POC ZINE PROJECT

Posts tagged racism

ZINE SPOTLIGHT: How to Stage a Coup [NOW AVAILABLE ONLINE AND FOR DISTRO]

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Earlier this year Helen Luu donated her original flat for How to Stage a Coup: An Insurrection of the Underground Liberation Army (2000) to POCZP, which we scanned just in time for POCZP’s participation at Allied Media Conference in Detroit.

Yes, it’s here!!!

READ & SHARE ‘HOW TO STAGE A COUP’

POCZP’s mission is to make zines by people of color easy to find, distribute and share. We are thrilled to share this legacy zine with the world in digital form and will be providing (sliding-scale priced) print copies at all Race Riot! tour events this fall.

HTSAC will be free for all POC attendees at Race Riot! tour events.

***This zine is best viewed online or via mobile in full-screen mode***

TITLE: How to Stage a Coup: An Insurrection of the Underground Liberation Army 

EDITOR: Helen Luu

PUBLISHED: 2000

DESCRIPTION BY POCZP TOUR MEMBER MIMI THI NGUYEN IN 2000:

Helen Luu recently edited a compilation zine called How To Stage A Coup, aimed at creating a dialogue among people of color involved in subcultural pursuits (including punk rock) around race, racism and politics. Contributors like Lauren Martin (You Might As Well Live, Quantify), Lynn Hou (Cyanide), Celia Prez (I Dreamed I Was Assertive), Elizabeth Martinez (Colorlines) and Vincent Chung address a wide variety of issues from organizing and identity politics, to activist dynamics and punk rock betrayals. What does it mean to look at the photographs of Third World suffering on the covers of grindcore records? What does it mean to talk about “pride”? Where was the “color” in Seattle/WTO? What comes first – “being brown or being famous”? The contributors to this compilation ask important questions that need asking, again and again, and Helen Luu brings it all together. 

Click here for the rest of Mimi’s interview, and check out Helen’s DJ projects as MissRuckus.

DO YOU WANT TO DISTRO ‘HOW TO STAGE A COUP’?

We announced on our Facebook page that we have two digital downloads available:

1) Print version

This version was made from a scan of the original flat. It was created with the intention of sharing with folks for distribution of the print version.

2) Read-version

This is the online-friendly version you can see in the embed above. This file is best viewed in e-readers or printed with the expectation that it will be page by page and not the same as the flat.

HOW TO ACCESS HTSAC FILES

We’re raising funds to make 200+ print versions of How to Stage a Coup to give away during tour, so we’re asking folks interested in gaining access to either files to email poczineproject@gmail.com with information about how they plan to use it.

Based on that info (and our relationship with that person/collective), we will ask for a sliding scale donation in exchange for access to a secure file.

We will be providing free access to both downloads on a case-by-case basis. In the meantime, enjoy the read-only version above.

We look forward to seeing more copies of How to Stage a Coup in circulation and on shelves in venues/zine libraries/archives worldwide! 

Please note that, per Luu’s donation statement, "This zine and the parts within it are not to be used for profit (paying for expenses is okay though)."

We’ll have more details about who follows up to distro and archive How to Stage a Coup in the coming weeks and months. 

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

ZINE SPOTLIGHT: Not Straight Not White Not Male

NOT STRAIGHT NOT WHITE NOT MALE

TITLE: Not Straight Not White Male

AUTHOR: rosi

ORIGIN: Los Angeles, USA

RELEASE: December, 2012

DESCRIPTION BY AUTHOR:

I wrote this zine because there is a lack of media that I can really, truly relate to. It is glaringly obvious that this radical scene is comprised mostly of heteros, of whites, and of males. I am Asian, I am hella gay, and I am female.

Disclaimer: I wrote this for me a lot more than I wrote it for you. There is a lack of solution offering, and at the same time a lot rambling, because it is cathartic for me. It is highly anecdotal; I write from experience. Don’t assume that my aim is to educate ignorant fucks. It is not my job to cry and bleed so that they can fucking evolve.

Always for the greater gay,
xROSIx

ROSI, IN HER OWN WORDS:

I am Vietnamese-American, female and hella gay (also vegan, straightedge, intersectional-feminist, anti-theist/agnostic and non-pacifist). So this is written from that perspective.

POCZP REVIEWS ‘NOT STRAIGHT NOT WHITE NOT MALE’

By Joyce Hatton, POCZP Midwest Coordinator

Yesterday I was leaving the gym with a friend of mine, and we were debating the existence of the “Lobster and Lefse Festival.”  I said “But it’s a whole weekend! How can you make a whole weekend out of lobster and lefse?!”  Two older white women started chatting with us and assured us that it was a real thing, and yes, it was a weekend long.  It was a friendly chat until one woman said “Here in North Dakota we can make a weekend out of anything,” and suddenly my friend and I weren’t laughing.

It hurts when people assume that I’m not from here, that their culture is not my culture.  It burns, because I know the only reason they think that is because I’m black.  I am steeped in Uff da culture, this is my home, but I am always treated as in outsider in my home.

I recently read “Not Straight Not White Not Male” by rosi, and it was a balm to my irritated soul.  In the disclaimer she said “I wrote this for me a lot more than I wrote it for you.  There is a lack of solution offering and at the same time a lot of rambling, because it is cathartic for me. Don’t assume that my aim is to educate ignorant fucks.  It is not my job to cry and bleed so that they can fucking evolve.”

rosi addresses many issues, her relationship with her mother, who rosi sometimes felt embarrassed by, because of her mother’s lack of assimilation into American culture; privilege; a desire to be white/internalized racism; becoming comfortable with her Asian identity; misogyny; animal rights, and more.  rosi writes about these topics very honestly and with so much anger, but amazingly, no bitterness.  It was very helpful and eye opening for me to read, as I struggle with many similar issues.

I think that, in addition to “just” being cathartic, zines such as this contribute to a person’s growth.  For a person of color to admit to themselves that they want/had wanted to be white is a huge thing, and to share that with someone else is so powerful.  Internalized racism is partnered with shame, and so to be able to open up and communicate about these issues, and learn that other people feel this way to, is a huge step to decolonizing the mind.

In “Proving Myself: as an Asian and as a Female” rosi shares the way her thoughts influence her actions.  For example, if a man notices them checking the oil level in her car, she will go buy oil and add some, just to show the man that, yes, she, a woman, knows how to replace her oil!  It seems that rosi has had her competency called into question so often that she feels the need to preemptively display her ability.  It is so unfortunate when we modify our behavior to suit or defy those people, because that means we are less free.  We think we are defying the bigotry, but really it is winning because we are still letting it control us.  rosi knows this, and as she noted, she offers no solutions, but it’s a big, wonderful deal to know you’re not alone in that struggle.

—————————————

CONTACT ROSI + ORDER NOT STRAIGHT NOT WHITE MALE

forthegreatergay.tumblr.com/ask

forthegreatergay@gmail.com

Order on Etsy

ORDERING NOTE FROM ROSI:

GEEEET IIIT:
- i won’t charge you if you live in vietnam.
- if you need a shipping option for your country added, let me know
- real-life friends, you don’t have to pay me, doopies.
- can’t afford it? wanna trade for your zines? message me
- if you want a pdf instead of a hard copy, message me before even adding it to you cart.
- infoshops, distros, galleries; let me know in what spaces you plan on hosting this zine

'NOT STRAIGHT NOT WHITE NOT MALE' CONTENTS

Hand-designed cover

Introduction note

And Ode to Chinkophiles: Y.e.l.l.o.w.F.e.v.e.r

Chauncey: This fucking guy” - a detailed account of the wildly inappropriate escapades of a middle-aged white man projecting his yellow fetish onto yours truly

I Have Discovered the Words with Which to Express my Visceral Resentment of White Cockiness” - where I bitterly examine my aesthetic inferiority complex
(^ and a follow-up clarification on the preceding essay)

Sorry, Mom” - being vietnamese-american in america can be fucking irritating..

Pre-Gay” - some things i want to say to old friends and family

But Really, Come On, You Surely Know By Now” - about the differences in expectations in ‘female’ attire and aesthetic and ‘male’ attire and aesthetic

Dysfunction Over Fashion” - how my boi-complex fucks with my wardrobe choices

Proving Myself: as an Asian and as a Female” - where I discuss, shortly, my relentless need to prove to everyone that I can be “better” than my stereotype
(^ and a follow-up clarification on the preceding essay)

Your Masculinity is Under Attack: In response to the new onslaught of ad campaigns that perpetuate sexism under the guise of ‘making fun of sexism through exaggeration’” - an obnoxious, satirical piece

A Documentation of Vocalized, 21st Century Gendered Bigotry” - where i list just a few months’ worth of sexist, patronizing remarks

A Documentation of Vocalized, 21st Century Racial Bigotry” - where i list some racist remarks I’ve received throughout my life

Not Asian Enough / Too Asian: month one - working in a Vietnamese restaurant couched in white O.C.

Broken” - a weird arty thing symbolizing South East Asian-American diasporic identity crises idk

E.S.L.” - short and dry. about my being a 1st generation American in my family and not understanding American customs

A/S/L? 13/M/CA” - a short essay about how i used to create online role-playing characters to live out my dreams and escape my identity

Don’t Tell Your Parents I Think They’re Racist: (unless I’ve asked you to)” - PSA to white allies. In summary, don’t decide for me when I should have race talks/race fights, and don’t decide for me which relationships I must now compromise for the “greater good”

White People Making White People Jokes” - where i discuss why i don’t think it’s always appropriate

Sup, Hypocrites” - shortly addressing skinny-shame, prude-shame, and femme-shame

Microcosms of Patriarchy” - hiding from the world in the radical scene does not mean hiding from non-consensual, intimate contact, unfortunately

Being Conscious of Womanhood” - an analysis of the unconscious things i do because i am hyper-aware of what it means to be a woman in this society

On Privilege, Allies, and Bitterness” - me listing and rambling for a page about the aforementioned topics

Cathartic Vomit” - me being pissed about this and that

comic relief

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COMMUNITY: Do you want to review zines for POCZP? Learn more about POCZP internship & volunteer opportunities here. We are still accepting applications. 

If you are interested in POCZP leading a workshop or other event in collaboration with your organization - worldwide - email poczineproject@gmail.com.

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

Three-year anniversary statement
Imagine that your path to self actualization is like crossing a rushing, dangerous river — and the only way to get across is by accessing stepping stones in the water. Now, pretend that each of those stones is a form of media you reference in your daily life. You will see that certain people are drawn to certain stones. Different variables create inequality, which informs progress (or lack of).You’ll see how some people, particularly white people invested in keeping people of color from moving forward, prevent a lot of self actualizing from happening. You’ll see it in real time and in the history of this river (life).POC Zine Project is about cultivating stepping stones — points of cultural reference — for people of color to utilize and draw strength & healing from on their path. 

We are here to disrupt. We’re connecting people to life lines. We’re empowering people of color to create new maps for self actualization, while identifying existing ones.We’re both educating and learning from allies, who evolve along with us.From this paradigm, you will begin to understand why POCZP is an experiment in activism and community through materiality, and why we are committed to being a space of healing for people of color.Through the duration of this project, we will change all the time, because our community is changing all the time. We are growing, learning, collaborating and thriving — all the time. We are constantly observing, assessing, reflecting, revising and evolving. We both live inside academia and in direct opposition to it. We embrace our existence as a blessed bundle of contradictions devoted to supporting self actualization and liberation for POC. After three years at this, we are proud to declare it:We are POC Zine Project and our mission is to make zines by people of color easy to find, distribute and share. We are an experiment in activism and community through materiality, and function as an advocacy platform and incubator for liberation.Thank you for your support.
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ABOUT THE RACE RIOT! TOUR
POC Zine Project held its first Race Riot! Tour in 2012, producing 20 events in 14 cities, which included speaking engagements at six universities. Click here to view photos from the POC Zine Project: 2012 Race Riot! Tour tour finale at Death By Audio in Brooklyn and access all the tour stop recaps.
STAY INFORMED
We will be taking the Race Riot! Tour through 14 more cities in 2013. Stay tuned!
Facebook.com/POCZineProject
Twitter.com/poczineproject
poczineproject.tumblr.com
SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT
If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour and the poverty zine series.
DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh
You can also send well-concealed cash or a check! Email daniela@dcapmedia.com for details or if you have questions.
Info about the poverty zine series: http://bit.ly/RLVTVt
<3,
POC Zine Project

Three-year anniversary statement

Imagine that your path to self actualization is like crossing a rushing, dangerous river — and the only way to get across is by accessing stepping stones in the water. 

Now, pretend that each of those stones is a form of media you reference in your daily life. You will see that certain people are drawn to certain stones. Different variables create inequality, which informs progress (or lack of).

You’ll see how some people, particularly white people invested in keeping people of color from moving forward, prevent a lot of self actualizing from happening. You’ll see it in real time and in the history of this river (life).

POC Zine Project is about cultivating stepping stones — points of cultural reference — for people of color to utilize and draw strength & healing from on their path. 

Rushing River

We are here to disrupt. 

We’re connecting people to life lines. 

We’re empowering people of color to create new maps for self actualization, while identifying existing ones.

We’re both educating and learning from allies, who evolve along with us.

From this paradigm, you will begin to understand why POCZP is an experiment in activism and community through materiality, and why we are committed to being a space of healing for people of color.

Through the duration of this project, we will change all the time, because our community is changing all the time. We are growing, learning, collaborating and thriving — all the time. We are constantly observing, assessing, reflecting, revising and evolving. 

We both live inside academia and in direct opposition to it. 

We embrace our existence as a blessed bundle of contradictions devoted to supporting self actualization and liberation for POC. 

After three years at this, we are proud to declare it:

We are POC Zine Project and our mission is to make zines by people of color easy to find, distribute and share. 

We are an experiment in activism and community through materiality, and function as an advocacy platform and incubator for liberation.

Thank you for your support.

———————————————————

ABOUT THE RACE RIOT! TOUR

POC Zine Project held its first Race Riot! Tour in 2012, producing 20 events in 14 cities, which included speaking engagements at six universities. Click here to view photos from the POC Zine Project: 2012 Race Riot! Tour tour finale at Death By Audio in Brooklyn and access all the tour stop recaps.

STAY INFORMED

We will be taking the Race Riot! Tour through 14 more cities in 2013. Stay tuned!

Facebook.com/POCZineProject

Twitter.com/poczineproject

poczineproject.tumblr.com

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

You can also send well-concealed cash or a check! Email daniela@dcapmedia.com for details or if you have questions.

Info about the poverty zine series: http://bit.ly/RLVTVt

<3,

POC Zine Project

DONATION SPOTLIGHT: Helen Luu’s original flat for How to Stage a Coup: An Insurrection of the Underground Liberation Army (2000)

Big thanks to Helen Luu for donating her original flat to POC Zine Project.

POCZP is in the process of scanning and will make this zine available as a free digital download and embed. We will have copies for sale and trade at all our events in 2013.

If you are interested in helping to distro this zine and want early access to the digital version, send us a message.

If you’re not familiar with Helen Luu , check out Mimi’s interview with her shortly after the zine’s release. Here’s an excerpt:

HeartAttaCk columnist and activist Helen Luu recently edited a compilation zine called How To Stage A Coup, aimed at creating a dialogue among people of color involved in subcultural pursuits (including punk rock) around race, racism and politics.

Contributors like Lauren Martin (You Might As Well Live, Quantify), Lynn Hou (Cyanide), Celia Prez (I Dreamed I Was Assertive), Elizabeth Martinez (Colorlines) and Vincent Chung address a wide variety of issues from organizing and identity politics, to activist dynamics and punk rock betrayals.

What does it mean to look at the photographs of Third World suffering on the covers of grindcore records? What does it mean to talk about “pride”? Where was the “color” in Seattle/WTO? What comes first – “being brown or being famous”?

The contributors to this compilation ask important questions that need asking, again and again, and Helen Luu brings it all together.

Interview by Mimi Nguyen.

How did HTSAC come together, conceptually and practically?

I’ve been doing zines for a few years now and because of this, have also read a lot of zines and corresponded with lots of people. I started noticing that some zine kids have some really fucked-up notions about issues like racism and that zine culture, like punk rock, is mostly this sea of white – not only in terms of people but also in terms of ideas and ideology and perspectives and that sort of thing.

At the same time though, I would sometimes come across amazing zines by kick-ass people of color with really great critical commentary on race. One day, into my lap fell Evolution of a Race Riot, which was this compilation zine put together over a number of years by you, and which was filled with writings and art by some amazing people of color. It was hands down the most inspiring and empowering zine I had ever read, because this was the first thing I had ever encountered that was about us, by us, and for us, on our own terms.

And it was this collection of voices from all over North America who might not even have otherwise known about each other were it not for the zine.

I am proud to say that HTSAC is in the spirit of Evolution of a Race Riot because our fire ain’t gonna die down! To all our misguided friends and enemies: be very very afraid. As people of color, we need to build on and continue positive projects like Evolution of a Race Riot.

I felt that it was important that HTSAC be by, for, and about people of color because a lot of us want to engage in a different kind of discourse. A lot of us are really sick and tired of constantly having to play the role of “educator” to white people who just don’t get it, and who instead accuse us of “reverse discrimination,” of being “too angry,” of being “ungrateful immigrants” because they feel that their positions of white privilege and power might be threatened.

So anyway, I just started putting out the word about the zine, making the call for contributions, and when I finally decided to get my shit together and stop putting it off, I started nagging people more for submissions and they just started to pour in.

Click here for the rest of Mimi’s interview with Helen, and check out her DJ projects as MissRuckus. If you’re in or near Toronto on the 25th, drop by Helen’s birthday bash at KITCH!

How to stage a coup

- Portland, OR, 2010: Shotgun Seamstress creator Osa Atoe holds up a copy of How to Stage a Coup, while meeting with Daniela for the first time during the Portland Zine Symposium. POCZP tabled at the fest and sponsored Osa’s zine release party.

Photo by POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano.

VIDEO: Race Riot! Tour - Oct 6, 2012 - Cristy C. Road reads from Spit and Passion

This clip is part two of five of a video documenting POC Zine Project’s multimedia reading and discussion at the University of Maryland on Oct 6, 2012. The event took place at the Women’s Studies Multimedia Studio.

In this segment (second half), Cristy C. Road reads excerpts from her new graphic memoir, Spit and Passion, out now on Feminist Press.

Editor’s note: If you liked this video, subscribe or bookmark the POC Zine Project YouTube channel. We’ll be sharing ad-free videos every week.

ABOUT THE RACE RIOT! TOUR

POC Zine Project held it’s first-ever Race Riot! Tour, producing 20 events in 14 cities, which included speaking engagements at six universities. Our time at the University of Maryland was part of the tour. Click here to view photos from the POC Zine Project: 2012 Race Riot! Tour tour finale at Death By Audio in Brooklyn and access all the tour stop recaps.

ABOUT POC ZINE PROJECT

POC Zine Project’s mission is to makes ALL zines by POC (People of Color) easy to find, distribute and share. We are an experiment in activism and community through materiality.

STAY INFORMED

We will be taking the Race Riot! tour through 14 more cities in 2013. Stay tuned! Facebook.com/POCZineProject

Twitter.com/poczineproject

poczineproject.tumblr.com

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for the 2013 poverty zine series. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to publishing and distribution costs.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

You can also send well-concealed cash or a check! Email daniela@dcapmedia.com for details or if you have questions.

Info about the poverty zine series: http://bit.ly/RLVTVt

———

Video documentation made possible by Reed Bonnet (thanks for recording!) Check out his work: http://vimeo.com/reedbonnet/

Big thanks once again to Sine Hwang Jensen, a member of MOONROOT Collective who agreed to be our local tour organizer after we met her at the Bmore Feminist BBQ Series in August of 2012. 

Another big thank you to Melissa Rogers at the University of Maryland and Jarah Moesch from Digital Cultures & Creativity.


ZINE SPOTLIGHT: Race Riot 2 [NOW AVAILABLE AS A FREE DIGITAL ZINE!]
CREATOR: Mimi Thi Nguyen
RELEASE: 2002
DESCRIPTION: Mimi Thi Nguyen’s Evolution of a Race Riot (1997) is a huge compilation zine featuring writers of color who are affiliated with the punk and riot grrrl scenes. The pieces analyze racism, and privilege in the largely white populations of activist, feminist, punk and zine communities, and discuss isolation and homogeneity. There are articles and comics by American Indians, Asian Americans, African Americans, Filipinos, and Latinos.
The second issue of the compilation series, Race Riot 2, was released in 2002.
Thanks to a donation from POCZP member Mimi Thi Nguyen, POC Zine Project was able to scan Race Riot 2 and make it available online as a free e-zine.
Here is Race Riot 2's digital debut, enjoy! &lt;3

You can purchase print copies of both zines at POC Zine Project events in 2013, as well as through our allies, For The Birds Feminist Collective + Distro.
If you haven&#8217;t already read Evolution of a Race Riot (issue one in the compilation series), we&#8217;ve got you covered. Yup, we scanned it in 2011! Enjoy it below:

We&#8217;re thrilled that the Evolution of a Race Riot digital zine was read over 7,000 times so far &lt;3 We hope that people continue to read and share Race Riot #1 and #2, now that we&#8217;ve made both available to access online.
POC Zine Project&#8217;s mission is to make zines by people of color easy to find, distribute, and share. We&#8217;re an experiment in activism and community through materiality.
EDITOR&#8217;S NOTE: The original Race Riot 2 included an extensive, if partial, project directory of zines past and present made by people of color (not included in the above digital zine). POC Zine Project will release the Race Riot Project Directory as a free digital zine in 2013.

ZINE SPOTLIGHT: Race Riot 2 [NOW AVAILABLE AS A FREE DIGITAL ZINE!]

CREATOR: Mimi Thi Nguyen

RELEASE: 2002

DESCRIPTION: Mimi Thi Nguyen’s Evolution of a Race Riot (1997) is a huge compilation zine featuring writers of color who are affiliated with the punk and riot grrrl scenes. The pieces analyze racism, and privilege in the largely white populations of activist, feminist, punk and zine communities, and discuss isolation and homogeneity. There are articles and comics by American Indians, Asian Americans, African Americans, Filipinos, and Latinos.

The second issue of the compilation series, Race Riot 2, was released in 2002.

Thanks to a donation from POCZP member Mimi Thi Nguyen, POC Zine Project was able to scan Race Riot 2 and make it available online as a free e-zine.

Here is Race Riot 2's digital debut, enjoy! <3

You can purchase print copies of both zines at POC Zine Project events in 2013, as well as through our allies, For The Birds Feminist Collective + Distro.

If you haven’t already read Evolution of a Race Riot (issue one in the compilation series), we’ve got you covered. Yup, we scanned it in 2011! Enjoy it below:

We’re thrilled that the Evolution of a Race Riot digital zine was read over 7,000 times so far <3 We hope that people continue to read and share Race Riot #1 and #2, now that we’ve made both available to access online.

POC Zine Project’s mission is to make zines by people of color easy to find, distribute, and share. We’re an experiment in activism and community through materiality.

EDITOR’S NOTE: The original Race Riot 2 included an extensive, if partial, project directory of zines past and present made by people of color (not included in the above digital zine). POC Zine Project will release the Race Riot Project Directory as a free digital zine in 2013.

POC Zine Project and Tonya L. Jones respond to Portland State Vanguard's article on zines

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

On November 12, 2012, Portland State University student Robin Crowell published an interview with Tonya L. Jones on PSU University’s Vanguard site. Tonya, the founder of the Women of Color Zine Workshops (and WOC Zine Symposium) based in Portland, OR, shared her thoughts with Robin on how “zines give voice to social justice” (what was used in the original headline).

POC Zine Project read the interview and — having a relationship with Tonya — suspected that some details didn’t make the edit. Also, Tonya and another person were misquoted.

WHY WE’RE PUBLISHING THIS RESPONSE

We definitely don’t want to discourage campus publications from covering poc zine-related topics. We are not about bashing student journalists. People make mistakes.

However, it is important to us that editors make it a priority to (when possible) include comments by interviewees addressing their experiences with racial inequality.

It’s also equally important for writers to have the ability to assess when edits to their work compromise the piece in ways that spread misinformation, or prevent important information from being shared.

We don’t know who made the final call on what did or didn’t get published, but we do want to raise awareness about two very important errors:

EXAMPLE #1: Tonya emailed this to Robin as part of her email interview, but it didn’t make it in the piece:

Some of us use our zines to write about our experiences as WOC and to deconstruct oppression in their lives. But, just like other zinesters, we like to talk about our different interests (e.g. music, knitting, cooking, traveling, pets etc.). We are no different (as artists) in many ways, yet we do offer unique history/stories to share as WOC.

Anyone involved in zine culture should have work by WOC zinesters in their collection.

Why were these two paragraphs cut? This information - in our opinion - seems like the heart and soul of Tonya’s motivations, and these facts should have been included in the article.

EXAMPLE #2: It’s important to be correct about things such as accurately publishing quotes. This is how history is unintentionally revised and people are misrepresented.

Sugene Yang-Kelly was misquoted. Here is the excerpt from the piece: 

Sugene Yang-Kelly views making a zine as a “self-indulgent” activity.

“It’s just a fun, personal outlet, and I’m not trying to reach a wide audience or impress anyone or change people’s minds,” Yang-Kelly said. “It’s a bonus if other people want to read my zines and have a conversation about it.”

Here is what she really meant, directly from Sugene:

I did not say that I thought zines were a self-indulgent activity, I said that it was self indulgent for ME. And I did not write an article that got censored, it was a different article that got censored. And we did NOT end up publishing and distributing the article ourselves. And that is not when I started a zine either. I’m glad that the group got some press, but I’m PISSED OFF that things that I said were either taken out of context or were factually untrue.

Considering this is a student publication (meaning more flexibility about things like word count and time to fact check), the article would have been more accurate and informative if some of Tonya’s comments had not been omitted. We also hope that incorrect quotes are addressed asap.

We thank Robin for interviewing Tonya for Vanguard and hope that Robin continues to follow the Women of Color Zine Workshops’ growth in Portland and beyond.

WHAT WAS LEFT OUT

Sometimes news articles and interviews don’t include everything you need to know. We followed up with Tonya Jones to get additional context to share with our community.

Tonya’s comment prefacing her statements that she emailed to POC Zine Project:

I am disappointed that the article didn’t mention the fact that POC/WOC HAD to start alternative forms of media because of white oppression/racism. It wasn’t just a fun hobby!

I did talk about Ida B. Wells and her work with a black newspaper that wrote articles about the lynching of black people. I also talked specifically about the work of the WOC group and our zine collective, which is all about our perspective as living as WOC in Portland which is almost 80% white, and how we have to navigate racisms in a state that has a history of oppression against POC.

These are the answers Tonya submitted to Robin via email, without any editing:

2) Define a zine.

There is a long history on what zines are about, where they started etc. In order to encourage WOC to get involved in making zines/DIY culture, I tend to use the words of a Portland activist I admire (PSU Black Studies professor Walidah Imarisha).

She was once a guest speaker at one of our workshops. She noted that as POC (people of color) we have always had to use alternative forms of media to get our voices heard. Creating our own newspapers, books, journals, etc., self-publishing is a part of our history as WOC. We look at women like Ida B. Wells, who was a journalist and wrote for a black newspaper to speak out about the racist injustices against Black people (lynching).

These were atrocities that were not acknowledged by the mainstream media. POC/WOC have had to write our own stories otherwise we were/are invisible in mainstream society. That is how I define zines, an opportunity for us to continue the legacy of telling truth of our experiences.

3) What made you decide to dedicate a workshop to women of color?

After attending the Portland Zine Symposium (years ago), I noticed a lack of diversity. I really wanted to connect with other WOC zinesters. The following year, I lead a workshop at the PZS called “Women of Color: Writing and Activism.” I received such good feedback from the attendees. I decided to host workshops monthly. It’s how the workshops started and the rest is history!

4) What should people know about zines by and about women of color?

I would like people to know that WOC have always been part of the zine community. You have wonderful long time WOC zinesters like Osa (creator of Shotgun Seamstress a zine dedicated to AfroPunk/Black people in punk), Daniela Capistrano (the founder of the POC Zine Project in NYC and creator of the zine Bad Mexican), Sugene Yang-Kelly (creator of All This is Mine zine), and more that have been out there being creative, self-publishing, lecturing, attending symposiums, etc.

Some of us use our zines to write about our experiences as WOC and to deconstruct oppression in their lives. But, just like other zinesters, we like to talk about our different interests (e.g. music, knitting, cooking, traveling, pets etc.). We are no different (as artists) in many ways, yet we do offer unique history/stories to share as WOC.

Anyone involved in zine culture should have work by WOC zinesters in their collection.

5) What does creating a zine mean to you?

It’s an outlet to purge my feelings about the racism I deal with as a Black woman. I love the freedom of creating a zine. It’s my own project I can return to when I feel up to it or when there are racist issues affecting Black women and I feel I should speak out about it

6) What is the title of your zine and could you tell me a little more about it?

My personal zine is called “See Me: Issues that Affect Our Lives, Acts of Resistance against Oppression and Black Feminist Thought.” I focus on issues of Black women (e.g. racist images in Hollywood, Black motherhood, etc.) with a feminist twist.

The WOC Zine group makes a zine collective called “Women of Color: How to Live in the City of Roses and Avoid the Pricks.” We discuss navigating Portland as WOC (e.g. racism, gentrification, resisting mainstream beauty standards, the arts, etc.).

We are currently working on our 4th issue. It will focus on POC and Housing in Portland (e.g. the displacement of the Black community from Alberta & Mississippi neighborhoods, etc.)

Any further comments?

Last summer (2011), the WOC Zine group applied for a project grant from the Regional Arts & Culture Council. Our project proposal was to host a Women of Color Zine Symposium. We won the grant and hosted Portland’s first WOC Zine Symposium. It was in June of this year. The purpose of the event was to provide a space for WOC artists in Portland to come together while sharing their creative work with the larger community.

The day consisted of tabling of zines, raffle prizes, an open mic (with a reading from our WOC Zinester Scholarship winner writer/poet, Jamondria Harris), a workshop lead by long-time WOC zinester LaMesha Melton (She is the creator of Coco/Puss which a perzine about black women and sexuality discusses being a single mom, sex, racism, feminism, birth control, sex workers, and other topics). and the day ended with a performance with local all-female/multicultural hip-hop group, RoseBent.

We had a great time and looking at ways to host this event again next year. Keep a look out for it!

THOUGHTS ON HOW THINGS GET LEFT OUT

IMPORTANT: We are NOT directing these comments at Robin or implying we know anything about her motivations or freedoms re: her final piece.

Here are our top three points:

1. Sometimes white privilege plays a role in how journalists report on a story. Since racial inequality isn’t typically a white person’s experience, it may not feel necessary to include details directly speaking to racial inequality.

It’s important to be mindful of how your privilege affects what you write about and how you write about it.

2. Interviews via email usually eliminate the possibility of misquoting someone, but sometimes it doesn’t (although we prefer doing interviews in person, with a recorder!). It is up to the journalist to follow up with their subjects to clarify any questions or concerns.

Make sure that the quotes you plan to include are accurate. Take the time to check in advance.

3. It’s generally a good idea for a journalist to email the link for the article (once it’s live) to their interview subjects and inform them that if anything looks fishy, to let them know immediately so they can address it. This takes two seconds. Unfortunately, not everyone does this.

Some journalists excuse themselves by saying that they don’t want their work compromised, but to that we say “BUUUUUULL SHIT!” Making sure that your details are factually correct should not compromise your work.

Here are some additional thoughts, providing by the Women of Color Zine Workshop in their original event listing on Facebook for the 2012 Symposium, that we think are relevant to this dialogue: 

The image people have of Portland is mainly based on the white majority who live here - 76.1 % of the population, according to the 2011 U.S. Census. But the other 23.9%, the other Portland, they have a voice too. And the Women of Color Zine (WOC) group is one of the ways …that other voice can be heard.

REMINDER TO “WHITE ALLIES” WHO CONTACT US FOR ASSISTANCE

Submitting your call for submissions for your primarily or exclusively white-run zine to reach people of color through this platform, without an intro or any context, is inappropriate and the opposite of being a white ally.

Calling yourself a white ally doesn’t make you a white ally. Expecting POC Zine Project to signal boost a call for contributions to a zine that historically features white-only contributors is a gross display of white privilege.

Not reading our FAQ for white allies before submitting your call, that details the steps for white folks to submit their calls to POC Zine Project, before submitting, is equally gross.

It is not our job, or any person of color’s job, to help you find brown people to feature in your historically “by white people/for white people” zine because you lack enough friends of color in your own social circles to approach for collaboration.

We are tired of being nice about this.

Most of the time we are approached by white folks who understand the concept of being an ally and these have been positive exchanges, frequently resulting in collaborations.

But over the past few months - directly connected with the rising visibility of POC Zine Project in zine communities due to the Race Riot! tour - we’ve received more “help me do x” emails and requests for signal boosts from white folks. There is nothing wrong with that.

What is most definitely wrong and derails the possibility of a positive exchange is not checking your privilege before approaching us for assistance.

What is definitely not appreciated is expecting us to assume that just because you call yourself a “white ally,” that must be true. We owe it to our community to present them with facts, not assumptions.

We will not signal boost ANYTHING by any white person simply because they call themselves an ally. We take the role of white allies in the struggle for liberation and equality very seriously. It’s insulting to us and to true white allies when white people use that term but continue to behave in a manner that is silencing and oppressive to people of color.

We expect, and have a right to demand, that if you’re a white person who wants us to signal boost your call for submissions to your zine, that you provide us with at least some related links and other documentation that demonstrates your history of being a white ally. This is clearly spelled out in the FAQ.

Expecting us to take hours of additional time researching whether you’re an ally or not by reading all your zines and fact-checking - because you didn’t bother to share any kind of context - is just another example of white privilege within zine communities.

Scanning one of your zines and finding it filled with photos of white folks, and none of people of color, forces us to assume that you are in denial about your privilege. Featuring ONE person of color in your zine series, which otherwise largely features white contributors only, IS TOKENIZING. YOU ARE NOT BEING AN ALLY.

If you don’t provide context or background when you approach us for support (which should be common courtesy), our only recourse is to take time to research who you are and what you’re about. And we would rather use that time to empower and support POC who are tired of being silenced by people like you. So we won’t do that anymore. Ever again.

Come correct, please. You don’t like your time wasted and neither do we. Check your privilege.

We are, and will always be, primarily a resource for people of color. We appreciate our white allies who understand this and support our goals, knowing that our liberation is their liberation and the path to freedom.

Thank you.

*drops mic, walks off*

- POC ZINE PROJECT

redlightpolitics: I blame Schwyzer for the ineffectual, whitewashed, lukewarm feminism that is incapable of producing substantial change

redlightpolitics:

A while ago, everyone was talking about Anne Marie Slaugher’s piece “Why women can’t have it all”. Back then I wrote that the reason why women cannot have it all is because feminism has stopped being about dreams and utopia and revolution and instead, it has become a…

Spotlighting and signal boosting the fuck out of this.

Excerpts:

For as long as a man like Hugo Schwyzer can silence Women of Color and “groom” White women to act as his shields against our “mean anger”, no woman will be allowed to have it all.

We have gotten to a point where the most revolutionary thing feminism can do is say NO. Just that. No.

… A feminism that gives Schwyzer the benefit of the doubt while he demands that we “prove” our oppression, is nothing but a sham. 

We have the power within all of us (of all backgrounds and genders) to eradicate white supremacy and manarchist, mansplaining bullshit from feminist spaces and - more importantly - the world. <3 

Let’s get to it.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: The ‘Workin on it’ series wants your stories

Xeryle shared this with the community on our Facebook page:

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS
Hey there folks, SlushPilePress wants to do a couple Workin on it! ‘antholo-zines’ on internalized racism and horizontal racial bias/interethnic prejudices. I have had the idea for years but now see it as imperative to the struggles around poc unity.
I know that race/color/ethnicity isn’t the only thing that gets internalized among people of color (there are all those other isms and phobias that intersect with race class etc) but this is a starting point. If you know of examples in your own lives or others that you could write about or perhaps send a link to I would appreciate it. I would like to begin the zines with personal experiences with internalized racism and the second zine with experiences of horizontal racial bias/inter ethnic prejudice-I found this term on the net.
This is not a for-profit venture but I could surely send contributors a copy or two once completed.

Time frame: It appears open but consider submitting before August 15:

*TIME FRAME…well I plan to start pulling things together around mid August so would I’ll probably go with what I have by August 31 for the first one on internalized racism. and the second by the end of September.

Send your submissions and questions to Xeryle, SlushPilePress, at: riverfl0w@riseup.net (‘0’ is zero).

EDITOR’S NOTE: We met Xeryle at this year’s APOCalypse event in NOLA, where SlushPilePress tabled.