POC ZINE PROJECT

Posts tagged signalboost

THIS ARTICLE IS PROBLEMATIC: Race Riot! zine tour touches down in Seattle

The Seattle Globalist didn’t accurately report on our 2013 #raceriottour event in Seattle at Black Coffee Co-op. Although we appreciate it when news sources share information about POCZP, it’s important to us that we’re documented correctly.

1. Sara Rene, poczp’s indigenous solidarity coordinator & touring member, was also in attendance and spoke for over 20 minutes in-depth about Native Punx Unite and why indigenous solidarity is so critical to any social justice movement. Her name was never mentioned in the piece.

Photo evidence:

2. Carey Fuller is a homeless activist. She is very artistic, but to not mention her advocacy at all or why she was partnering with POCZP that night as a speaker is negligent. She bravely shared her perspective as a homeless person in the Seattle area who is also an advocate for/with homeless people, and that shouldn’t go unrecognized.

It’s great that her name was included in the piece as a speaker, but it’s important to document why she was there.

3. Other participants in attendance that night were poczp transportation coordinator Tracey Brown, a community organizer from New Orleans, and poczp founder Daniela Capistrano.

We hope this publication does something about these omissions. Sara Rene made a request on The Seattle Globalist website in her own words a while ago, but as of January 8, 2014, nothing has changed.

Sara

Hey xxxxx

My name is Sara, I saw you at the Black Coffee Co-op during the POCZP event.
I’m actually from Seattle, but traveled about 6000 miles to be at the event and speak for about 20-30 minutes on my zine Native Punx Unite, Indigenous Solidarity and the large community of Native Punks across Turtle Island. I’m not sure if you remember me because I don’t seem to be mentioned in the article you wrote. Not as one of the touring members or speakers or artists or zine-makers or a coordinator for the event, all of which I was. I’d appreciate it if you’d amend the article to include Native Punx Unite.

Nice meeting you,
Sara Rene

Native Punx Unite was started to start giving a platform to the punks, artists and activist from across Turtle Island. Follow us on facebook and tumblr:

https://www.facebook.com/NativePunxUnite
http://nativepunxunite.tumblr.com/

The Seattle Globalist publishes a daily “hyperglobal” news site focused on international connections in the Pacific Northwest.

Please signal boost to encourage writers and publishers to not overlook the contributions of indigenous people at the events they cover. Sometimes it’s better to wait a few more days before publishing to make sure what you broadcast is accurate.

Editor’s Note: POCZP will be publishing detailed recaps from each 2013 #raceriottour date with photos in the coming weeks. We’ve been busy. Stay tuned for what’s in store for POCZP in 2014!

______________

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2014. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to ongoing advocacy costs, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

We are rebooting our org structure in 2014 and will be transparent about that process. Stay tuned.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT: [NYC] A FREE symposium to discuss how to end global sexualized violence THIS FRIDAY 1/25/13
DATE: January 25, 2013
TIME: 8:30 am to 5:00 pm EST
LOCATION: Columbia University Medical Center Bard Hall 50 Haven Avenue
REGISTER: here.
Contact Info: For further information regarding this event, please contact Gerald Govia by sending email to gg2431@mail.cumc.columbia.edu or by calling 2123424542.
***pre-registration is required to attend***
EVENT DETAILS
New York—The Women’s Media Center and Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health on Friday are sponsoring a free symposium to discuss how to end global sexualized violence.
“Global sexualized violence: From epidemiology to action” will bring together scientists, journalists, and policy makers. Robin Morgan, co-founder of the Women’s Media Center, will give the plenary address. Lauren Wolfe, director of WMC’s Women Under Siege project, will moderate two of the sessions. The project has been a leader in bringing attention to sexualized violence against women in war-torn areas.
Speakers will include award-winning journalist Maria Hinojosa;Cristina Finch, director of the women’s human rights program at Amnesty International USA; Cara Hoffman, author of the critically acclaimed So Much Pretty; and representatives from the Centers for Disease Control, the Peace Corps, and Physicians for Human Rights, among other organizations.
The symposium is one of a series of sessions hosted by Columbia University’s Epidemiology Scientific Symposia (CUESS) to look closely at epidemiology and population health.Pre-registration is required.
More details are available at CUESS.org.
The Women’s Media Center works to make women and girls visible and powerful in the media through strategic programs aimed at transforming the media landscape including media training, media monitoring and activism, original media content, media reports, and media programs and initiatives. The organization was founded in 2005 by Jane Fonda, Robin Morgan, and Gloria Steinem.
CONTACT: Cristal Williams Chancellor, Media Relations Manager, cristal@womensmediacenter.com or 202-587-1636.
——-
Point of awareness: womenundersiegeproject.org

COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT: [NYC] A FREE symposium to discuss how to end global sexualized violence THIS FRIDAY 1/25/13

DATE: January 25, 2013

TIME: 8:30 am to 5:00 pm EST

LOCATION: Columbia University Medical Center Bard Hall 50 Haven Avenue

REGISTER: here.

Contact Info: For further information regarding this event, please contact Gerald Govia by sending email to gg2431@mail.cumc.columbia.edu or by calling 2123424542.

***pre-registration is required to attend***

EVENT DETAILS

New York—The Women’s Media Center and Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health on Friday are sponsoring a free symposium to discuss how to end global sexualized violence.

“Global sexualized violence: From epidemiology to action” will bring together scientists, journalists, and policy makers. Robin Morgan, co-founder of the Women’s Media Center, will give the plenary address. Lauren Wolfe, director of WMC’s Women Under Siege project, will moderate two of the sessions. The project has been a leader in bringing attention to sexualized violence against women in war-torn areas.

Speakers will include award-winning journalist Maria Hinojosa;Cristina Finch, director of the women’s human rights program at Amnesty International USA; Cara Hoffman, author of the critically acclaimed So Much Pretty; and representatives from the Centers for Disease Control, the Peace Corps, and Physicians for Human Rights, among other organizations.

The symposium is one of a series of sessions hosted by Columbia University’s Epidemiology Scientific Symposia (CUESS) to look closely at epidemiology and population health.Pre-registration is required.

More details are available at CUESS.org.

The Women’s Media Center works to make women and girls visible and powerful in the media through strategic programs aimed at transforming the media landscape including media training, media monitoring and activism, original media content, media reports, and media programs and initiatives. The organization was founded in 2005 by Jane Fonda, Robin Morgan, and Gloria Steinem.

CONTACT: Cristal Williams Chancellor, Media Relations Manager, cristal@womensmediacenter.com or 202-587-1636.

——-

Point of awareness: womenundersiegeproject.org

SIGNAL BOOST: Picture the Homeless press conference in NYC, TOMORROW 11/16

From Picture the Homeless:

Since Hurricane Sandy, we’ve seen the best of New York on display: people coming together to help their neighbors out, volunteering time and food and money and clothes and manual labor, and collectively creating solutions to our problems.

Today, President Obama is visiting Staten Island to announce a new relief package. Earlier this week, Governor Cuomo announced his intent to ask the federal government for $30 billion in recovery aid. And Mayor Bloomberg has vowed to find housing for the 40,000 people made homeless by Hurricane Sandy.
 
But what about the almost 60,000 who were homeless beforehand? 46,000 living in city shelters, thousands on the streets, thousands more locked up or aging out of foster care or sleeping on the floors of friends and family.
 
Last year, Picture the Homeless found enough housing in vacant property for 199,000 people.

This is data that the city does not have - because they refuse to count vacant property.

We’re happy to share our data with the city - but only if they agree to a recovery plan that includes prevailing-wage jobs and very-low-income housing for folks who were housing-and-employment-challenged BEFORE the storm.

We need your help to make them do the right thing.


If the political will to adopt bold solutions and house 40,000 people made homeless by the storm exists, we are confident that these solutions can also help the people who were homeless before the storm. But so far, all we’re seeing is more of the same old story: the poorest and most vulnerable New Yorkers get the least out of the deal.

According to today’s Daily News, the Feds “are hiring an army of private contractors to do basic repairs” - will those be union jobs? Will low-income people get them, and will they pay a decent wage?

Please join us tomorrow morning, Friday. November 16th at 9:30AM, 116 West 129th Street (between Lenox & Adam Clayton Powell)

City officials and bureaucrats might be in charge of how all that money gets spent, but we run this city. After the storm, small community-based organizations like our heroes CAAAV and FUREE were leading the fight… while the Red Cross, who has raised well over $90 million since the storm hit, has been calling those same groups for guidance (Red Cross workers have even been calling Picture the Homeless because they’re so baffled by how the city’s shelter bureaucracy works). Members of Occupy Sandy have been training FEMA workers and the National Guard… and feeding them too!

This is our city. We have the knowledge and the power to make sure the city leverages storm relief wisely, benefiting all New Yorkers and building us up stronger than we were before.

Please join us tomorrow morning, in Harlem, outside a row of vacant city-owned property on 129th Street, as a way to highlight how the city’s not effectively using the resources it already has.

REBUILD STRONGER RALLY AND PRESS CONFERENCE
Friday. November 16th at 9:30AM
116 West 129th Street
(between Lenox & Adam Clayton Powell)

Call Sam at 646-314-6423 or email sam@picturethehomeless.org with any questions!

PS: Check out this new article about NYC’s recovery efforts, which says “While the city has made noises about a “shortage” of vacant apartments to house the displaced, the scarcity has nothing to do with a lack of space.A recent survey by Picture the Homeless found that New York City currently has more than 3,500 vacant buildings, enough to house nearly 72,000 people as well as enough vacant lots that if developed could house another 128,000.”

POC Zine Project founder Daniela Capistrano will be at this press conference tomorrow, in solidarity with Picture the Homeless.

For more information about POCZP and Carey Fuller’s upcoming zine series by and for people living at or below the poverty line, and how you can help with production and distribution, click here.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: POC Zine Project + Carey Fuller’s zine addressing poverty

COMMUNITY: We still need 30 more people to contribute to our zine by/for people living at/below the poverty line.

DEADLINE: Extended to March15, 2012 (printing and distributing in late Spring of 2013)

EMAIL SUBMISSIONS TO: POCZPpublishing@gmail.com

You can submit on behalf of a person who doesn’t have access to email but we will need to document that you were the conduit.

SUBMISSION CRITERIA

ANYONE of ANY background can submit — you just need to have experience living at or below the poverty line (for any length of time).

ANONYMOUS SUBMISSIONS ARE JUST AS WELCOME AS PUBLIC

We’re looking for information on, but not limited to, the following:

- Revolving door policies that keep people homeless

- How to navigate free and low-cost healthcare services in your area/anywhere

- Ways to heal yourself (herbal remedies/natural)

- Options for accessing free food in your area/anywhere

- Finding safe places to sleep in your area/anywhere

- How to pick your friends/allies in stressful circumstances

- Stories from people who are newly homeless and how they are coping

- Stories from people who are close to homelessness and how they are coping

- Stories from young people who were kicked out and their advice on surviving and thriving

- Mental Health: tips and practices from ANYONE on how to practice self-care/love yourself/find light in the darkness

ABOUT THE ZINE (NAME IS IN PROGRESS)

The goal of this zine series is to share relevant and timely information about how to survive and thrive with little or no money. It will also be a resource for those who are newly homeless or in danger of facing homelessness.

The publication will connect people, share resources and provide real stories from people who have learned how to navigate various facets of red tape when dealing with community services (there will also be a digital version + website).

Carey Fuller, a homeless activist and mother near Seattle, WA, is our lead editor for the series. Click here to learn more about her amazing work.

PUBLISHER FACTS

1. This zine will be free for anyone living at or below the poverty line (honor system). Any individual can access the zine at any POC Zine Project and zine partner events in the US and abroad, online as an e-zine/website, and through our DIY distribution network. Details coming soon.

2. Any agencies, collectives, nonprofits, individuals, etc. interested in offering the zine to their clients and members living at or below the poverty line will receive a bulk rate to cover the cost of printing and distribution.

3. This is a not-for-profit venture through POC Zine Project.

CALL FOR ALLIES

If you are an individual, nonprofit, academic space or agency that serves people living at or below the poverty line and want to collaborate with us on this zine series as a publishing or distribution partner, contact Daniela Capistrano at daniela@dcapmedia.com.

We are also looking for support identifying and applying for grants/relevant funding bodies.

Please help signal boost this call for submissions <3

POC Zine Project offering a free ride to/from SLC Zine Fest to POC

slczinefest:

Sarah Lawrence College Feminist Collective is going to be hosting a small zine fest this year, and we want you! The fest will focus on feminist and queer zines, or queer feminist zines. We are hoping to get some tablers to come and sell zines and merch, as well as some readers and panelist to discuss zine culture and the importance of zines.

Interested? Shoot us a message or check out the event on We Make Zines! You can also email me at feministcollective@gm.slc.edu for more information!

We have a positive history with SLC and hope that POC zinesters in the NY area participate in this event.

POC Zine Project will be offering a free ride (to and from a location in Manhattan) to people of color interested in attending the event in Bronxville. We will take as many people as we can. Stay tuned for more details. If you want to help organize this ride and/or get a ride, message us here or on Facebook.

Here’s the event info from the We Make Zines invite:

Tentative Date: December 1, 2012

Location: Sarah Lawrence College
Street: 1 Mead Way
City/Town: Bronxville, NY
Website or Map: http://slczinefest.tumblr.com/

A zine fest focusing on feminist and queer zines. The event will feature tables for zinesters to sell zines and merch, readings, a panel on zine culture and the importance of zines, and zine making workshops! We are looking for people to be a part of all of these events. Please contact Ciaran Rhodes at crhodes@gm.slc.edu or feministcollective@gm.slc.edu for more information!

SIGNAL BOOST: 'The Peculiar Kind' web series

The Peculiar Kind is a web series that candidly explores the lives and experiences of queer women of color with eye-opening and unscripted conversations.

Episode NO. 4 is alive!

"In this episode the girls explore Babeland, a sex toy shop, and learn about new and improved dildos, how to properly use a dental dam and safe sex. They also hit the sheets to talk about sex education, myths about lesbian sex and being free to love who you want, how you want."

SIGNAL BOOST: The Brown Grrlz Project

"The Brown Grrlz Project is a collective dedicated to the advancement of ‘femme of centre’ cis womyn, queer womyn, two-spirit people, intersex people, trans folks of colour.

The Brown Grrlz Project is dedicated to challenging the way that hegemonic society defines and oppresses Femme identified womyn of colour. We do so by creating intentional spaces where Femmes Of Colour act as authors of their own experience and are valued and recognized, by affirming and sharing science and knowledge created by Femmes of Colour.

Through sharing knowledge, publishing and research, we intend to prioritize the knowledge of feminine womyn as a tool to educate and identify opportunities to create a system that honors ‘femmeness’ as held by racialized and aboriginal women. Through activism we combat structures of privilege with built networks of leaders and community members, dedicated to building a society beyond exclusion.

We also provide support for traumatic outcomes of oppression through community building, skill sharing and community based education. We affirm our value through creating spaces for us to celebrate ourselves.“ — The Brown Grrlz

PLEASE REBLOG! Nearly There: A Queer POC Zine

smallwahala:

PLEASE REBLOG! Nearly There: A Queer POC Zine

What: Nearly There is a zine project meant to address the serious absence and silencing of stories about the experiences of queer people of color. After years of going to zine fests, libraries, bookstores looking for queer zines and POC zines and finding few to none, after years of existing as a queer woman of color and being sidelined in all those communities, and after years of always hearing about a potential zine project like this waiting for someone else to start it, the time is right for us to begin showcasing and prioritizing our own shit. This is for those of us who occupy the spaces of both queer and of color (along with all our other identities), this project is about creating an arena where we can listen and be heard, find commonality and difference, and leave a mark in the making of our own queer history and POC history. I want your stories, art, poetry, everything!

Who: Knowing full well that for many of us, terms like queer or LGBTQ+ often do not and cannot truly measure who we are but being limited by the lack of other terms, this project is for, by, and about queer/LGBTQ+ people of color including those of us who are low-income/working class, 1st/1.5/2nd/3rd generation im/migrants, city based, Mestiz@, Chican@, rural based, bi/multi racial or mixed, undocumented, same-gender-lovin, formerly or currently incarcerated, parents, dark skinned, from any spiritual background, college educated, butch, femme, aggs, street-involved, etc, etc, etc.

Theme: For this first issue, the theme is relatively open and inclusive of any issue, concern, or interest of queer POC. Ideally looking for submissions about in/visibility in queer and POC communities, discourses on coming/being out or not, finding and creating queer POC spaces, and more. Email me with your questions!

Submit: stories, poetry, non-fiction (in any format), drawings, photos, raps, and portraits, rants, quotes, essays, etc.

Send submissions and inquiries to:   nearlytherezine@gmail.com

Deadline: August 1st 2012

This sounds awesome! Let us know how we can help and we definitely want to purchase copies when they are available.