POC ZINE PROJECT

Posts tagged nyc

COMMUNITY SUBMISSION: BDGRMMR Zine

BDGRMMR founders recently contacted us to let us know that their sixth issue, titled EXECUTION, is available to read online.

TITLE: BDGRMMR

AUTHOR(S): Yulan Grant, Justin Allen and Brandon Owens

RELEASE: Summer 2013/Winter 2014

ORIGIN: New York, NY

DESCRIPTION: “BDGRMMR is a zine about and by queer artists of color. We’re both a zine and artist collective creating both tangible and digital records of QPOC culture in NYC.

EXECUTION evokes energy, desire and purpose, three themes that are prevalent throughout the narratives of both artists Jay Boogie & Tigga Calore.”

TUMBLR: bdgrmmr.tumblr.com

READ NOW:

Taking its name from assumptions and stereotypes of inarticulacy surrounding Black English and culture, BDGRMMR (pronounced Bad Grammar) is a zine, platform and collective of and for queer artists of color to document and discuss their work on their own terms, with their own language and in relation to their own culture. 

BDGRMMR was started in the summer of 2012 by Yulan Grant, Justin Allen and Brandon Owens.

GET MORE: issuu.com/badgrammar | BDGRMMR@gmail.com

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2014. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to ongoing advocacy costs, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

We are rebooted our org structure in 2014 and will be transparent about that process. Stay tuned.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

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Editor’s Note: Community Submission OR Call for Submissions post is usually from POC folk submitting their own zine or zine call to be featured by POCZP. If you would like to share your zine with the POC Zine Project community, here’s how to do it.

Please make sure to include pertinent info for CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: deadline, submission info/email/tumblr, related links, your own bio, etc.

As long as the zine was created/co-created by a person of color, we will always share Community Submissions. Enjoy!

POCZP also accepts anonymous submissions and zine donations from POC. Click here for submission guidelines.

ZINE SPOTLIGHT: ‘Tourist Art’ takes on Haitian art, tourism, border relations, commercialization and the global art market

tourist art

TITLE: Tourist Art

CREATORS: Gabrielle Civil and Vladimir Cybil Charlier

Gabrielle Civil is a black woman poet, conceptual and performance artist originally from Detroit, MI. A catalogue of her work “In & Out of Place: Black Feminist Performance Art in Mexico” was announced for fall 2012. She teaches at St. Catherine University in St. Paul, MN. The aim of her work is to open up space.

Vladimir Cybil Charlier explores the construction of visual language and identity from the perspective of a Haitian-American who has lived in and between cultures. In 2007, she and her husband André Juste represented Haiti at the Venice Biennale. She lives and works in Harlem and Philmont, New York.

RELEASE: October 2012 through CreateSpace

BUY NOW on Amazon for $9.06

DESCRIPTION BY THE AUTHORS:

Combining original poetry, drawings and watercolors, Tourist Art addresses Haitian art, tourism, border relations, commercialization, and the global art market. Created by two Haitian diasporic artists, the book highlights multiple ironies: how Haitian tourist art is produced in Haiti, a place with virtually no tourists; how it is the shadow of a rich, Haitian fine art tradition collected around the world; and, how Haitian tourist souvenirs are exported and sold in high volume, largely outside of Haiti itself. “tourist art is always selling time. wood carvings, figurines, postcards of sans souci. in santo domingo, viejo san juan, nassau, brooklyn, miami, detroit, in holes in the wall. tourist art by haitians doesn’t need haitians at all.”

Carefully designed, each page of the book offers iconic, Haitian images (market women with baskets, vodou spirits, historical figures), juxtaposed with pop images of globalization (tour guide badges, McDonald’s French fries, a do-not-enter sign.) Ultimately, the poem reveals how Haitian art receives more mobility and access than Haitian people. “take the art tour. to jacmel air stream to boston donkey hoof to port-au-prince shark raft to montreal cracked foot to cap haitïen tap tap to brooklyn aux cayes dark limousine visa to miami shot to croix-des-bouquets return tracery of tourist art itinerary en route.”

Exploring cultural authenticity and commerce, Tourist Art is the only fine artist book in the Haitian diaspora to tackle high and low culture in art. Its production through print-on-demand technology underlines this concept. The book’s rich language and dazzling illustrations are overall a stunning achievement.

POCZP REVIEWS TOURIST ART

By Chaun Webster, POCZP Midwest Coordinator

What an explosion of the senses in Gabrielle Civil and Vladimir Cybil Charlier’s Tourist Art. Its serene water color paintings are juxtaposed by the sometimes clean, sometimes spiraling yet always piercing text addressing the relationship between the mobility of Haiti’s artistic production and the stinging immobility of Haiti’s people.  

I found myself dizzy by the power of the questions being raised, “haitians walking in place, waiting to travel to the money embrace, standing still, omnipresent, erased. ourist art as static market place.”

At the heart I hear this book howling for space, psychic and material, for a transgression of borders, for where do oppressed peoples find reprieve when the markets consume everything?  Our cultures, which are a means of mapping freedom, of carving out more terrain for struggle, are so important to the vitality of our resistance.  

What happens then when they are bound to an insatiable market which speaks only in the vocabulary of “more.” That “more” a violence which Civil and Charlier turn on its head as they employ the making of an object.  

Seemingly odd in that it is the objects of Haiti’s artistic production that are being so fetishized by way of the silenced inhumanities of the conditions endured. This object though takes form at the intersection of a mirror and a hammer to make known the invisibilities, and build a room for another discourse, creative and treacherous. Read this and be read by it!  

Here is treacherous discourse, here is trickster tale wrapped in fine art as it mocks it, here is a poetics that doesn’t cover but sharpen the blade!!

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COMMUNITY: Do you want to review zines for POCZP? Learn more about POCZP internship & volunteer opportunities here. We are still accepting applications. 

If you are interested in POCZP leading a workshop or other event in collaboration with your organization - worldwide - email poczineproject@gmail.com.

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

ZINE EVENT [NYC]: 2/8/13 Punk Rock Karaoke Benefit for ABC No Rio Zine Library!

Punk Rock Karaoke is a DIY, fund-raising event that benefits a different community group each time.

This time around, they will be raising money for the ABC No Rio Zine LibraryThe ABC No Rio Zine Library contains over twelve thousand publications.

If you can’t make this event in person, donate what you can here.

EVENT DETAILS

Friday, Feb 8th
8pm-midnight
Sliding Scale: $5 — $20

Beverages will be sold. Along with zines!
Support your local zine library! 

Featuring songs from:
Against Me!, Bikini Kill, Black Flag, Bratmobile, Buzzcocks, Choking Victim, The Clash, Circle Jerks, Crass, Dead Kennedys, Descendents, Devo, Flogging Molly, Fugazi, Gogol Bordello, Gorilla Biscuits, Jawbreaker, Joy Division, Minor Threat, The Misfits, NOFX, Operation Ivy, Pixies, The Pogues, Ramones, Rancid, Screeching Weasel, Sex Pistols, Sleater-Kinney, The Smiths, The Specials, Stiff Little Fingers, Wire, X, X-Ray Spex + More!!!

Like them on Facebook to stay up to date on future events:
www.facebook.com/PunkRockKaraokeNortheast

Editor’s Note: Big thanks to Victoria Law for telling us about this event. Check her out in this clip  below:

COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT: Mimi Thi Nguyen, Golnar Nikpour and more at ‘Punk Anteriors’ event TONIGHT

POC Zine Project tabling at Jan. 31, 2013 event

We know some of you are bummed that this rad event is 1) far away from you and 2) 21+. We hear ya. Sometimes it seems like all the cool shit is in NYC, right? But that’s just not the case. We know from our travels that people are doing amazing things all over the world, including in small towns.

But this amazing thing is actually going down in NYC tonight, so if you can make it, show some love and stop by our table and For The Birds Collective’s! POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano will be there in solidarity with Mimi and the other readers, along with our Chief Fanalyst Julia B. and Race Riot! tour vet Cristy C. Road.

We’ve been thinking about all the people who can’t afford to purchase Women & Performance’s “Punk Anteriors” special double issue (it’s $85) or attend tonight’s event, so we’ve snagged a copy and made it available to read online, zine-style. <3

We’re also going to live-tweet when we can from @poczineproject using the hashtag #PunkAnteriors. Look for our tweets! <3

“Punk Anteriors: Theory, Genealogy, Performance” is issue 22.2-3 of Women & Performance: a journal of feminist theory and was co-edited by Beth Stinson and Fiona I.B. Ngô.

The issue emphasizes punk feminist spaces and times by bringing them to the forefront to forge and generate “punk anteriors.” We use the word “anteriors” in the title of this issue to think through the included articles that specifically address punk spaces and remnants—plotting what might come before, or anterior to, the telling of punk’s stories in two senses. First, punk anteriors point to the temporal, interrogating punk’s (always seemingly) resistant genealogy and questioning the source of politics and performances for punk. Second, we mobilize punk anteriors in the material and spatial sense of place, bodies, and archives. That is to say, we re-consider the context for the everyday performances of punk as occurring within atmospheres of imperial design; racial, feminist, and anarchist social movements; and immigration, poverty, and dislocation. 

Along with the hope of re-centering people of color in punk’s narratives, part of the goal with this issue has been to expand the places where we find valuable knowledge and aesthetics, to re-imagine who counts as an intellectual producer in punk’s history, and to work across genres.  Though the process was not always perfect, we have found this track productive and insightful, and hope that this model might inspire others to explore these topics and others in similar and even more brilliant ways.

COMMUNITY: After reading “Punk Anteriors,” let us know what you think! Click here to submit your review of excerpts of the journal or the entire publication.

EVENT DETAILS

Big thanks to tonight’s organizers for creating punkanteriors.tumblr.com/ and making this roundtable discussion as accessible as possible to the general public.

We also want to give an especially BIG thank you to this issue’s co-editors Beth Stinson and Fiona I.B. Ngô <3 Thank you for disrupting problematic facets of academia in your own ways.

Women & Performance’s “Punk Anteriors” special double issue release party

Thursday, January 31, 2013
@ The Gallery at Le Poisson Rouge
on Bleeker St b/n Thompson and Sullivan

6pm doors // 6:30pm start // 21+ // bands first

Aye Nako, Mon Mecs, and a roundtable discussion panel w/ Tavia Nyong’o, Mimi Nguyen, José Muñoz, Golnar Nikpour, M.J. Zilla, and the co-editors.

Also, zine tabling by the POC Zine Project and for the birds collective.

FREE!

For more venue information, please visit:
http://www.lepoissonrouge.com/lpr_events/women-performances-punk-anteriors-double-issue-release-party-jan-31st-2013/

RSVP on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/events/178101808980490/?fref=ts

BIOS

Aye Nako

http://ayenako.org/

Mon Mecs

See M.J. Zilla below

José Muñoz

Muñoz is Professor of Performance Studies at New York University, where he writes, researches and teaches Comparative Ethnic Studies, Queer Theory, Marxism, and Performance Art. His books include Disidentifications: Queers of Color and the Performance of Politics (Minnesota, 1999) and Cruising Utopia: the Then and There of Queer Futurity (NYU Press, 2009). Muñoz has published articles on punk, art, queer theory, critical ethnic studies, poetry, and performance art in venues such as Women & Performance: A Journal of Feminist TheoryGLQSocial TextTheatre JournalThe South Atlantic QuarterlyAmerican Quarterly, and Criticism.

Mimi Nguyen

Nguyen is Associate Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies and Asian American Studies at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Her first book, called The Gift of Freedom: War, Debt, and Other Refugee Passages, focuses on the promise of “giving” freedom concurrent and contingent with waging war and its afterlife (Duke, 2012). She is also co-editor with Thuy Linh Nguyen Tu of Alien Encounters: Popular Culture in Asian America (Duke, 2007), and co-editor with Fiona I.B. Ngo and Mariam Lam of a special issue of positions on Southeast Asians in diaspora (Winter 2012). She publishes also on queer subcultures, the politics of fashion, and punk feminisms. She is the author of Slander and Evolution of a Race Riot zines and has contributed her writing to Punk Planet and Maximum Rocknroll. In 2012, she went on a couple POC Zine Project/Race Riot! Tours to discuss and read from zines by people of color.

http://mimithinguyen.com/

Golnar Nikpour

G. S. Nikpour served as co-coordinator of Maximum Rocknroll — the longest running DIY punk fanzine in the world — from 2004-2007. She is also a founding editor ofB|ta’arof, a magazine featuring art, historiography, and cultural critique related to Iran and its diaspora. She was born in Tehran, Iran and lives in NYC where she still writes for MRR, plays drums in a hardcore band called In School, and is a PhD candidate researching Iranian political modernity at Columbia University.

Interview

Tavia Nyong’o

Nyong’o is Associate Professor of Performance Studies at New York University, where he writes, researches and teaches critical black studies, queer studies, cultural theory, and cultural history. His first book, The Amalgamation Waltz: Race, Performance, and the Ruses of Memory (Minnesota, 2009), won the Errol Hill Award for best book in African American theatre and performance studies. Nyong’o has published articles on punk, disco, viral media, the African diaspora, film, and performance art in venues such as Radical History ReviewCriticismTDR: The Journal of Performance StudiesWomen & Performance: A Journal of Feminist Theory,Women’s Studies QuarterlyThe Nation, and n+1. He is co-editor of the journal Social Text.

http://nyongo.wordpress.com/

M.J. Zilla (aka Mec Jagger)

Former co-producer/songwriter/front woman for The Slack Republic. A visionary extraordinaire she launched her own boutique music label, wynott records (former Rxlngr) in 2007 and has since managed artists such as Muhsinah, Jneiro Jarel & 00Genesis and consulted other acts like J*Davey, Viktor Duplaix & Dante Fried Chicken. While she continues to expand her brand designing YNA, her product line which debuted at the 2012 Afro-Punk festival, M.J. is quietly writing, producing and recording the debut solo release of her new indie-rock outfit, “Mon Mecs” with plans to also release a several rap songs early this year under the moniker “Mec Jagger.”

http://mecjagger.com

POC Zine Project

COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT: [NYC] A FREE symposium to discuss how to end global sexualized violence THIS FRIDAY 1/25/13
DATE: January 25, 2013
TIME: 8:30 am to 5:00&#160;pm EST
LOCATION: Columbia University Medical Center Bard Hall 50 Haven Avenue
REGISTER: here.
Contact Info: For further information regarding this event, please contact Gerald Govia by sending email to gg2431@mail.cumc.columbia.edu or by calling 2123424542.
***pre-registration is required to attend***
EVENT DETAILS
New York—The Women’s Media Center and Columbia University&#8217;s Mailman School of Public Health on Friday are sponsoring a free symposium to discuss how to end global sexualized violence.
“Global sexualized violence: From epidemiology to action” will bring together scientists, journalists, and policy makers. Robin Morgan, co-founder of the Women’s Media Center, will give the plenary address. Lauren Wolfe, director of WMC’s Women Under Siege project, will moderate two of the sessions. The project has been a leader in bringing attention to sexualized violence against women in war-torn areas.
Speakers will include award-winning journalist Maria Hinojosa;Cristina Finch, director of the women&#8217;s human rights program at Amnesty International USA; Cara Hoffman, author of the critically acclaimed So Much Pretty; and representatives from the Centers for Disease Control, the Peace Corps, and Physicians for Human Rights, among other organizations.
The symposium is one of a series of sessions hosted by Columbia University’s Epidemiology Scientific Symposia (CUESS) to look closely at epidemiology and population health.Pre-registration is required.
More details are available at CUESS.org.
The Women&#8217;s Media Center works to make women and girls visible and powerful in the media through strategic programs aimed at transforming the media landscape including media training, media monitoring and activism, original media content, media reports, and media programs and initiatives. The organization was founded in 2005 by Jane Fonda, Robin Morgan, and Gloria Steinem.
CONTACT: Cristal Williams Chancellor, Media Relations Manager, cristal@womensmediacenter.com or 202-587-1636.
&#8212;&#8212;-
Point of awareness: womenundersiegeproject.org

COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT: [NYC] A FREE symposium to discuss how to end global sexualized violence THIS FRIDAY 1/25/13

DATE: January 25, 2013

TIME: 8:30 am to 5:00 pm EST

LOCATION: Columbia University Medical Center Bard Hall 50 Haven Avenue

REGISTER: here.

Contact Info: For further information regarding this event, please contact Gerald Govia by sending email to gg2431@mail.cumc.columbia.edu or by calling 2123424542.

***pre-registration is required to attend***

EVENT DETAILS

New York—The Women’s Media Center and Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health on Friday are sponsoring a free symposium to discuss how to end global sexualized violence.

“Global sexualized violence: From epidemiology to action” will bring together scientists, journalists, and policy makers. Robin Morgan, co-founder of the Women’s Media Center, will give the plenary address. Lauren Wolfe, director of WMC’s Women Under Siege project, will moderate two of the sessions. The project has been a leader in bringing attention to sexualized violence against women in war-torn areas.

Speakers will include award-winning journalist Maria Hinojosa;Cristina Finch, director of the women’s human rights program at Amnesty International USA; Cara Hoffman, author of the critically acclaimed So Much Pretty; and representatives from the Centers for Disease Control, the Peace Corps, and Physicians for Human Rights, among other organizations.

The symposium is one of a series of sessions hosted by Columbia University’s Epidemiology Scientific Symposia (CUESS) to look closely at epidemiology and population health.Pre-registration is required.

More details are available at CUESS.org.

The Women’s Media Center works to make women and girls visible and powerful in the media through strategic programs aimed at transforming the media landscape including media training, media monitoring and activism, original media content, media reports, and media programs and initiatives. The organization was founded in 2005 by Jane Fonda, Robin Morgan, and Gloria Steinem.

CONTACT: Cristal Williams Chancellor, Media Relations Manager, cristal@womensmediacenter.com or 202-587-1636.

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Point of awareness: womenundersiegeproject.org

Intern with POC Zine Project in 2013!

POC Zine Project is looking for energetic and self-driven individuals to support the Legacy Series in 2013 through research, writing, event coordinating, web editing and social media support.

Telecommuting and in-person opportunities are available. 

Legacy Series internship experiences will be tailored to each individual’s strengths and experiences.

We are currently accepting applications for the Spring 2013 Internship Session, which runs from January 7 – April 26, 2013.

Early applications are highly recommended since the selection process is on a rolling basis. You do not have to be enrolled at a school to intern with POCZP.

Select interns in 2013 will have the opportunity to participate in the 2013 Southwest/West Coast Race Riot! tour, on the road with Daniela and the rest of the touring crew.

Click here for more details.

POCZP does NOT discriminate against any applicant on the basis of age, color, disability, gender, national origin, race, religion, sexual orientation, veteran status, or any classification protected by federal, state, or local law.

COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT: ‘The Black Panthers Worldwide Revisited’ event Nov 30 in NYC!

Black Panther Party event Nov 30 in NYC

Institute of African American Affairs at NYU presents:

The Black Panthers Worldwide Revisited

An international symposium on the influence of the revolutionary and liberation movement of Black Panthers in the 1960s/1970s in the USA

Friday, November 30th, 2012 / 6:00 pm

Free and Open to the Public

DETAILS

This roundtable reunion of Panthers from America, India, Israel, UK, and Australia will primarily be focused on the experiences of the members of their respective movements.

The participants will explain why they formed a Panther Party, what was their inspiration, what were they rebelling against, what were they up against in their respective countries, and how did they hear about and create a bound of solidarity with the US Black Panthers.

The idea is to provide students, scholars and the general audience with an opportunity to be exposed to an international oral history, archives, and memories that are not widely known and associated with the history of the Black Panthers in America. Additionally, the roundtable will also explore the links between the struggle for justice then and now.

LOCATION: Tishman Auditorium , Vanderbilt Hall (first floor)

New York University School of Law

40 Washington Square South, NY, NY 10012

Panel 1) 6:00—8:00 pm

The Panthers Worldwide Reunited

Moderator: Gerald Horne (USA)

Participants: Kathleen Cleaver (USA), Zainab Abbas (UK), P. K. Murthy (India), Nissim Mossek (Israel), Reuven Abergel (Israel), Marlene Cummins (Australia)

Panel 2) 8:00—9:30 pm

The Relevance of Revolutions Today

Moderator: Robin D. G. Kelley (USA)

Participants: Malia Lazu (USA), Abdoulaye Niang (Senegal)

For more information: http://africanastudies.as.nyu.edu/object/iaaa.black.panthers.worldwide

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Point of awareness: APOC-NYC listserv

SIGNAL BOOST: Picture the Homeless press conference in NYC, TOMORROW 11/16

From Picture the Homeless:

Since Hurricane Sandy, we’ve seen the best of New York on display: people coming together to help their neighbors out, volunteering time and food and money and clothes and manual labor, and collectively creating solutions to our problems.

Today, President Obama is visiting Staten Island to announce a new relief package. Earlier this week, Governor Cuomo announced his intent to ask the federal government for $30 billion in recovery aid. And Mayor Bloomberg has vowed to find housing for the 40,000 people made homeless by Hurricane Sandy.
 
But what about the almost 60,000 who were homeless beforehand? 46,000 living in city shelters, thousands on the streets, thousands more locked up or aging out of foster care or sleeping on the floors of friends and family.
 
Last year, Picture the Homeless found enough housing in vacant property for 199,000 people.

This is data that the city does not have - because they refuse to count vacant property.

We’re happy to share our data with the city - but only if they agree to a recovery plan that includes prevailing-wage jobs and very-low-income housing for folks who were housing-and-employment-challenged BEFORE the storm.

We need your help to make them do the right thing.


If the political will to adopt bold solutions and house 40,000 people made homeless by the storm exists, we are confident that these solutions can also help the people who were homeless before the storm. But so far, all we’re seeing is more of the same old story: the poorest and most vulnerable New Yorkers get the least out of the deal.

According to today’s Daily News, the Feds “are hiring an army of private contractors to do basic repairs” - will those be union jobs? Will low-income people get them, and will they pay a decent wage?

Please join us tomorrow morning, Friday. November 16th at 9:30AM, 116 West 129th Street (between Lenox & Adam Clayton Powell)

City officials and bureaucrats might be in charge of how all that money gets spent, but we run this city. After the storm, small community-based organizations like our heroes CAAAV and FUREE were leading the fight… while the Red Cross, who has raised well over $90 million since the storm hit, has been calling those same groups for guidance (Red Cross workers have even been calling Picture the Homeless because they’re so baffled by how the city’s shelter bureaucracy works). Members of Occupy Sandy have been training FEMA workers and the National Guard… and feeding them too!

This is our city. We have the knowledge and the power to make sure the city leverages storm relief wisely, benefiting all New Yorkers and building us up stronger than we were before.

Please join us tomorrow morning, in Harlem, outside a row of vacant city-owned property on 129th Street, as a way to highlight how the city’s not effectively using the resources it already has.

REBUILD STRONGER RALLY AND PRESS CONFERENCE
Friday. November 16th at 9:30AM
116 West 129th Street
(between Lenox & Adam Clayton Powell)

Call Sam at 646-314-6423 or email sam@picturethehomeless.org with any questions!

PS: Check out this new article about NYC’s recovery efforts, which says “While the city has made noises about a “shortage” of vacant apartments to house the displaced, the scarcity has nothing to do with a lack of space.A recent survey by Picture the Homeless found that New York City currently has more than 3,500 vacant buildings, enough to house nearly 72,000 people as well as enough vacant lots that if developed could house another 128,000.”

POC Zine Project founder Daniela Capistrano will be at this press conference tomorrow, in solidarity with Picture the Homeless.

For more information about POCZP and Carey Fuller’s upcoming zine series by and for people living at or below the poverty line, and how you can help with production and distribution, click here.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: A Zine about Mixed-Race Queer & Feminist Experience

Hi y’all,

Lior, Lil, and Lee at Bluestockings in NYC are working on a new zine about mixed-race queer and feminist experience. Here is their call for submissions:

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS A Zine about Mixed-Race Queer & Feminist Experience

Deadline: December 15th, 2012

Hey, mixed-race folks, how do you respond when you get asked what you are? Do you feel at a loss for words when trying to describe your racial, ethnic, or cultural background? Do you find yourself struggling to understand where you belong in the context of prominent racial paradigms? Do you run into a POC-white binary that is reductive, incomplete, or simply not enough? What does it mean that there often isn’t an easy answer? And what happens when you add gender, feminism, and queerness into the mix?

Hey, queers and feminists, let’s respond to the lack of representation of mixed-race folks like us. Yes, we are deeply indebted to the countless beautiful queers and feminists of color who have demanded to be heard; who fight, survive, and die on a daily basis. We are indebted to colonized people and feminists of color around the world and in the states who have taught us that black and brown are beautiful; who have shown us how to act with compassion and love and thoughtful rage in the face of white supremacist violence.

This zine is a call to continue this work; to build upon the work of anti-racist and decolonial literature, given the nuances of our lives as mixed-race queers and feminists, so often living on stolen land while refusing to forget the land stolen from our ancestors.

No doubt, racism against folks of color is fucking real, and those of us who are mixed race and sometimes or always pass as white are much less prone to the multiple forms of violence faced by black and brown folks. However, too often, that’s the end of the conversation.

This zine strives to challenge the narrow conception of POC vs white, a binary which doesn’t allow space for many folks’ experiences or for more complex identities (even among POCs and white folks).

As mixed-raced queers and feminists, we refuse to whitewash our histories.

We refuse to label individuals based solely upon our perceptions of their skin color or features. Colonialism attempts to whitewash, erase, assimilate and subjugate through violence and oppression.

We refuse to finish this work. We invite you to collectively participate in this refusal.

A Working Definition of Mixed-race

While this may not be the perfect term, we are using it to frame a very broad set of experiences and identities, which may include tracing all or part of one’s culture or heritage to brown people and colonized people, inclusive of all skin tones. This may also include being raised with multiple cultures or with immigrant experience.

Why Queers & Feminists?

Not only are we interested in the ways that mixed-race folks’ identities interact with queerness and feminism, but we also believe that it is important to prioritize stories from queers and feminists, whose voices are often marginalized.

Moreover, with a topic as broad as race, we want to anchor our discussions in some common politics. This anchor is important because it is a big part of how we (the editors) choose who to organize with, live with, form community with, fuck, and, in this case, write zines with.

Possible Topics

Privilege. [Not] Passing. Sex, relationships & dating. Conflicting and conflated identities (especially related to race and queerness, transness, feminism, class, dis/ability). The POC/white binary. Cultural appropriation. Structural and institutional oppression. Art, music & creativity. [Not] Belonging. Cultural estrangement. Immigrant experiences. Families & histories. Colonizing processes in family, work, activisms & relationships. Being too brown/not brown enough. Home. Diaspora. Performing identities. Physical manifestations of race, and intersection with other forms of identity and presentation. Preserving and paying respect to heritage & history (eg: interviews, oral histories, folklore). Remembering. Tracing origins and roots. The importance of race/ethnicity/culture to political formation. Mixed-race community. Food & recipes. Remedies. Developing new language(s). Race/religion overlap (and exclusion). And much, much more.

Media and formats

Poetry, prose, essay, visuals (B&W for zine, possibly color online), audio (for online), interviews, and other formats (pitch them to us!— we’re good catchers).

Deadline for submissions

December 15th, 2012.

Submit to  mrqfzine@gmail.com.

Contact:  mrqfzine@gmail.com www.mrqfzine.tumblr.com (See tumblr for information on the editors.)

You can also follow the making of this zine on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mrqfzine

About the Editors

Lee Naught is a radical, genderqueer, homo, chican@ organizer who has participated in a variety of collective, feminist, and sexuality-based projects. They grew up in confusing, undulating, and ultimately class-privileged environments; raised on one side by their Mexican mom, tía, grandma, and older sister in SoCal, with additional parenting on the other side by their gringo dad and sometimes by step-moms, too. These days they also get to share family space with their queer collective home in Brooklyn, NY. Lee spends most of their time working as a collective member at Bluestockings Bookstore, in addition to sex educating with Fuckin’ (A) (also known as the NY Radical Sex Positivity Project). Lee plays drums in a queer cuddlecore band, and enjoys bikes, politically rowdy queers, cooking vegan enchiladas for a friendly crowd, watching too much Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and pretty much anything that involves excessive glitter. Through this zine, Lee hopes to do some learning from other folks whose histories contain both colonization and race privilege, and folks thinking about the ways that queerness and gender non-conformity impact their relationship with their ethnicity.

Lior is a homo-queer musician, jewish-moroccan radical educator, interested in collectively cultivating the fierce political power of brown love and loving brown; which he learned about from Audre Lorde, his Ima and abuelita. Most recently, Lior was teaching a poetry class to high-school sophomores that focused on works by queers and women of color. Over summer, he played guitar in the downtown musical The Material World. And currently, he is an advocate-counselor at a high school in Brooklyn. Lior is hoping for lots of submissions from other brown and arab jews who are making the connections between apartheid, zionism and mizrahi struggles; who are telling their stories and the stories of their families: from the violence of assimilation/immigration, to being complicit in zionist colonization, to the love bubbling so patiently in grandmother’s kitchen. Lior plays guitar in the post-punk-dance band Gay Panic and the cuddle-core band Kitty and The Fags. He is also behind the acoustic project Music Was My First Gay Lover.

Lil Lefkowitz is a mixed-race, queer, second generation, latina with a passion for feminisms that create space for a myriad of complex identities, orientations, and experiences (read: a tica with attitude). Lil’s endeavors in new york city have been varied distinct and include being an Upward Bound creative writing instructor, a community supported agriculture project organizer, and a nonprofit worker at a women’s foundation. Lil recently graduated with a degree in women gender studies, sociology, and queer studies and now works as a community support worker with developmentally disabled adults. It is Lil’s hope that the MRQF zine will incite a discussion about the many nuances that comprise mixed-race queer folks’ identities specifically within the diasporic experience.

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PLEASE SIGNAL BOOST

We’ll definitely be adding this zine to the archive once it’s complete <3

- POC Zine Project

COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT: SouLar Bliss' List of Radical Self-Care and Community-Care Zine Resources

Here’s are just a few zines listed in this amazing roundup of resources:

  • Mindful Occupation: Rising Up Without Burning Out
    This booklet focuses on radical mental health, the #occupy movement, and mental and emotional support for people in action/protest/occupation situations.
  • Supporting a Survivor of Sexual Assault
    An incredible zine for folks who are supporting survivors! created by UBUNTU. UBUNTU is a Durham-based movement, led by women of color and survivors of sexual assault, dedicated to creating a world without sexual violence. We are transforming the pain and rage of lived and relived victimization in our community into healing, connection, and leadership by embodying and demanding democratic community accountability, and creative social change. A sustaining, transformative love is the center of our work and the model of our movement.
  • An Activists Guide To First Aid by Black Cross First AID Health Collective
    “We believe that health care is political. The kind of care we do or don’t receive, where and how we receive, that care, who provides that care, who has access to training to provide care, and what kinds of trainings are smiled or frowned upon, all involve inherently political issues. We believe the system needs to be changed…the health care system right along with others. We’ve put this zine together mostly to go along with a first aid training. While doing the trainings we realized there was way more to say about first aid than we would have time to say it in. So we thought a little reading would maybe be helpful to y’all”
  • Path to Intimacy 1: Finding & Sharing Yourself in the Context of Your Relationships & Path to Intimacy 2: Conflict Resolution in the Context of Your Relations
    This zine explores how to connect with ourselves and our partners intentionally and authentically and how to deal with conflicts within relationships.

To get the full list, visit soularbliss.com. Each of the zines are downloadable and free <3

About SouLar Bliss creator, Adaku Utah:

Adaku Utah is an activist, healer, teacher and performance artist committed to nurturing authentic expression within people and transformative and healing community spaces.

She is a proud social justice co-consirator, committed love warrior and ever-evolving mover and shaker.

She is the founder of SouLar Bliss (www.soularbliss.com), a collective space to share, create, discuss recipes, remedies, rituals and resources to healing ourselves and communities whole.

Adaku has worked as the Social Change Initiatives Coordinator at the Illinois Caucus for Adolescent Health (ICAH), where she led ICAH in planning and implementing youth-adult partnership practices and coordinated state-wide sex education school board organizing initiatives.

She has also worked with Depaul University at the Center for Interreligious Engagement to organize events that promote mutual understanding between individuals and communities of different religions and with the Women and Gender Studies department to co-chair planning of Creating Solidarity, a conference designed to explore coalition building and consciousness across race, class, gender, and sexuality.

She currently works with Project SAFE as a project facilitator, training and supporting youth and adults in educating and organizing around sexual health and reproductive justice issues.

She is a recent recipient of the 2012 Sexuality Leadership Development Fellowship with the Africa Regional Sexuality Resource Centre in Lagos, Nigeria and is also a recent recipient of the Center for Whole Communities 2012 Whole Thinking Fellowship Award and a Featured Nominee for Girl Tank and MTV Voices 2012 10,000 Names in 100 Days.

She has been awarded the Chicago Foundation for Women’s Jessica Eve Patt Award, spending a year working with the foundation to organize capacity building programs for grantees and coordinate executive director roundtables.

Adaku has facilitated and co-chaired planning and implementation of numerous workshops, curriculums and conferences, including BE Change, Action Out Loud, The Revolution Starts With Me, Sustaining Ourselves; Sustaining Our Communities and Transformative Justice teach-in.

She has also performed and presented at numerous conferences including, Let’s Talk About Sex, Education for Liberation, and From Abortion Rights to Social Justice.

Adaku has served as Board Member of the Women and Girls Collective Action Network, the Founding Steering committee member and board member of the Chicago Freedom School, founding member of Females United for Action, Advocates for Youth‘s Young Women of Color Leadership council member, New Leaders Networking Initiative member and Sistersong NYC member Her social justice work is coupled with her inspiring performance art.

Her artistry is inspired by love, constructive rage, storytellers, acts of resistance, healing, nature, Nigeria and bridge building. She has performed at numerous venues nationally and internationally, including the Oprah Show, The American Dance Festival, Dance Theatre Workshop, Harlem Stage, FuseBox Festival, APAP conference, Arsht Center, Taste of Chicago and shared the stage with the likes of Black Eyed Peas, Oprah, Ne-yo, Meshell Ndegeocello.

She currently dances and teaches with award winning, critically acclaimed DecaDance Theatre…and collaborates with Faye Driscoll’s Modern Dance Group, Organic Magnetics, Motion Sickness, and Karma Mayet’s Indigo Blue’s Opera. In 2010 she premiered her first solo piece, Bringing Back Home, an exploration of love within her relationship with her mother as an out queer Nigerian woman.

She is currently expanding this work and plans to debut it 2012 in her hometown, Nigeria coupled with dialogues with mothers and daughters around sexuality, sexual health, motherhood and love. Adaku is committed to holding intentional space for people to authentically express and heal themselves.

She is currently training to be a wholistic herbalist and is a certified Re-evaluation counselor, Rape Victim Crisis Counselor, and HIV/AIDS testing counselor.

She has created and facilitated workshops around vision mapping, life mapping, dance as prayer, hip hop yoga, effective youth adult partnership, sex positive practices, reproductive justice, self care/love practices, intentional self and community care, meditative movement.

Her biggest goal in life is to live love in its fullest expression. She is a constant work in progress, striving for the highest good in herself and in others.

For workshop and performance inquiries, contact soularbliss@gmail.com.

So basically, she’s a bawse and we’re so happy that she is in the world, making change <3

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Point of awareness: The BrownGrrlz Project