POC ZINE PROJECT

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SCENE REPORT: MOONROOT + POC Zine Project session at Allied Media Conference 2013 [Pt 1 of 3]

Allied Media Conference 2013 is from June 20 - 23, 2013. This is POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano’s recap from #AMC2013 on Friday, June 21.

Part of my advocacy—and what has informed POCZP’s focus—is to make information accessible to people of color who might not otherwise have access for a multitude of reasons. That being said, so much happened yesterday that my mind is in a whirl about what to share. I want to help those who can’t be at this year’s conference to feel like they are a part of it—that the information being shared here belongs to them too. I would not be at #AMC2013 if it wasn’t for the support of my co-presenters MOONROOT & Adela C. Licona, so I want to share what’s going on here with the POCZP community.

But how do I condense Day 1 (made up of so many experiences as a first time attendee and presenter) into one Tumblr post? Seems impossible. But instead of continuing to pace anxiously in my hotel room, I will simply share some brief notes, photos and videos from yesterday. I hope that—wherever you are, whoever you are (but especially my people of color)—you enjoy this first recap and tap into some of the excitement, inspiration, beauty and community I experienced at my first day of Allied Media Conference. Enjoy! <3

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DAY ONE OF WORKSHOPS AT 2013 ALLIED MEDIA CONFERENCE

Friday was our (POCZP’s) session with our allies/collaborators MOONROOT and professor Adela C. Licona. The name of our session was Zine-making Across the Diaspora.

MOONROOT folks Linda and Sine brought their zine-making materials and zine-making knowledge, as well as their positive, loving energy. If they were nervous, I could not tell. I was nervous but also excited.

SPOTTED: Linda and Sine from MOONROOT zine collective #amc2013 #zines #poczines #detroit

[DESCRIPTION: MOONROOT’s Linda (L) and Sine (R). Sine helped POCZP produce our Baltimore event last year.]

[DESCRIPTION: In this video, folks start to arrive to our session and POCZP Midwest Coordinator Joyce Hatton says hello <3]

We had a spacious & lovely art room to present in at Wayne State University in Detroit. As people began to show up to participate, all my nerves melted away. I felt so affirmed and energized by their presence.

SPOTTED: Hawa from @browntourage presentingvat #amc2013 browntourage.com

[DESCRIPTION: Hawa from @browntourage who is presenting at #amc2013 attended our session: browntourage.com. I look forward to building with them in Oakland late this fall.]

There were 40-50 people in attendance, which felt like such a blessing. There are so many incredible workshops here that overlap so I was excited and surprised when our room was at capacity.

SPOTTED: Texta felt-tip superhero www.textaqueen.com @textaaa #poczines

[DESCRIPTION: TEXTAQUEEN came to our #amc2013 session but this photo is from June 20, 2013, the day before. We are going to collaborate with TEXTA so that they can be a part of this year’s Race Riot! Tour. We just need to raise the funds! <3]

It was a transformative & inspiring experience for me to share information with other people of color who are invested in celebrating the rich history of zines/independent publications by people of color.

SPOTTED: "Zines in Third Space" author Adela and Fargo-Moorhead Zine Fest founder & POCZP Midwest Coordinator Joyce Hatton! #poczines #zines #amc2013

[DESCRIPTION: Adela (L) and POCZP Midwest Coordinator Joyce Hatton (R) at our #AMC2013 session. It was exciting to finally meet Joyce in person after months of communicating/planning via the web and phone!]

Adela explained her “third space” theory with everyone, which you can learn more about in her book “Zines in Third Space.” POC Zine Project is a “third space” too (so am I, as a person/activist)! Adela and I will do a post on “third space” theory after the conference to help explain it all. …Many of you reading this now not only function/thrive in “third spaces” but are also living & breathing examples of “third space” theory.

But yeah—our session! In addition to talking about the history of zines from a POC lens, we had fun making zines!

June 21, 2013: Folks making zines at our #amc2013 #makezines session

Some folks in attendance had never made a zine before and I was honored to be a part of their first experience.  

Folks making zines at our #amc2013 #makezines session on Friday, June 21, 2013 SPOTTED: POCZP founder Daniela & MOONROOT zine collective member Sine before their #amc2013 #makezines session

[DESCRIPTION: Co-presenters POCZP founder Daniela and MOONROOT’s Sine]

Attendees making #zines at our session at #amc2013 #makezines on June 21 2013 Folks making #zines at our #amc2013 #makezines session with MOONROOT and Adela C. LIcona on June 21 2013 Folks making and reading #zines at our #amc2013 #makezines session with MOONROOT and Adela C. Licona

SPOTTED: Gabby Rivera @quirkyrican w her first mini #zine #amc2013 #wemakezines

[DESCRIPTION: Gabby Rivera @quirkyrican smiles at lunchtime with her first mini-zine made at our session]

SPOTTED: Billione shares their mini #zine from our #makezines #amc2013 session with MOONROOT

[DESCRIPTION: Billione shares his mini-zine from our #makezines #amc2013 session with MOONROOT: getbillione.blogspot.com/]

It was also a great learning experience for me to experience condensing the history of zines (with a focus on POC history) into five minutes (I think I did ok)! Due to time constraints, I had to keep it to U.S. zine history but it’s important to note that zine culture is worldwide and that POC make zines about any topic you can think of—worldwide.

POCZP, as part of our Legacy Series, will be sharing more zines by POC from all parts of the world. Stay tune for more on that …

All the #amc2013 #makezines presenters from left to right: Adela C. Licona, Moonroot's Linda, POCZP founder Daniela and Moonroot's Sine

[DESCRIPTION: All the presenters from our session from left to right: Adela C. Licona, MOONROOT’s Linda, POCZP founder Daniela and MOONROOT’s Sine <3]

After my spur-of-the-moment call to action during the zine-making phase (which MOONROOT did a terrific job leading), 10-12 (need to check my bag again) folks who made zines donated them to the POC Zine Project archive!

Some of the mini #zines made at #amc2013 #wemakezines our session w MOONROOT

[DESCRIPTION: Some of the mini-zines folks made at our #AMC2013 #MAKEZINES session with MOONROOT and Adela C. Licona on June 21, 2013]

I will be scanning the mini-zines and sharing them with you all (with permission from the creators) on POCZP’s digital platforms and then mailing back the originals <3

After our session, I took a lunch/connect with allies/friends/resting break and then went to another workshop at #AMC2013 called Designing Games to Understand Complexity.

Spotted: people playing games at the designing games to understand complexity session at #amc2013 on June 21 2013

That experience further inspired me to create a #poczines online game to help people learn more about the rich history of zines/independent publications by people of color from the 1700s - 2000s. More on that later …

After the games workshop, I attended the #AMC2013 opening ceremony, where after an inspiring recap of AMC’s last 15 years was shared, a spontaneous dance party broke out on stage.

People rush the stage to dance at the #amc2013 opening ceremony on June 21, 2013 <3

[DESCRIPTION: #AMC2013 attendees rush the stage to dance at the June 21, 2013 opening ceremony]

It was so beautiful that for many reasons I felt my eyes filling with tears. I hope this gives you somewhat of a sense of what I was seeing and feeling.

Dancing, love and joy at the #amc2013 opening ceremony #detroit on Friday, June 21, 2013 Beautiful crowd surfing at the opening ceremony at #amc2013 #detroit. People of all ages were crowd surfing on stage! Folks workin it out after rushing the stage to dance at opening ceremony #amc2013 #detroit June 21, 2013 POCZP midwest coordinator Joyce Hatton after dancing on stage at #amc2013 #detroit on June 21, 2013 <3

[DESCRIPTION: POCZP Midwest Coordinator Joyce Hatton smiles after dancing on stage at the #AMC2013 opening ceremony on June 21, 2013]

[DESCRIPTION” People dancing at the opening ceremony on June 21, 2013 at #AMC2013. Vine by Ryann Supamakenzi]

Today (Saturday, June 22, 2013) I plan on attending another workshop and getting some free acupuncture (my first experience) and a tarot reading by Jade Fair, who you can see in the photo below. Jade Fair will be joining this year’s Race Riot! tour …

upload

 [DESCRIPTION: Jade Fair holds her first zine SOFT SERVE #1 at #AMC2013 on June 20, 2013. Interview with her coming next week <3]

I hope you enjoyed my first recap from #AMC2013. Let me know what you want to see more of! I will do my best to help make this event as accessible as possible for those who could not attend. You are here with me in spirit and I feel your support and positive energy. <3

Love & Solidarity,

Daniela Capistrano

Founder, POC Zine Project

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ABOUT ALLIED MEDIA CONFERENCE

The Allied Media Conference is a collaborative laboratory of media-based organizing strategies for transforming our world, held every Summer in Detroit.

CREATE

At the AMC, we understand media as any way in which we communicate with the world, from zines to breakdancing, to designing neighborhood-based communications infrastructure. We share and create media that exposes, investigates, heals, builds confidence and radical hope, incites dialogue and debate. We demystify technology, not only learning how to use it, but how to design and build our own.  In doing so, we redefine technology’s role and impact in our lives. The AMC creates learning environments for all ages and skill levels, including hands-on workshops, strategy sessions, presentations and performances.

CONNECT

 The AMC is a network of networks – social justice organizers, community technologists, transformative artists, educators, entrepreneurs, and many others — all using media in innovative ways. Some of these networks sprout from the conference, grow over the course of the year then reconvene in Detroit larger and healthier. Others use the AMC as an annual point of convergence and a space to forge new relationships. Through cycles of participatory investigation and experimentation, our networks continue to grow, generating new theories and practices of media-based organizing.

TRANSFORM

As our networks grow, so does our capacity to take collective actions to transform our world. At the AMC, we develop new leaders and new forms of leadership, design new methods of problem-solving, cultivate the visions of our communities and build our power to make those visions real. 

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

ZINE SPOTLIGHT: How to Stage a Coup [NOW AVAILABLE ONLINE AND FOR DISTRO]

image

Earlier this year Helen Luu donated her original flat for How to Stage a Coup: An Insurrection of the Underground Liberation Army (2000) to POCZP, which we scanned just in time for POCZP’s participation at Allied Media Conference in Detroit.

Yes, it’s here!!!

READ & SHARE ‘HOW TO STAGE A COUP’

POCZP’s mission is to make zines by people of color easy to find, distribute and share. We are thrilled to share this legacy zine with the world in digital form and will be providing (sliding-scale priced) print copies at all Race Riot! tour events this fall.

HTSAC will be free for all POC attendees at Race Riot! tour events.

***This zine is best viewed online or via mobile in full-screen mode***

TITLE: How to Stage a Coup: An Insurrection of the Underground Liberation Army 

EDITOR: Helen Luu

PUBLISHED: 2000

DESCRIPTION BY POCZP TOUR MEMBER MIMI THI NGUYEN IN 2000:

Helen Luu recently edited a compilation zine called How To Stage A Coup, aimed at creating a dialogue among people of color involved in subcultural pursuits (including punk rock) around race, racism and politics. Contributors like Lauren Martin (You Might As Well Live, Quantify), Lynn Hou (Cyanide), Celia Prez (I Dreamed I Was Assertive), Elizabeth Martinez (Colorlines) and Vincent Chung address a wide variety of issues from organizing and identity politics, to activist dynamics and punk rock betrayals. What does it mean to look at the photographs of Third World suffering on the covers of grindcore records? What does it mean to talk about “pride”? Where was the “color” in Seattle/WTO? What comes first – “being brown or being famous”? The contributors to this compilation ask important questions that need asking, again and again, and Helen Luu brings it all together. 

Click here for the rest of Mimi’s interview, and check out Helen’s DJ projects as MissRuckus.

DO YOU WANT TO DISTRO ‘HOW TO STAGE A COUP’?

We announced on our Facebook page that we have two digital downloads available:

1) Print version

This version was made from a scan of the original flat. It was created with the intention of sharing with folks for distribution of the print version.

2) Read-version

This is the online-friendly version you can see in the embed above. This file is best viewed in e-readers or printed with the expectation that it will be page by page and not the same as the flat.

HOW TO ACCESS HTSAC FILES

We’re raising funds to make 200+ print versions of How to Stage a Coup to give away during tour, so we’re asking folks interested in gaining access to either files to email poczineproject@gmail.com with information about how they plan to use it.

Based on that info (and our relationship with that person/collective), we will ask for a sliding scale donation in exchange for access to a secure file.

We will be providing free access to both downloads on a case-by-case basis. In the meantime, enjoy the read-only version above.

We look forward to seeing more copies of How to Stage a Coup in circulation and on shelves in venues/zine libraries/archives worldwide! 

Please note that, per Luu’s donation statement, "This zine and the parts within it are not to be used for profit (paying for expenses is okay though)."

We’ll have more details about who follows up to distro and archive How to Stage a Coup in the coming weeks and months. 

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

ZINE SPOTLIGHT: Not Straight Not White Not Male

NOT STRAIGHT NOT WHITE NOT MALE

TITLE: Not Straight Not White Male

AUTHOR: rosi

ORIGIN: Los Angeles, USA

RELEASE: December, 2012

DESCRIPTION BY AUTHOR:

I wrote this zine because there is a lack of media that I can really, truly relate to. It is glaringly obvious that this radical scene is comprised mostly of heteros, of whites, and of males. I am Asian, I am hella gay, and I am female.

Disclaimer: I wrote this for me a lot more than I wrote it for you. There is a lack of solution offering, and at the same time a lot rambling, because it is cathartic for me. It is highly anecdotal; I write from experience. Don’t assume that my aim is to educate ignorant fucks. It is not my job to cry and bleed so that they can fucking evolve.

Always for the greater gay,
xROSIx

ROSI, IN HER OWN WORDS:

I am Vietnamese-American, female and hella gay (also vegan, straightedge, intersectional-feminist, anti-theist/agnostic and non-pacifist). So this is written from that perspective.

POCZP REVIEWS ‘NOT STRAIGHT NOT WHITE NOT MALE’

By Joyce Hatton, POCZP Midwest Coordinator

Yesterday I was leaving the gym with a friend of mine, and we were debating the existence of the “Lobster and Lefse Festival.”  I said “But it’s a whole weekend! How can you make a whole weekend out of lobster and lefse?!”  Two older white women started chatting with us and assured us that it was a real thing, and yes, it was a weekend long.  It was a friendly chat until one woman said “Here in North Dakota we can make a weekend out of anything,” and suddenly my friend and I weren’t laughing.

It hurts when people assume that I’m not from here, that their culture is not my culture.  It burns, because I know the only reason they think that is because I’m black.  I am steeped in Uff da culture, this is my home, but I am always treated as in outsider in my home.

I recently read “Not Straight Not White Not Male” by rosi, and it was a balm to my irritated soul.  In the disclaimer she said “I wrote this for me a lot more than I wrote it for you.  There is a lack of solution offering and at the same time a lot of rambling, because it is cathartic for me. Don’t assume that my aim is to educate ignorant fucks.  It is not my job to cry and bleed so that they can fucking evolve.”

rosi addresses many issues, her relationship with her mother, who rosi sometimes felt embarrassed by, because of her mother’s lack of assimilation into American culture; privilege; a desire to be white/internalized racism; becoming comfortable with her Asian identity; misogyny; animal rights, and more.  rosi writes about these topics very honestly and with so much anger, but amazingly, no bitterness.  It was very helpful and eye opening for me to read, as I struggle with many similar issues.

I think that, in addition to “just” being cathartic, zines such as this contribute to a person’s growth.  For a person of color to admit to themselves that they want/had wanted to be white is a huge thing, and to share that with someone else is so powerful.  Internalized racism is partnered with shame, and so to be able to open up and communicate about these issues, and learn that other people feel this way to, is a huge step to decolonizing the mind.

In “Proving Myself: as an Asian and as a Female” rosi shares the way her thoughts influence her actions.  For example, if a man notices them checking the oil level in her car, she will go buy oil and add some, just to show the man that, yes, she, a woman, knows how to replace her oil!  It seems that rosi has had her competency called into question so often that she feels the need to preemptively display her ability.  It is so unfortunate when we modify our behavior to suit or defy those people, because that means we are less free.  We think we are defying the bigotry, but really it is winning because we are still letting it control us.  rosi knows this, and as she noted, she offers no solutions, but it’s a big, wonderful deal to know you’re not alone in that struggle.

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CONTACT ROSI + ORDER NOT STRAIGHT NOT WHITE MALE

forthegreatergay.tumblr.com/ask

forthegreatergay@gmail.com

Order on Etsy

ORDERING NOTE FROM ROSI:

GEEEET IIIT:
- i won’t charge you if you live in vietnam.
- if you need a shipping option for your country added, let me know
- real-life friends, you don’t have to pay me, doopies.
- can’t afford it? wanna trade for your zines? message me
- if you want a pdf instead of a hard copy, message me before even adding it to you cart.
- infoshops, distros, galleries; let me know in what spaces you plan on hosting this zine

'NOT STRAIGHT NOT WHITE NOT MALE' CONTENTS

Hand-designed cover

Introduction note

And Ode to Chinkophiles: Y.e.l.l.o.w.F.e.v.e.r

Chauncey: This fucking guy” - a detailed account of the wildly inappropriate escapades of a middle-aged white man projecting his yellow fetish onto yours truly

I Have Discovered the Words with Which to Express my Visceral Resentment of White Cockiness” - where I bitterly examine my aesthetic inferiority complex
(^ and a follow-up clarification on the preceding essay)

Sorry, Mom” - being vietnamese-american in america can be fucking irritating..

Pre-Gay” - some things i want to say to old friends and family

But Really, Come On, You Surely Know By Now” - about the differences in expectations in ‘female’ attire and aesthetic and ‘male’ attire and aesthetic

Dysfunction Over Fashion” - how my boi-complex fucks with my wardrobe choices

Proving Myself: as an Asian and as a Female” - where I discuss, shortly, my relentless need to prove to everyone that I can be “better” than my stereotype
(^ and a follow-up clarification on the preceding essay)

Your Masculinity is Under Attack: In response to the new onslaught of ad campaigns that perpetuate sexism under the guise of ‘making fun of sexism through exaggeration’” - an obnoxious, satirical piece

A Documentation of Vocalized, 21st Century Gendered Bigotry” - where i list just a few months’ worth of sexist, patronizing remarks

A Documentation of Vocalized, 21st Century Racial Bigotry” - where i list some racist remarks I’ve received throughout my life

Not Asian Enough / Too Asian: month one - working in a Vietnamese restaurant couched in white O.C.

Broken” - a weird arty thing symbolizing South East Asian-American diasporic identity crises idk

E.S.L.” - short and dry. about my being a 1st generation American in my family and not understanding American customs

A/S/L? 13/M/CA” - a short essay about how i used to create online role-playing characters to live out my dreams and escape my identity

Don’t Tell Your Parents I Think They’re Racist: (unless I’ve asked you to)” - PSA to white allies. In summary, don’t decide for me when I should have race talks/race fights, and don’t decide for me which relationships I must now compromise for the “greater good”

White People Making White People Jokes” - where i discuss why i don’t think it’s always appropriate

Sup, Hypocrites” - shortly addressing skinny-shame, prude-shame, and femme-shame

Microcosms of Patriarchy” - hiding from the world in the radical scene does not mean hiding from non-consensual, intimate contact, unfortunately

Being Conscious of Womanhood” - an analysis of the unconscious things i do because i am hyper-aware of what it means to be a woman in this society

On Privilege, Allies, and Bitterness” - me listing and rambling for a page about the aforementioned topics

Cathartic Vomit” - me being pissed about this and that

comic relief

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COMMUNITY: Do you want to review zines for POCZP? Learn more about POCZP internship & volunteer opportunities here. We are still accepting applications. 

If you are interested in POCZP leading a workshop or other event in collaboration with your organization - worldwide - email poczineproject@gmail.com.

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

"I’m also really eager to see what People of Color (POC) Zine Project is bringing. They’re based out of the Bronx and do really important work in bringing non-whites to the forefront of zine communities. This is something that AZF Is highly lacking, and I really appreciate their presence this year."—Amanda Mills, co-founder and organizer of Atlanta Zine Fest

Source: clatl.com

Atlanta Zine Fest 2013

POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano will be tabling on behalf of POC Zine Project at the inaugural Atlanta Zine Fest on June 8 and 9. The table will feature a selection of POCZP zine partner titles, as well as some zines, art and jewelry by local ATL zinesters of color. <3

Be sure to stop by the POCZP table to purchase a fresh copy of Mixed Up! A zine about Mixed-Race Queer & Feminist Experience (you can read and download here for free as well), selections from Free Poet’s Press and be sure to get your issue of masConsumption before we run out of copies!

We’ll also have limited edition POCZP buttons for sale/trade! <3

Judith (see her latest call for submissions to Tom Girl zine here), a local POC zinester, will be tabling with POCZP in Atlanta.

Judith Jones is a writer, blogger, zinester and feminist. She contributes to the online magazine Inconnu and she blogs at Simple But Chic. She can be contacted at pigsthatfly.tumblr.com or simplebutchic247@gmail.com.

From Judith:
I will be bringing issue one and two of Tom Girl and artist trading cards. Also, I’ll bringing a few pieces of my dad’s jewelry to sell. It’s handmade. I’m  also bringing various button rings and earrings that I made by myself. 

POCZP will also be joined by Chantelle Kodua, an environmental enthusiast who enjoys working on various DIY projects in her spare time. When she isn’t out saving the world, by digging recyclables out of trash cans, she can be found spending copious hours on tumblr. She can be contacted at chantellephone.tumblr.com.

Daniela is attending Atlanta Zine Fest on behalf of POCZP to connect with the zine community and local zinesters/writers/publishers/artists of color in preparation for the POCZP tour date in Atlanta in October.

POCZP is sharing tabling space with local zinesters of color, as part of our advocacy to make zines by people of color easy to find, distribute and share.

If you are interested in collaborating with POCZP in Atlanta, contact poczineproject@gmail.com. We are especially interested in hearing from artists/zinesters/activists of color and white folks interested supporting POCZP’s efforts.

_____________________

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

ZINE SPOTLIGHT: Mixed Up! A Zine about Mixed-Race Queer & Feminist Experience [READ & DOWNLOAD]

Mixed Up! A Zine about Mixed-Race Queer & Feminist Experience

POCZP helped support the call for submissions to Mixed Up! A zine about Mixed-Race Queer & Feminist Experience last fall. We’ll be distributing copies at Atlanta Zine Fest this weekend <3

AUTHORS: Zine editors Lil Lefkowitz, Lee Naught & Lior and contributors to “Mixed Up!”

TUMBLR: http://mrqfzine.tumblr.com/

PUBLISHED: April 24, 2013

NOTE FROM LIOR TO POCZP:

Thanks so much for your email, and for uploading Mixed Up to your Issuu.  We’d love it if you made the zine available in whatever way you feel like! So totally feel free to post the printable, so folx can make and distribute their own. And, of course, if you wanna make copies and sell them, by all means!

READ ‘MIXED UP!’ NOW

POCZP’s mission is to make zines by people of color easy to find, distribute and share. In that spirit, we’ve added a readable version online that you can also download, courtesy of the “Mixed Up!” editors.

ORIGINAL ‘MIXED UP!’ CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Hey, mixed-race folks, how do you respond when you get asked what you are? Do you feel at a loss for words when trying to describe your racial, ethnic, or cultural background? Do you find yourself struggling to understand where you belong in the context of prominent racial paradigms? Do you run into a POC-white binary that is reductive, incomplete, or simply not enough? What does it mean that there often isn’t an easy answer? And what happens when you add gender, feminism, and queerness into the mix?

Hey, queers and feminists, let’s respond to the lack of representation of mixed-race folks like us.  Yes, we are deeply indebted to the countless beautiful queers and feminists of color who have demanded to be heard; who fight, survive, and die on a daily basis. We are indebted to colonized people and feminists of color around the world and in the states who have taught us that black and brown are beautiful; who have shown us how to act with compassion and love and thoughtful rage in the face of white supremacist violence. This zine is a call to continue this work; to build upon the work of anti-racist and decolonial literature, given the nuances of our lives as mixed-race queers and feminists, so often living on stolen land while refusing to forget the land stolen from our ancestors.

No doubt, racism against folks of color is fucking real, and those of us who are mixed race and sometimes or always pass as white are much less prone to the multiple forms of violence faced by black and brown folks. However, too often, that’s the end of the conversation. This zine strives to challenge the narrow conception of POC vs white, a binary which doesn’t allow space for many folks’ experiences or for more complex identities (even among POCs and white folks).

As mixed-raced queers and feminists, we refuse to whitewash our histories. We refuse to label individuals based solely upon our perceptions of their skin color or features. Colonialism attempts to whitewash, erase, assimilate and subjugate through violence and oppression.  We refuse to finish this work. We invite you to collectively participate in this refusal.

A Working Definition of Mixed-race: While this may not be the perfect term, we are using it to frame a very broad set of experiences and identities, which may include tracing all or part of one’s culture or heritage to brown people and colonized people, inclusive of all skin tones. This may also include being raised with multiple cultures or with immigrant experience.

Why Queers & Feminists? Not only are we interested in the ways that mixed-race folks’ identities interact with queerness and feminism, but we also believe that it is important to prioritize stories from queers and feminists, whose voices are often marginalized. Moreover, with a topic as broad as race, we want to anchor our discussions in some common politics. This anchor is important because it is a big part of how we (the editors) choose who to organize with, live with, form community with, fuck, and, in this case, write zines with.

Possible Topics: Privilege. [Not] Passing. Sex, relationships & dating. Conflicting and conflated identities (especially related to race and queerness, transness, feminism, class, dis/ability). The POC/white binary. Cultural appropriation. Structural and institutional oppression. Art, music & creativity. [Not] Belonging. Cultural estrangement. Immigrant experiences. Families & histories. Colonizing processes in family, work, activisms & relationships. Being too brown/not brown enough. Home. Diaspora. Performing identities. Physical manifestations of race, and intersection with other forms of identity and presentation. Preserving and paying respect to heritage & history (eg: interviews, oral histories, folklore). RememberingTracing origins and roots. The importance of race/ethnicity/culture to political formation. Mixed-race community. Food & recipes. Remedies. Developing new language(s). Race/religion overlap (and exclusion). And much, much more.

Media and formats: Poetry, prose, essay, visuals (B&W for zine, possibly color online), audio (for online), interviews, and other formats (pitch them to us!— we’re good catchers).

Deadline for submissions: Extended to January 15th, 2012.  Submit to mrqfzine [at] gmail [dot] com.

Contact:
mrqfzine [at] gmail [dot] com
www.mrqfzine.tumblr.com

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HELP DISTRIBUTE ‘MIXED! UP’ ZINE

Download a read-only and a PRINT version here, courtesy of the ‘Mixed Up!’ zine editors.

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

SPOTTED: POC Zine Project&#8217;s East Coast intern Cata in the South Bronx, preparing for D.C. Zine Fest!
Today Cata dropped by POCZP HQ in the South BX to pick up inventory for tabling at this year&#8217;s D.C. Zine Fest!
Be sure to support the fest and drop by our table, where Cata will have her own zines, as well as a selection of issues from our zine partners. Get a free poster and button and learn more about POC Zine Project!
D.C. ZINE FEST INFO
The 2012 DC Zinefest will be held on July 28th at St. Stephens Church (1525 Newton St. NW) from 11 am to 5&#160;pm. This event is free and open to the public.
Check out the Facebook invite for more information.
Photo description: POC Zine Project&#8217;s east coast intern Cata stands in front of a refrigerator at POCZP HQ in the South Bronx. She is holding POCZP founder Daniela&#8217;s latest mini-zine, &#8220;Cat Genie.&#8221; Cata is making a fierce face,revealing excitement. Behind her on the fridge is a poster from POCZP&#8217;s tour last year, as well as a poster from Midwest Zine Fest, where POCZP midwest coordinator Joyce Hatton was in attendance.
Photo by Daniela Capistrano
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DO YOU WANT TO SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT?
We are looking for representatives in every state, as well as regional  support, as we build toward the National POC Zinester &amp; Ally Conference/Convergence. Ideally you have some experience with organizing events and building community, but experience is not required. All are welcome. Priority will be given to people of color who apply but allies are definitely welcome.
Contact poczineproject@gmail.com for more details with “regional coordinator and internship info” as the subject line.
If you are outside the U.S. and want to be a part of our emerging POCZP Global Ambassadors program, email poczineproject@gmail.com as well to stay informed as opportunities arise.
SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT
If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.
DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

SPOTTED: POC Zine Project’s East Coast intern Cata in the South Bronx, preparing for D.C. Zine Fest!

Today Cata dropped by POCZP HQ in the South BX to pick up inventory for tabling at this year’s D.C. Zine Fest!

Be sure to support the fest and drop by our table, where Cata will have her own zines, as well as a selection of issues from our zine partners. Get a free poster and button and learn more about POC Zine Project!

D.C. ZINE FEST INFO

The 2012 DC Zinefest will be held on July 28th at St. Stephens Church (1525 Newton St. NW) from 11 am to 5 pm. This event is free and open to the public.

Check out the Facebook invite for more information.

Photo description: POC Zine Project’s east coast intern Cata stands in front of a refrigerator at POCZP HQ in the South Bronx. She is holding POCZP founder Daniela’s latest mini-zine, “Cat Genie.” Cata is making a fierce face,revealing excitement. Behind her on the fridge is a poster from POCZP’s tour last year, as well as a poster from Midwest Zine Fest, where POCZP midwest coordinator Joyce Hatton was in attendance.

Photo by Daniela Capistrano

———-

DO YOU WANT TO SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT?

We are looking for representatives in every state, as well as regional  support, as we build toward the National POC Zinester & Ally Conference/Convergence. Ideally you have some experience with organizing events and building community, but experience is not required. All are welcome. Priority will be given to people of color who apply but allies are definitely welcome.

Contact poczineproject@gmail.com for more details with “regional coordinator and internship info” as the subject line.

If you are outside the U.S. and want to be a part of our emerging POCZP Global Ambassadors program, email poczineproject@gmail.com as well to stay informed as opportunities arise.

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS for POC centered Zine Distro by Nyky Gomez, creator of Skinned Heart zine

POCZP featured Skinned Heart back in 2012 and added it to the archive. We are thrilled to learn that another POC-run distro has emerged (check out People of the Sun Distro and SlushPilePress as well). We look forward to exploring ways to support Nyky’s efforts <3

FROM NYKY

Hey Followers,

After many years of writing a zine, buying zines, trading zines and observing zine culture I have decided to start a zine distro! Recently I was browsing distros all over the internet looking for zines pertaining to Women of Color and found that we are seriously under represented in many of the zine distros despite the fact that there are enough zines created by women of color and gender-marginalized POC to present in zine distros. I was frustrated about going through pages and pages of catalogs of zines and finding only a handful of zine, most of which I had. I went through my zines and found so many zines written by POC that were not being distributed.

After being frustrated about this I decided I wanted to create a distro dedicated to our struggles, our projects, our zines. Zine culture is not white culture. D.I.Y. culture is not white culture. Punk is not inherently white culture. So in the spirit of resistance, in the spirit of visibility and in the spirit of celebrating our cultures and intersectionality: Brown Recluse Zine Distro.

Currently I am looking for zines written by POC from all walks of life and gender identities and expressions. I am looking for personal zines, political zines, punk zines, sex worker zines, zines about gender and feminism (No 101 zines plz), zines about racism and self determination, anti oppression, zines written by Indigenous and First Nations people , sobriety and harm reduction (no hateful content towards substance users), traveling zines and zines about self-care and accountability. I will not be carrying art or poetry zines. I may eventually carry zines written by white folks, but I ask that white folks not submit their zines as I will contact people with zines that I am interested in.

Please send me links to zines that you think that I should carry. Please do not send me PDF’s or links to zines available only online. Send me a quick note about yourself and your wholesale price (50% of retail price).

Please send your zine submissions to:

Nyky Gomez

PO BOX 80582

Seattle, WA 98108

corazonpelado@gmail.com

SIGNAL BOOST!!!!

Besos y Abrazos,

nykyG

COMMUNITY: Do you know of other POC run/created distros (past and emerging)? PLEASE send info to poczineproject@gmail.com. We want to share an ongoing collaborative list online so that folks can easily access this information. Thanks. xo PLEASE SIGNAL BOOST.

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Editor’s Note: A Community Submission OR Call for Submissions post is usually from POC folk submitting their own zine or zine call to be featured by POCZP. If you would like to share your zine with the POC Zine Project community, here’s how to do it.

When you submit your zine, feel free to add some background, a description of your work and art and your mission statement. If you just send us the name of your zine, we’ll simply link back to a source for purchasing it and use the language you already have on your site.

Please make sure to include pertinent info for CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: deadline, submission info/email/tumblr, related links, your own bio, etc.

As long as the zine was created/co-created by a person of color, we will always share Community Submissions. Enjoy!

POCZP also accepts anonymous submissions and zine donations from POC. Click here for submission guidelines.

Basically, I think y’all are doing awesome work and I am honored to be able to support the project in whatever way I can. - Sarah McCarry, Guillotine creator & POCZP fundraiser

COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT: Much love and many thanks to Sarah McCarry, who is donating all proceeds from the Guillotine #4 special edition presale to the 2013 Race Riot! Tour fund. Woo! xo

Announcement from Sarah:

I cannot even TELL YOU in the LANGUAGE OF WORDS how excited I am to be publishing Mimi Thi Nguyen and Golnar Nikpour’s conversation on punk. No lie, friends, this chapbook is going to melt the fuck right off your face. You can preorder it now; it’ll ship in mid-June. Use the discount code PUNKSNOTDEAD for $2 off your order between now and May 31. All the proceeds from the special edition will benefit the POC Zine Project’s Race Riot! 2013 tour.

This collaboration is beautiful to us on multiple levels: Mimi was instrumental in making the first Race Riot! tour a success last year and will be joining us again this year. Golnar is an inspiration to POCZP and she performed at the first Race Riot! tour event in Brooklyn with her band In School.

MORE INFO

Guillotine is an ongoing series of handbound chapbooks with letterpress-printed covers, and each chapbook is a single essay.

"Punk is a moving target": Punk is an unwieldy object of study—because of fictions that circulate as truth, absences in archives and the questionable subject of recovery, and the passage of “minor” details into fields of knowledge. A conversation about the politics of methodology, and historiography, of subculture. 32 pp., 4.5 x 6.5". ***SHIPS IN JUNE 2013, 243 IN STOCK***

MIMI THI NGUYEN is an Associate Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies and Asian American Studies at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign and the author of The Gift of Freedom. She has made zines since 1991, including Slander and the compilation zine Race Riot. Nguyen is a former Punk Planet columnist and a Maximum Rocknrollshitworker; she is also a frequent collaborator with Daniela Capistrano for the POC Zine Project.

GOLNAR NIKPOUR served as co-coordinator of Maximum Rocknrollbetween 2004 and 2007. She is also a founding editor of B|ta’arof, a magazine featuring art, literature, historiography, and cultural critique related to Iran and its diaspora. She was born in Tehran, Iran, and lives in New York City.

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

airhornoftruthandlove:

I thought I noticed a trend regarding images of people on zine fest posters, so I googled “zine fest poster” and here is what I feel is an accurate sampling of what I saw:
Midwest Zine Fest   Appears to be a white woman.
One of the LA Zine Fest posters.  Appears to be a white woman.
Paper City in Melbourne.  Appears to be a white young woman.
One of the Brooklyn Zine Fest posters.  Appears to be a white woman.
Birmingham Zine Fest  Appears to be a large community of exclusively white people.
Belgium Feminism Fest?  Appears to be women of color represented equally with white women.
I’m not a fan of putting people on posters, for many reasons. It sends unintentional messages that often alienate people.
When a decision is made to use images of people on posters, I appreciate when there are alternate, person-free posters used as well. If I want to support the project by taking a couple of flyers or posters to give to friends, I want to be able to give them one I don’t have to apologize for. And if images of people are used on posters, I do like it when it’s cartoony, rather than representational. The picture here, from Chicago Zine Fest 2011, is adorable. It shows people somewhere with many skin tones, even purple! And all the people in this fanciful place are the same. Whether they are young or old, purple or orange, they have the same love for reading zines! 

Excellent analysis by POCZP Midwest Coordinator Joyce Hatton &lt;3
We&#8217;d love to see more white folks who organize events factor in how representations of people at their events on materiality (physical and in digital form) both welcome and alienate POC.
A facet of white privilege is just assuming everyone is OK with an entire event being represented by a white person on a poster. That is no bueno. If you want more POC to attend your events, make your promotional materials more inclusive.

airhornoftruthandlove:

I thought I noticed a trend regarding images of people on zine fest posters, so I googled “zine fest poster” and here is what I feel is an accurate sampling of what I saw:

Midwest Zine Fest
Appears to be a white woman.

One of the LA Zine Fest posters.
Appears to be a white woman.

Paper City in Melbourne.
Appears to be a white young woman.

One of the Brooklyn Zine Fest posters.
Appears to be a white woman.

Birmingham Zine Fest
Appears to be a large community of exclusively white people.

Belgium Feminism Fest?
Appears to be women of color represented equally with white women.

I’m not a fan of putting people on posters, for many reasons. It sends unintentional messages that often alienate people.

When a decision is made to use images of people on posters, I appreciate when there are alternate, person-free posters used as well. If I want to support the project by taking a couple of flyers or posters to give to friends, I want to be able to give them one I don’t have to apologize for.

And if images of people are used on posters, I do like it when it’s cartoony, rather than representational. The picture here, from Chicago Zine Fest 2011, is adorable. It shows people somewhere with many skin tones, even purple! And all the people in this fanciful place are the same. Whether they are young or old, purple or orange, they have the same love for reading zines!

Excellent analysis by POCZP Midwest Coordinator Joyce Hatton <3

We’d love to see more white folks who organize events factor in how representations of people at their events on materiality (physical and in digital form) both welcome and alienate POC.

A facet of white privilege is just assuming everyone is OK with an entire event being represented by a white person on a poster. That is no bueno. If you want more POC to attend your events, make your promotional materials more inclusive.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: ‘nin,’ a new journal of erotic poetics devoted to exploring sex and the body through language

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: August 1, 2013

RELEASE DATE: September 2013

CONTACT: ninjournal@gmail.com

From nin's Tumblr:

welcome to nin, a journal of erotic poetics devoted to exploring sex and the body through language.

nin is currently accepting submissions for its inaugural issue in september 2013. please click on the SUBMIT tab for instructions on how to send us your work. submissions close august 1.

nin will appear in both print and digital formats. for more information about the journal and the motivations behind it, please click on the ABOUT tab.

check back here often for inspiration of the erotic (and nsfw) kind. nin’s primary goal is not to titillate, but if it is provocative and well written/produced, this is a common side effect. this does not mean that we overlook the raunchy. in fact, it might be our favorite.

finally, nin is run by queers, and is devoted to representing all sexualities, gender expressions and ethnicities in our publication. you are encouraged to submit if you are non-native, gay, lesbian, bisexual, pansexual, queer, genderqueer, transgender and/or a person of color.

we look forward to receiving your work.

COMMUNITY: We encourage people of color of all backgrounds to submit to nin and other publicationsas we need more records of more expressions of sexuality and gender from POC around the world—in OUR voices. xo