thompson, Zora Neale Hurston, Marjane SatrapiLittle Crow and the elders in her world.

She is constantly working to live whole in a conflicted world and love well the complicated people in the world. Keep on, move strong and hustle till it’s done.

"Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing will change if it is not faced" - James Baldwin

If you missed it, here are some poc zine reviews Cata did for POCZP a while back.

———

DO YOU WANT TO SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT?

We are looking for representatives in every state, as well as regional  support, as we build toward the National POC Zinester & Ally Conference/Convergence. Ideally you have some experience with organizing events and building community, but experience is not required. All are welcome. Priority will be given to people of color who apply but allies are definitely welcome.

Contact poczineproject@gmail.com for more details with “regional coordinator and internship info” as the subject line.

If you are outside the U.S. and want to be a part of our emerging POCZP Global Ambassadors program, email poczineproject@gmail.com as well to stay informed as opportunities arise.

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

COMMUNITY SUBMISSION: Mixed Girl Zine
ZINE NAME: Mixed Girl Zine
CREATOR: Sister Bell Zines
RELEASE: September 5, 2012
ORIGIN: Curated in Sydney, Australia. The submissions are from worldwide. 
BUY NOW (Vol.1 &amp; 2): http://sisterbellzines.bigcartel.com/
DESCRIPTION: &#8221;It’s a collection of art, poetry, writings (including personal and essays) about the complicated and often contradictory experiences of being a mixed-race  girl. Submissions were open to any girl who identifies as mixed, biracial, and/or multiracial. 
It created a space where people understood each other as girls and as mixed race, which is something rare when being mixed race means you are often an outsider in most situations.&#8221;
SAY HI: sister-bell.tumblr.com 
COMMUNITY: If you are looking for more zines about being biracial/mixed-race, you can&#8217;t go wrong by exploring Nia King&#8217;s many zines &lt;3
&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;-
Editor’s Note: A Community Submission post results from POC folk submitting their own zine or zine call to be featured on the POC Zine Project Tumblr and other digital platforms. If you would like to share your zine with the POC Zine Project community, here’s how to do it.
When you submit, feel free to add some background, a description of your work and art and your mission statement. If you just send us the name of your zine, we’ll simply link back to a source for purchasing it and use the language you already have on your site.
As long as the zine was created/co-created by a person of color, we will always share Community Submissions. Enjoy!
POCZP accepts anonymous submissions and zine donations from POC. Click here for submission guidelines.

COMMUNITY SUBMISSION: Mixed Girl Zine

ZINE NAME: Mixed Girl Zine

CREATOR: Sister Bell Zines

RELEASE: September 5, 2012

ORIGIN: Curated in Sydney, Australia. The submissions are from worldwide. 

BUY NOW (Vol.1 & 2): http://sisterbellzines.bigcartel.com/

DESCRIPTION: ”It’s a collection of art, poetry, writings (including personal and essays) about the complicated and often contradictory experiences of being a mixed-race  girl. Submissions were open to any girl who identifies as mixed, biracial, and/or multiracial. 

It created a space where people understood each other as girls and as mixed race, which is something rare when being mixed race means you are often an outsider in most situations.”

SAY HI: sister-bell.tumblr.com 

COMMUNITY: If you are looking for more zines about being biracial/mixed-race, you can’t go wrong by exploring Nia King’s many zines <3

———-

Editor’s Note: A Community Submission post results from POC folk submitting their own zine or zine call to be featured on the POC Zine Project Tumblr and other digital platforms. If you would like to share your zine with the POC Zine Project community, here’s how to do it.

When you submit, feel free to add some background, a description of your work and art and your mission statement. If you just send us the name of your zine, we’ll simply link back to a source for purchasing it and use the language you already have on your site.

As long as the zine was created/co-created by a person of color, we will always share Community Submissions. Enjoy!

POCZP accepts anonymous submissions and zine donations from POC. Click here for submission guidelines.

ZINESTER SPOTLIGHT: Nia King
POC Zine Project founder Daniela Capistrano met Nia in person - for the first time - on November 9, while working in San Francisco. It was fortuitous, because just a week or two prior, Daniela ordered Nia&#8217;s back catalogue of zines for the POC Zine Project archive directly from Nia.
Nia and Daniela had a great conversation about the historical context of zines by POC, the role of POC Zine Project and materiality as a catalyst for activism and building community. Some of this discussion will appear in an interview for Colorlines.com in the coming weeks.
Here are excepts from the letter that Nia mailed Daniela with the zine order:

&#8230;I am working on something for the Mixed-Race Queer Feminist zine. I also submitted a revised/improved version of &#8220;The First 7-Inch Was Better&#8221; for the &#8220;Punk Anterior&#8221; issue of Women and Performance: a Journal of Feminist Theory. It should be coming out any day now.
&#8230;I just wanted to say that I really respect the work you are doing, and I wish there had been a resource like POC Zine Project when I was a young zinester.

We &lt;3 you, Nia! Thanks for everything that you do. We look forward to collaborating with you on the 2013 Southwest/West Coast Race Riot! Tour!
ABOUT NIA
Nia King is a mixed-race artist, activist, writer, and filmmaker from Boston, MA who is proud to call Oakland home. She currently writes for Colorlines.com, a national racial justice news website.
Before joining Colorlines, Nia worked to improve the quality of life of queer and transgender students of color at Mills College by organizing a number of educational, political, and social events for the campus community.
Before moving to Oakland, Nia served as a Grassroots Fundraising Specialist and Crisis Hotline Volunteer at the Colorado Anti-Violence Program, a nonprofit which works to end violence within and against Colorado&#8217;s LGBTQ communities.
In addition to her nonprofit work, Nia has spend the last five years self-publishing, presenting at conferences, and screening her film, &#8220;The Craigslist Chronicles.&#8221; Her writing has been published in Zine Yearbook 9, Race Revolt Magazine, and the book Zines in Third Space: Radical Cooperation and Borderlands Rhetoric. More of her writing is soon to be published in Women and Performance: A Journal of Feminist Theory.
Nia has presented her undergraduate research project, &#8220;Mangos with Chili: Life-Sustaining Performance Art for and by Queer and Transgender People of Color,&#8221; at Stanford University, UC Riverside, and the University of Arizona. Her most recent project, a short comedic film about apartment hunting in Oakland, premiered at the 2012 National Queer Arts Festival in San Francisco, and recently had its international premiere at the Trans Film Screening Series at the University of Toronto&#8217;s Center for Women &amp; Trans People.
You can contact Nia directly at niaking@zoho.com.
COMMUNITY: You can access many of Nia&#8217;s zines for free on QZAP.org, as well as order them from Stranger Danger Distro. Here&#8217;s a taste:
The 7-Inch was Better: How I Became and Ex-Punk (online at QZAP)

“Nia (Angry Black-White Girl and Borderlands) comes forward to declare her status as an ex-punk. She criticizes anarcho-punk and many activist scenes for its ignorance and the lack of inclusion of folks of color, women and queers. Nia refuses to leave a part of herself at the door in order to adjust to the whiteness and maleness of a musical scene that she once truly enjoyed. The zine also includes a pull-out portion in which you can take along to your next show in order to challenge yourself, your friends and other bystanders.” - quoted from StrangerDangerDistro.com

ZINESTER SPOTLIGHT: Nia King

POC Zine Project founder Daniela Capistrano met Nia in person - for the first time - on November 9, while working in San Francisco. It was fortuitous, because just a week or two prior, Daniela ordered Nia’s back catalogue of zines for the POC Zine Project archive directly from Nia.

Nia and Daniela had a great conversation about the historical context of zines by POC, the role of POC Zine Project and materiality as a catalyst for activism and building community. Some of this discussion will appear in an interview for Colorlines.com in the coming weeks.

Here are excepts from the letter that Nia mailed Daniela with the zine order:

…I am working on something for the Mixed-Race Queer Feminist zine. I also submitted a revised/improved version of “The First 7-Inch Was Better” for the “Punk Anterior” issue of Women and Performance: a Journal of Feminist Theory. It should be coming out any day now.

…I just wanted to say that I really respect the work you are doing, and I wish there had been a resource like POC Zine Project when I was a young zinester.

We <3 you, Nia! Thanks for everything that you do. We look forward to collaborating with you on the 2013 Southwest/West Coast Race Riot! Tour!

ABOUT NIA

Nia King is a mixed-race artist, activist, writer, and filmmaker from Boston, MA who is proud to call Oakland home. She currently writes for Colorlines.com, a national racial justice news website.

Before joining Colorlines, Nia worked to improve the quality of life of queer and transgender students of color at Mills College by organizing a number of educational, political, and social events for the campus community.

Before moving to Oakland, Nia served as a Grassroots Fundraising Specialist and Crisis Hotline Volunteer at the Colorado Anti-Violence Program, a nonprofit which works to end violence within and against Colorado’s LGBTQ communities.

In addition to her nonprofit work, Nia has spend the last five years self-publishing, presenting at conferences, and screening her film, “The Craigslist Chronicles.” Her writing has been published in Zine Yearbook 9, Race Revolt Magazine, and the book Zines in Third Space: Radical Cooperation and Borderlands Rhetoric. More of her writing is soon to be published in Women and Performance: A Journal of Feminist Theory.

Nia has presented her undergraduate research project, “Mangos with Chili: Life-Sustaining Performance Art for and by Queer and Transgender People of Color,” at Stanford University, UC Riverside, and the University of Arizona. Her most recent project, a short comedic film about apartment hunting in Oakland, premiered at the 2012 National Queer Arts Festival in San Francisco, and recently had its international premiere at the Trans Film Screening Series at the University of Toronto’s Center for Women & Trans People.

You can contact Nia directly at niaking@zoho.com.

COMMUNITY: You can access many of Nia’s zines for free on QZAP.org, as well as order them from Stranger Danger Distro. Here’s a taste:

The 7-Inch was Better: How I Became and Ex-Punk (online at QZAP)

“Nia (Angry Black-White Girl and Borderlands) comes forward to declare her status as an ex-punk. She criticizes anarcho-punk and many activist scenes for its ignorance and the lack of inclusion of folks of color, women and queers. Nia refuses to leave a part of herself at the door in order to adjust to the whiteness and maleness of a musical scene that she once truly enjoyed. The zine also includes a pull-out portion in which you can take along to your next show in order to challenge yourself, your friends and other bystanders.” - quoted from StrangerDangerDistro.com