POC ZINE PROJECT

Posts tagged people of color

POC Zine Project wants to see YOUR #POCZINES Collection

What does your ‪#‎poczines‬ collection look like? Send us a photo of your shelf/drawer/area under your pillow/etc. & we’ll feature it in our ‪#‎izm2013‬ reactions post first week of August.

If you only have two zines created by POC, it’s still a collection - even if you made both of them!  

Deadline: August 28, 2013

PLEASE EMAIL: poczineproject@gmail.com (we are only accepting submissions through email, thanks!)

Please be sure to include the following:

- 1-3 max photos of your #poczines collection (please make sure they are as clear as possible) with photo credit info (the higher resolution the better, thanks!)

- your bio

- any links/contact info you want to share

- info about your own zines that YOU make (optional)

- any of your upcoming/current projects that need some signal boost love. We gotchu boo. 

We know many folks collect zines by authors of diverse backgrounds, so it’s 100% OK/common if you have a mix of POC and non-POC authored zines in your collection. However, for the purposes of this visibility exercise, we only want to see the zines made by POC in your collection (co-authored with non-POC is fine, as long as editor was/is POC).

WHITE FOLKS: Send photos & info about your #poczines collection as well! We wants to see the #poczines on your shelves too.

Please be sure to also include what POC solidarity looks like in your life, both in theory and in practice. 

<3,

POCZP

COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT: #CAHungerStrike #PelicanBay Awareness

POCZP Donor and Resistance Behind Bars author Victoria Law (who also edits Tenacious zine) will be on the ”Melissa Harris-Perry" show this Saturday, July 13 (show starts at 10am ET), to talk about what is happening at #PelicanBay and other prisons in California. Vikki will be discussing her recent article about the Pelican Bay hunger strikes and the families organizing in support of their demands.

Follow #nerdland on Twitter to view the related conversation during the show.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT #CAHungerStrike

Right now 30,000 prisoners in California are on hunger strike. According to Amnesty International, that is the largest hunger strike in the state’s history, encompassing roughly two-thirds of the state’s inmates.

For additional context on why the strike is happening, check out some of the shocking facts in the infographic below on the conditions of indefinite isolation in California, where more than 3,000 prisoners are held in these high security isolation units known as Security Housing Units (SHUS).

Additionally, The Sacramento Bee reports that the Center for Investigative Reporting found that the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation sterilized nearly 150 female inmates from 2006 to 2010 without required state approvals.

[DESCRIPTION: This single page infographic by Amnesty International is best viewed in full screen mode to zoom in on sections]

Follow #CAHungerStrike on Twitter to stay informed. 

MORE INFO FROM HOMIES UNIDOS

The California Prisoner’s Hunger Strike started once again on July 8, 2013. The protesters have said that they will not stop until demands are addressed even if that means giving their lives.

Sign the petition: The Petition

Statewide Rally at Corcoran State Prison

Saturday, July 13, 3:00 PM

Bus and carpool leaves from Los Angeles at 8:30 AM, 

From: Chuco’s Justice Center,1137 E. Redondo, Inglewood

THE FIVE DEMANDS 

The inhumane conditions inside CA dungeons, particularly in isolation - a form of torture -, brought prisoners together across racial, geographic, and political lines. They united to end hostilities and fight for changes in SHU conditions. These men have suffered injustice and torture for decades. Governors, wardens, courts, and media have disregarded all previous attempts to change conditions. As a result, the hunger-strikers have placed their lives on the line and developed five core demands: Link for Flier

  • End Group Punishment & Administrative Abuse: Hold people accountable for their individualactions,rather than punishing everyone. Collective punishment is a fascist practice!
  • Abolish the Debriefing Policy, and Modify Active/Inactive Gang Status Criteria: The ‘debriefing’ policy is known as “snitch or die” - since the only way out of the SHU is to debrief (inform on another prisoner). In some cases, people have been in the SHUs since the ’60s or ’70s for political beliefs or jailhouse lawyering. 
  • End Long-Term Solitary Confinement. Comply with 2006 US Commission on Safety and Abuse in America’s Prisons. International human rights organizations recognize sensory deprivation is psychological torture. 
  • Provide Adequate and Nutritious Food, adequate medical care, and access to natural light.
  • Expand and Provide Constructive Programming and Privileges for Indefinite SHU Status Inmates. People in SHUs aren’t released, since there’s no constructive program available with which to qualify for parole.

Join the Hunger Strike Solidarity Coalition and bring in your school, union, community or coreligionists. Hunger Strike Solidarity So Cal Coalition (in formation) includes families, ex-prisoners & others. To get involved, 213-858-3486 or hungerstrikesolidaritysocal@gmail.com

For more information about the Five Core Demands, please visitprisonerhungerstrikesolidarity.wordpress.com  

Facebook Invite: https://www.facebook.com/events/672950029398476/

In October 2012 incarcerated people in the hunger strike came to an agreement to end all hostilities against each other, the agreement can be found here: 

http://prisonerhungerstrikesolidarity.wordpress.com/2012/09/11/short-corridor-collective-calls-for-statewide-end-to-hostilities/ 

ADDITIONAL MEDIA COVERAGE

Photos of Protesters Against Solitary Confinement - LA Daily News Media 

http://photos.dailynews.com/2013/07/photos-protesters-against-solitary-confinement/?utm_source=buffer&utm_campaign=Buffer&utm_content=buffere54e5&utm_medium=twitter#3

 Los Angeles Times:

Spanish Interviews:
Maria and Jesus Aguirre speak of their struggles with their loves in prison and the hunger strike. starts at 47 minutes.

http://archive.kpfk.org/mp3/kpfk_130709_213030vocesdelibertad.MP3

Spanish interview on Telemundo with Delia Rodriguez on the Hunger Strike:

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=4476878340187&set=o.520666777981595&type=2&theater 

Spanish coverage of the Hunger Strike:

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=4476560252235&set=o.520666777981595&type=2&theater 

——————-

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

June 30 is POC Zine Project’s One Year Tumblr Anniversary!

On June 30, 2012, The POC Zine Project Tumblr was “born” at Hive Learning Network NYC's Summer Code Party Pop-Up with Tumblr and Mozilla at DCTV. Not only did we receive help from Tumblr staff in setting up this Tumblr, POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano was able to share information in real time about POCZP at the event (see image from that day below) with attendees!

image

 

Since June of 2012, POZCP has shared information about zines by people of color and intersectional projects with the Tumblr community. We brought you daily recaps from our first-ever Race Riot! Tour last fall because it was important to us to keep you informed.

For the past year, we’ve appreciate your submissions, reblogs and feedback. Prior to the launch of the POCZP Tumblr in 2012, we were actively “listening” on Tumblr through private accounts since 2007 — tracking “zine”-tagged posts, observing how folks of color from all walks of life use Tumblr, how zinesters were using Tumblr and figuring out what our short and long term goals are for this space <3

We hope that we help make your Tumblr explorations a fun, inspiring and informative experience. If you’ve benefitted in any way from our efforts on Tumblr, please consider making a donation of any amount to POC Zine Project.

We are in the process of planning our second Race Riot! Tour and must raise $14,000 to cover the costs of a 20 city national tour, which will take place in October and November of 2013. We’ve expanded the tour to include cities in the midwest and a date in Mexico. We know we can do it but we need your help. <3 Thanks for your support.

- POC Zine Project

P.S. If you don’t have any funds—we hear ya! POCZP is a grassroots organization and we are all volunteers. We have operated without 501(c)(3) status the past three years for a reason: to stay as free as possible, so we can move as quickly as possible. Help the cause by forwarding this link to friends on your social accounts, email and by reblogging. We appreciate the love.

——————-

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

POC Zine Project ‘Let’s Talk About’ column #1: ‘I Make Books…That’s My Shit’

Free Poet's Press website

I Make Books…That’s My Shit: Notes on How I Came to Media Making

By POCZP Midwest Coordinator Chaun Webster, founder of Free Poet’s Press

I make books…that’s my shit.  Love the smell of the pages.  I can recall more than a few embarrassing moments as a child with my head stuck in them as I sat in the library taking deep breaths in.  But more than just the book object, I love reading.  Sci-fi of the order of Octavia Butler, Wild Seed, YES PLEASE!  

Prison Letters from George Jackson, Autobiography by Assata Shakur, Biomythography of Audre Lorde or Maxine Hong Kingston.  I can’t get enough of the magic of language, the dance of the letters on the page as meanings collide in the sometimes challenging, sometimes breathtaking moments.  From Eduardo Galeano, to Ben Okri, to Gloria Anzuldia, I continue to be baptized.  

But more than just reading perhaps it is story that draws me, for I cannot remember my mother ever reading me something that she ever wrote down, but she could tell a story masterfully.  Whether the mysterious, the anecdotal or the epic, she knew how to draw from the powers of her experiences and bear witness.

This is some of the spirit with which I came to my own form of media making, the writing and publishing performing the same gesture that my mother’s storytelling did.  Though I don’t believe she was cognizant of it her stories were a gesture of power, of recognizing that we are here, and that though the legitimate records have criminally left us absent, we will continue to bear witness.  That witness can serve the purpose of balm or explosive strapped to the structures that assault us day to day.  

In my journey with books I would read the record of David Walker and his Appeal, make my own connections to that account and Nat Turner’s rebellion. There was a sense I came to about the interrelation of culture and resistance. Whether it was with this narrative or the work of Ida B. Wells, Lewis Michaux, Dudley Randall or Haki Madhubuti and their respective presses or bookstores, there was something to be said about culture and movement-making.

How do we imagine what has happened or what is possible? What force shapes the way we desire or negotiate and even dare to undermine the structures that govern, if not a cultural force?

Knowing of these stories and of their power was what made me so perplexed by “zinesters” who located that practice in something that was most often raced white and gendered male. The idea of DIY as chic, or a form of branding, misses the substance of the politically performed practice of enslaved Afrikans for whom writing was made illegal. Those same Afrikans who wrote anyway to bear witness that we were here, and will remain. It omits the work of the Black and Brown women who have held the traditions together and whose words work as mortar and sledgehammer.

I make books because there was something humanizing in seeing Jessica Care Moore’s Moore Black Press. It’s power signified something local in knowledge production, that that act was not always external.

I make books because there is a space between oppression and resistance that culture occupies, because cultural revolution is the weapon and because I intend to be fully armed.

_____________________

image

Free Poet’s Press is a small publishing company started in 2009 by Chaun Webster (POCZP Midwest Coordinator) with the intent of empowering Black and Brown artists to control their own images. 

_____________________

"Let’s Talk About…" is an experimental series by POCZP created to share communal knowledge, resources and reflections on a wide range of topics affecting communities of color.

If you are a person of color—or a white person with a history of supporting POC Zine Project— who wants to contribute to “Let’s Talk About…” submit to poczineproject@gmail.com with “Let’s Talk About” in the subject line. 

All submissions to "Let’s Talk About…" will be compiled into a zine (print & digital) that will be released by POCZP in December of 2013.

_____________________

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

Meet POCZP&#8217;s West Coast Coordinator Liz Mayorga!
Part of POC Zine Project’s advocacy is empowering new and seasoned zinesters of color in the U.S. (and soon worldwide) to share their stories while supporting other POC. Liz is the second official regional coordinator for POCZP (meet Joyce, our Midwest Coordinator, here). We are excited to share developments as this part of our experiment in activism and community through materiality unfolds. 
LIZ, IN HER OWN WORDS
Liz was born in Los Angeles, California, but moved back and forth between Mexico and LA throughout her childhood. She is the youngest of three and the only female in a traditional, Catholic, Mexican-American family. 
Though her brothers taught her how to throw a good punch, she was often confused by the strict gender roles in rural Mexican society, which told her to be passive and meek. Luckily, Los Angeles was a place where contradiction could exist, a place where you could an aggressive girl, and a Mexican Punk. LA and the influence of popular culture gave Liz an identity she could be proud of.
She moved to the Bay Area for school, but ended up falling in love with SF Zine Fest, and community of artists. They pushed her to pursue her passion for Art and Literature. 
Liz now writes fiction and non-fiction, makes comics (check out Inked), and is a working illustrator. Her inspiration comes from her crazy family and Chican@ Pop Culture. She is the Co-Director of San Francisco Zine Fest (SFZF) and is now happy to be a part of the POC Zine Project.
See Liz in action at a recent POCZP Youth Zine workshop in San Francisco, where she led activities with assistance from POCZP intern Itoro Udofia.
Liz hopes to expand and connect the DIY West Coast community and serve as a resource. She wants DIY projects (and zines) by people of color to be especially accessible to youth, because she needed community this open and empowering as a teenager. 
It is also a goal of hers to promote multi-media as a part of zine/DIY culture and expand the limits of what a zine could be, because artists, especially artists with a story to tell, need to be more visible.
Learn more about Liz here: lizmayorga.com
COMMUNITY: Join us in welcoming Liz. We are excited to support zine culture and POC storytelling on the West Coast! We will have several events in this region during the 2013 Race Riot! tour. Stay tuned for details …
DO YOU WANT TO BE A COORDINATOR LIKE LIZ?
If you want to support POCZP with Liz, other coordinators, interns and our touring members, let us know! 
We are also looking for representatives in every state, as well as regional  support, as we build toward the National POC Zinester &amp; Ally Conference/Convergence. Ideally you have some experience with organizing events and building community, but experience is not required. All are welcome. Priority will be given to people of color who apply but allies are definitely welcome.
Contact poczineproject@gmail.com for more details with “regional coordinator” as the subject line.
If you are outside the U.S. and want to be a part of our emerging POCZP Global Ambassadors program, email poczineproject@gmail.com as well to stay informed as opportunities arise.
SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT
If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.
DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

Meet POCZP’s West Coast Coordinator Liz Mayorga!

Part of POC Zine Project’s advocacy is empowering new and seasoned zinesters of color in the U.S. (and soon worldwide) to share their stories while supporting other POC. Liz is the second official regional coordinator for POCZP (meet Joyce, our Midwest Coordinator, here). We are excited to share developments as this part of our experiment in activism and community through materiality unfolds. 

LIZ, IN HER OWN WORDS

Liz was born in Los Angeles, California, but moved back and forth between Mexico and LA throughout her childhood. She is the youngest of three and the only female in a traditional, Catholic, Mexican-American family.

Though her brothers taught her how to throw a good punch, she was often confused by the strict gender roles in rural Mexican society, which told her to be passive and meek. Luckily, Los Angeles was a place where contradiction could exist, a place where you could an aggressive girl, and a Mexican Punk. LA and the influence of popular culture gave Liz an identity she could be proud of.

She moved to the Bay Area for school, but ended up falling in love with SF Zine Fest, and community of artists. They pushed her to pursue her passion for Art and Literature.

Liz now writes fiction and non-fiction, makes comics (check out Inked), and is a working illustrator. Her inspiration comes from her crazy family and Chican@ Pop Culture. She is the Co-Director of San Francisco Zine Fest (SFZF) and is now happy to be a part of the POC Zine Project.

See Liz in action at a recent POCZP Youth Zine workshop in San Francisco, where she led activities with assistance from POCZP intern Itoro Udofia.

Liz hopes to expand and connect the DIY West Coast community and serve as a resource. She wants DIY projects (and zines) by people of color to be especially accessible to youth, because she needed community this open and empowering as a teenager.

It is also a goal of hers to promote multi-media as a part of zine/DIY culture and expand the limits of what a zine could be, because artists, especially artists with a story to tell, need to be more visible.

Learn more about Liz here: lizmayorga.com

COMMUNITY: Join us in welcoming Liz. We are excited to support zine culture and POC storytelling on the West Coast! We will have several events in this region during the 2013 Race Riot! tour. Stay tuned for details …

DO YOU WANT TO BE A COORDINATOR LIKE LIZ?

If you want to support POCZP with Liz, other coordinators, interns and our touring members, let us know!

We are also looking for representatives in every state, as well as regional  support, as we build toward the National POC Zinester & Ally Conference/Convergence. Ideally you have some experience with organizing events and building community, but experience is not required. All are welcome. Priority will be given to people of color who apply but allies are definitely welcome.

Contact poczineproject@gmail.com for more details with “regional coordinator” as the subject line.

If you are outside the U.S. and want to be a part of our emerging POCZP Global Ambassadors program, email poczineproject@gmail.com as well to stay informed as opportunities arise.

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

Community,
The second #raceriottour is going down in October of 2013 through twelve more U.S. cities and we want YOU to come with us.
We are looking for the following:
Guest readers in every city* (you must be a person of color)
Rotating tour buddies: Join us on the road and participate in 1-3 tour events as a panelist/reader/tabler
POC (or POC fronted) bands to perform at each #raceriottour event!
More POC &amp; ally tablers for each city: come to a POCZP event in your town and table for your zine/org/collective/creative project (check out some of the POC artists/merchants who tabled last year) &lt;3
We&#8217;re also looking for folks to help us produce #raceriottour fundraiser events between now and September. This might be a good solution for you if you are unable to travel.
Contact poczineproject@gmail.com for more details. Make sure to use &#8220;2013 RACE RIOT TOUR&#8221; as the email subject.
COMMUNITY QUESTIONS
We’re connecting with people and holding events through the Southwest and West Coast, including (but not limited to) Atlanta, New Orleans, Austin, Los Angeles, Sacramento and Seattle.
If we were to come to your town, what are the POC run/led spaces that have a history of serving communities of color? We are committed to to holding every event on this tour in a POC-affirming space. Tell us in the reblog note or send us a message.
If you’re down to help us organize an event as part of our second Race Riot! tour in YOUR city, let us know!
&lt;3
POC Zine Project
*We will announce the full list of confirmed 2013 #raceriottour cities on February 14 15, 2013.
ABOUT THE RACE RIOT! TOUR
POC Zine Project held its first Race Riot! Tour in 2012, producing 20 events in 14 U.S. cities, which included speaking engagements at six universities. Click here to view photos from the POC Zine Project: 2012 Race Riot! Tour tour finale at Death By Audio in Brooklyn and access all the tour stop recaps.
We will be taking the Race Riot! Tour through 12 more U.S. cities in 2013. Stay tuned for updates as we work on partnering with POC-affirming orgs overseas. If you are outside the U.S. and want to be a part of our emerging POCZP Global Ambassadors program, email poczineproject@gmail.com. 
SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT
If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.
DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

Community,

The second #raceriottour is going down in October of 2013 through twelve more U.S. cities and we want YOU to come with us.

We are looking for the following:

  • Guest readers in every city* (you must be a person of color)
  • Rotating tour buddies: Join us on the road and participate in 1-3 tour events as a panelist/reader/tabler
  • POC (or POC fronted) bands to perform at each #raceriottour event!
  • More POC & ally tablers for each city: come to a POCZP event in your town and table for your zine/org/collective/creative project (check out some of the POC artists/merchants who tabled last year) <3

We’re also looking for folks to help us produce #raceriottour fundraiser events between now and September. This might be a good solution for you if you are unable to travel.

Contact poczineproject@gmail.com for more details. Make sure to use “2013 RACE RIOT TOUR” as the email subject.

COMMUNITY QUESTIONS

We’re connecting with people and holding events through the Southwest and West Coast, including (but not limited to) Atlanta, New Orleans, Austin, Los Angeles, Sacramento and Seattle.

If we were to come to your town, what are the POC run/led spaces that have a history of serving communities of color? We are committed to to holding every event on this tour in a POC-affirming space. Tell us in the reblog note or send us a message.

If you’re down to help us organize an event as part of our second Race Riot! tour in YOUR city, let us know!

<3

POC Zine Project

*We will announce the full list of confirmed 2013 #raceriottour cities on February 14 15, 2013.

ABOUT THE RACE RIOT! TOUR

POC Zine Project held its first Race Riot! Tour in 2012, producing 20 events in 14 U.S. cities, which included speaking engagements at six universities. Click here to view photos from the POC Zine Project: 2012 Race Riot! Tour tour finale at Death By Audio in Brooklyn and access all the tour stop recaps.

We will be taking the Race Riot! Tour through 12 more U.S. cities in 2013. Stay tuned for updates as we work on partnering with POC-affirming orgs overseas. If you are outside the U.S. and want to be a part of our emerging POCZP Global Ambassadors program, email poczineproject@gmail.com. 

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

Three-year anniversary statement
Imagine that your path to self actualization is like crossing a rushing, dangerous river — and the only way to get across is by accessing stepping stones in the water. Now, pretend that each of those stones is a form of media you reference in your daily life. You will see that certain people are drawn to certain stones. Different variables create inequality, which informs progress (or lack of).You&#8217;ll see how some people, particularly white people invested in keeping people of color from moving forward, prevent a lot of self actualizing from happening. You&#8217;ll see it in real time and in the history of this river (life).POC Zine Project is about cultivating stepping stones — points of cultural reference — for people of color to utilize and draw strength &amp; healing from on their path. 

We are here to disrupt. We&#8217;re connecting people to life lines. We&#8217;re empowering people of color to create new maps for self actualization, while identifying existing ones.We&#8217;re both educating and learning from allies, who evolve along with us.From this paradigm, you will begin to understand why POCZP is an experiment in activism and community through materiality, and why we are committed to being a space of healing for people of color.Through the duration of this project, we will change all the time, because our community is changing all the time. We are growing, learning, collaborating and thriving — all the time. We are constantly observing, assessing, reflecting, revising and evolving. We both live inside academia and in direct opposition to it. We embrace our existence as a blessed bundle of contradictions devoted to supporting self actualization and liberation for POC. After three years at this, we are proud to declare it:We are POC Zine Project and our mission is to make zines by people of color easy to find, distribute and share. We are an experiment in activism and community through materiality, and function as an advocacy platform and incubator for liberation.Thank you for your support.
———————————————————
ABOUT THE RACE RIOT! TOUR
POC Zine Project held its first Race Riot! Tour in 2012, producing 20 events in 14 cities, which included speaking engagements at six universities. Click here to view photos from the POC Zine Project: 2012 Race Riot! Tour tour finale at Death By Audio in Brooklyn and access all the tour stop recaps.
STAY INFORMED
We will be taking the Race Riot! Tour through 14 more cities in 2013. Stay tuned!
Facebook.com/POCZineProject
Twitter.com/poczineproject
poczineproject.tumblr.com
SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT
If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour and the poverty zine series.
DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh
You can also send well-concealed cash or a check! Email daniela@dcapmedia.com for details or if you have questions.
Info about the poverty zine series: http://bit.ly/RLVTVt
&lt;3,
POC Zine Project

Three-year anniversary statement

Imagine that your path to self actualization is like crossing a rushing, dangerous river — and the only way to get across is by accessing stepping stones in the water. 

Now, pretend that each of those stones is a form of media you reference in your daily life. You will see that certain people are drawn to certain stones. Different variables create inequality, which informs progress (or lack of).

You’ll see how some people, particularly white people invested in keeping people of color from moving forward, prevent a lot of self actualizing from happening. You’ll see it in real time and in the history of this river (life).

POC Zine Project is about cultivating stepping stones — points of cultural reference — for people of color to utilize and draw strength & healing from on their path. 

Rushing River

We are here to disrupt. 

We’re connecting people to life lines. 

We’re empowering people of color to create new maps for self actualization, while identifying existing ones.

We’re both educating and learning from allies, who evolve along with us.

From this paradigm, you will begin to understand why POCZP is an experiment in activism and community through materiality, and why we are committed to being a space of healing for people of color.

Through the duration of this project, we will change all the time, because our community is changing all the time. We are growing, learning, collaborating and thriving — all the time. We are constantly observing, assessing, reflecting, revising and evolving. 

We both live inside academia and in direct opposition to it. 

We embrace our existence as a blessed bundle of contradictions devoted to supporting self actualization and liberation for POC. 

After three years at this, we are proud to declare it:

We are POC Zine Project and our mission is to make zines by people of color easy to find, distribute and share. 

We are an experiment in activism and community through materiality, and function as an advocacy platform and incubator for liberation.

Thank you for your support.

———————————————————

ABOUT THE RACE RIOT! TOUR

POC Zine Project held its first Race Riot! Tour in 2012, producing 20 events in 14 cities, which included speaking engagements at six universities. Click here to view photos from the POC Zine Project: 2012 Race Riot! Tour tour finale at Death By Audio in Brooklyn and access all the tour stop recaps.

STAY INFORMED

We will be taking the Race Riot! Tour through 14 more cities in 2013. Stay tuned!

Facebook.com/POCZineProject

Twitter.com/poczineproject

poczineproject.tumblr.com

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

You can also send well-concealed cash or a check! Email daniela@dcapmedia.com for details or if you have questions.

Info about the poverty zine series: http://bit.ly/RLVTVt

<3,

POC Zine Project

SOLIDARITY SPOTLIGHT: Support Matt Duran + read this zine about Pacific Northwest grand jury resisters

In the spirit of spreading this important information, POC Zine Project has archived and made available to embed and share the FOR THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST GRAND JURY RESISTERS zine.

This zine, created by New York Year Zero, provides an overview of the situation regarding the currently imprisoned Pacific Northwest grand jury resisters. Consisting of 72-pages, this zine also functions as a timely primer on grand juries in general. 

READ NOW + SIGNAL BOOST <3

This zine also includes the resisters’ statements, news articles, tips on what to do if you’re subpoenaed to testify before a grand jury, and a detailed history of grand juries and their use as a tool to suppress political organizing and revolutionary struggle in the United States.

Click here to read a statement by Matt Duran, APOC who has been locked away since September 13, 2012 for refusing to cooperate with a secret federal Grand Jury investigation targeting anarchists in the Pacific Northwest.

FREE MATT DURAN

Send mail to Matt at:

Matthew Kyle Duran #42565-086

FDC SeaTac

P.O. Box 13900

Seattle, WA 98191

Click here for guidelines to make sure that Matt receives your mail!

To donate money for Matt’s commissary and for visitors’ gas costs, or to arrange your visit to Matt, please email visitationformattduran@riseup.net

UPCOMING EVENT

On Saturday, November 17, at 3:30pm there will be a noise demonstration in front of the SeaTac Federal Detention Center (S 200th St & 26th Ave S, Seatac, WA) in solidarity with imprisoned Grand Jury resisters Matt Duran and Katherine “Kteeo” Olejnik.

Bring banners, loud noise-makers, flyers, and whatever else could be useful. Please send this announcement to listserves and invite your friends.

MORE INFO

http://nopoliticalrepression.wordpress.com/

Tides of Flame report (pdf)

Write to ALL the PNW grand jury resisters!

Matthew Kyle Duran #42565-086
FDC SeaTac
P.O. Box 13900
Seattle, WA 98198

Katherine Olejnik #42592-086
FDC SeaTac,
P.O. Box 13900
Seattle, WA 98198

Leah-Lynn Plante (no longer in jail)

ZINE LIBRARIANS: Please print this zine (you can download), add to our collection and signal boost through your networks. Thank you.

In 1936 a Harlem postal worker and activist named Victor H. Green decided to develop a guide that would help African Americans travel throughout the country in a safe and comfortable manner. The Negro Motorist Green Book (also called The Negro Travelers’ Green Book), often simply known as The Green Book, identified places that welcomed black people during an era when Jim Crow laws and de facto segregation made it difficult for them to travel domestically without fear of racial backlash.

Black History Road Trip: Negro Motorist Green Book Destinations (via tballardbrown)

The Green Book still exists today.

Don’t think that shit is over.

(via hamburgerjack)

That’s the first thing you tell fam from out of state who decide to go exploring. “Don’t go here, here, here, or here after dark. You can go here, but they will seat you last if you stop at the applebee’s. And don’t go there at all. Just don’t do it.”

(via blackraincloud)

——————————————-

Thanks for sharing information about The Negro Motorist Green Book! It’s a perfect example of how the zine medium (before it was called zines) has been used by people of color for centuries to share information through independent publications.

Click here to see the complete 1949 edition of The Negro Motorist Green Book in pdf format, provided by autolife.