POC ZINE PROJECT

Posts tagged solidarity

Just some sweet and simple anon love: thank you for existing. — Asked by Anonymous

Hi Anon,

Thanks so much for the love. We have been busy! In 2013 (among other initiatives) POCZP led multiple free workshops across the country, presented at Allied Media Conference, Chicago Zine Fest and L.A. Zine Fest to share knowledge, tabled at multiple zine fests in solidarity with local POC, curated & wrote a list of 50 zines by QTPOC, organized & executed a national #RaceRiotTour traveling community experiment, coordinated a massive donation of zines by POC to multiple libraries, continued our Legacy Series work to share influential materiality by POC, provided mini-grants to 20 creators of color, and worked with over 50 volunteers across the country - all as a volunteer entity.

As the recipient of this year’s Long Arm Stapler Award and with our name being dropped in mainstream publications (thanks, Kathleen Hanna!), we are doing our best to graciously navigate public recognition.

Endorsements are great, but what we really need is the resources to be able to continue our important work in 2014 and beyond as a grassroots nonprofit. We consider our work important because we exist to empower people of color to share their stories and to build community. 

We also collaborate with - and disrupt - academic spaces with the intention of being a third space resource.

If you are reading this and believe in POCZP, please donate what you can so that we can continue operations. We aren’t supported by a fiscal sponsor and don’t have an operating budget, and yet we were about to achieve so much this year because we are people-powered. We defy limitations by daring to believe in community.

But we need your help — now more than ever. If you would like to be a part of POCZP’s restructuring phase in 2014, email poczineproject@gmail.com. Help us create a sustainable funding model and access resources.

Please reblog this post and share the donation link with friends. Thank you <3

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

P.S. We are nothing without you, so thank YOU for existing.

______________

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2014. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to ongoing advocacy costs, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

We are rebooted our org structure in 2014 and will be transparent about that process. Stay tuned.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT: Melissa Dee organized a POCZP Benefit Show at Northern in Olympia, WA for 9/21 &lt;3
We&#8217;re trying to add an Olympia-area #RaceRiotTour date, y&#8217;all. If we can&#8217;t swing it on this tour, we&#8217;ll be doing an event there in February of 2014. If yr in the area on 9/21, come out and have a great time. All funds will help us add this tour date!
Excerpt:

The POCZP #RaceRiotTour2013 will be making a stop in Seattle and Northern is hosting a benefit show on Saturday, September 21st with:- Hym(e)n- Black Kerouac- Thems- A special Saturday stoner standup comedy set by Melissa DeeWhat&#8217;s POCZP? Let &#8216;em tell you in their mission statement:Our mission is to make all zines by people of color easy to find, distribute and share. We are an experiment in activism and community through materiality. All donations support POCZP touring and advocacy costs.$5 | 8pm

Share the Facebook invite with yr friends and reblog this post, help us get the word out. We want to be wherever you want us to be but we need yr help! &lt;3
Much love to Melissa Dee and everyone involved with making this event happen, including Northern for hosting.
______________
WANT MORE?
Learn more about the 2013 #RaceRiotTour
Meet the first-ever #RaceRiotTour wellness team &lt;3
Meet Tracey Brown, dedicated driver/mediator! &lt;3
Meet one of our 20+ rotating tour members, Nyky Gomez (Brown Recluse Zine Distro)—more bios coming soon!
______________
SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT
If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.
DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT: Melissa Dee organized a POCZP Benefit Show at Northern in Olympia, WA for 9/21 <3

We’re trying to add an Olympia-area #RaceRiotTour date, y’all. If we can’t swing it on this tour, we’ll be doing an event there in February of 2014. If yr in the area on 9/21, come out and have a great time. All funds will help us add this tour date!

Excerpt:

The POCZP #RaceRiotTour2013 will be making a stop in Seattle and Northern is hosting a benefit show on Saturday, September 21st with:

- Hym(e)n
- Black Kerouac
- Thems
- A special Saturday stoner standup comedy set by Melissa Dee

What’s POCZP? Let ‘em tell you in their mission statement:

Our mission is to make all zines by people of color easy to find, distribute and share. We are an experiment in activism and community through materiality. All donations support POCZP touring and advocacy costs.

$5 | 8pm

Share the Facebook invite with yr friends and reblog this post, help us get the word out. We want to be wherever you want us to be but we need yr help! <3

Much love to Melissa Dee and everyone involved with making this event happen, including Northern for hosting.

______________

WANT MORE?

______________

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

ZINESTER SPOTLIGHT: Celina Williams, Zinester & Librarian in Virginia

Some of Celina Williams' zines: POC zinester and librarian in Richmond, VA

[DESCRIPTION: Some of Celina Williams’ own zines. Photo credit: Celina]

By Cata, POCZP East Coast Intern/Coordinator

Celina Williams is a zinester, a librarian of special collections and a Richmond Zine Fest organizer for 5+ years. You can visit Celina and a zine collection within the James Branch Cabell Library in Richmond, VA.

Check out Richmond Zine Fest, happening this year on October 5th! Find out more at richmondzinefest.org. Richmond Zine Fest has been going strong in Richmond, VA, since 2007.

From Celina:

Richmond Zine Fest registration for workshops and tablers is open… if you know of any folks who’d be available/interested to participate Saturday Oct. 5th, I’d be happy to answer any questions.

POCZP’S Q&A WITH CELINA

POCZP: How long have you been making zines?

CELINA: Consciously, for the past 6+ years. When I was a kid I would play around with the stapler and make little books—those are zines right!?

POCZP: Nice! What kind of zines do you make currently?

CELINA: I make poetry and photo zines. My latest issue is Mean Girls and it’s about being told I look mean because I don’t smile. So it got me thinking about the mean/nice binary. Also, being a black and Hispanic woman, I am used to people commenting about my demeanor and look, they often say “what are you?”

POCZP: Any ideas for future zines?

CELINA: Actually, yes!! A friend and I were walking and noticing how trees often have these beautiful designs that often look look like vaginas, so a collaboration zine soon to be made will be called In the Tree’s Vagina.

POCZP: Awesome. Man, I can think of a lot of trees that would be perfect for your zine haha! Switching gears a bit, why do you think making zines is important?

CELINA: Well, I am a librarian and I view zines as creating a kind of archive for yourself. I see zines like that. But it’s an archive that you share. For example my mom bought me a diary when I was younger; but it felt weird to write and not share.

POCZP: Wow!! I love that because it makes me think of one of my favorite quotes “an untold story is the greatest burden” by Alice Walker.

CELINA: Right! And self-publication in zines is cool because in academia there is this rigid way you have to be—and that just doesn’t exist in zines.

POCZP: Any other things your working on?

CELINA: Yes! I am reorganizing the zine collection at our library (yes we have a zine collection!) and after this interview I will be finding out a way to tag and measure POC representation in our collection.

POCZP: That’s awesome! Let POC Zine Project know if you need any support! Any last exciting things happening in your community?

CELINA: Thank-you! and yes…Shout out to Richmond Zine Fest Co-organizers!! Which I’ve been a part of for the past 5+ years. Also, it was just international zine month so don’t forget to check out new zines!!

POCZP: Thank you!

</end>

CONTACT CELINA

celinanicoledoes.tumblr.com

Twitter.com/celinanicole

_____________________

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $10, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

POC Zine Project wants to see YOUR #POCZINES Collection

What does your ‪#‎poczines‬ collection look like? Send us a photo of your shelf/drawer/area under your pillow/etc. & we’ll feature it in our ‪#‎izm2013‬ reactions post first week of August.

If you only have two zines created by POC, it’s still a collection - even if you made both of them!  

Deadline: August 28, 2013

PLEASE EMAIL: poczineproject@gmail.com (we are only accepting submissions through email, thanks!)

Please be sure to include the following:

- 1-3 max photos of your #poczines collection (please make sure they are as clear as possible) with photo credit info (the higher resolution the better, thanks!)

- your bio

- any links/contact info you want to share

- info about your own zines that YOU make (optional)

- any of your upcoming/current projects that need some signal boost love. We gotchu boo. 

We know many folks collect zines by authors of diverse backgrounds, so it’s 100% OK/common if you have a mix of POC and non-POC authored zines in your collection. However, for the purposes of this visibility exercise, we only want to see the zines made by POC in your collection (co-authored with non-POC is fine, as long as editor was/is POC).

WHITE FOLKS: Send photos & info about your #poczines collection as well! We wants to see the #poczines on your shelves too.

Please be sure to also include what POC solidarity looks like in your life, both in theory and in practice. 

<3,

POCZP

June 30 is POC Zine Project’s One Year Tumblr Anniversary!

On June 30, 2012, The POC Zine Project Tumblr was “born” at Hive Learning Network NYC's Summer Code Party Pop-Up with Tumblr and Mozilla at DCTV. Not only did we receive help from Tumblr staff in setting up this Tumblr, POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano was able to share information in real time about POCZP at the event (see image from that day below) with attendees!

image

 

Since June of 2012, POZCP has shared information about zines by people of color and intersectional projects with the Tumblr community. We brought you daily recaps from our first-ever Race Riot! Tour last fall because it was important to us to keep you informed.

For the past year, we’ve appreciate your submissions, reblogs and feedback. Prior to the launch of the POCZP Tumblr in 2012, we were actively “listening” on Tumblr through private accounts since 2007 — tracking “zine”-tagged posts, observing how folks of color from all walks of life use Tumblr, how zinesters were using Tumblr and figuring out what our short and long term goals are for this space <3

We hope that we help make your Tumblr explorations a fun, inspiring and informative experience. If you’ve benefitted in any way from our efforts on Tumblr, please consider making a donation of any amount to POC Zine Project.

We are in the process of planning our second Race Riot! Tour and must raise $14,000 to cover the costs of a 20 city national tour, which will take place in October and November of 2013. We’ve expanded the tour to include cities in the midwest and a date in Mexico. We know we can do it but we need your help. <3 Thanks for your support.

- POC Zine Project

P.S. If you don’t have any funds—we hear ya! POCZP is a grassroots organization and we are all volunteers. We have operated without 501(c)(3) status the past three years for a reason: to stay as free as possible, so we can move as quickly as possible. Help the cause by forwarding this link to friends on your social accounts, email and by reblogging. We appreciate the love.

——————-

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

SCENE REPORT: MOONROOT + POC Zine Project session at Allied Media Conference 2013 [Pt 1 of 3]

Allied Media Conference 2013 is from June 20 - 23, 2013. This is POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano’s recap from #AMC2013 on Friday, June 21.

Part of my advocacy—and what has informed POCZP’s focus—is to make information accessible to people of color who might not otherwise have access for a multitude of reasons. That being said, so much happened yesterday that my mind is in a whirl about what to share. I want to help those who can’t be at this year’s conference to feel like they are a part of it—that the information being shared here belongs to them too. I would not be at #AMC2013 if it wasn’t for the support of my co-presenters MOONROOT & Adela C. Licona, so I want to share what’s going on here with the POCZP community.

But how do I condense Day 1 (made up of so many experiences as a first time attendee and presenter) into one Tumblr post? Seems impossible. But instead of continuing to pace anxiously in my hotel room, I will simply share some brief notes, photos and videos from yesterday. I hope that—wherever you are, whoever you are (but especially my people of color)—you enjoy this first recap and tap into some of the excitement, inspiration, beauty and community I experienced at my first day of Allied Media Conference. Enjoy! <3

——-

DAY ONE OF WORKSHOPS AT 2013 ALLIED MEDIA CONFERENCE

Friday was our (POCZP’s) session with our allies/collaborators MOONROOT and professor Adela C. Licona. The name of our session was Zine-making Across the Diaspora.

MOONROOT folks Linda and Sine brought their zine-making materials and zine-making knowledge, as well as their positive, loving energy. If they were nervous, I could not tell. I was nervous but also excited.

SPOTTED: Linda and Sine from MOONROOT zine collective #amc2013 #zines #poczines #detroit

[DESCRIPTION: MOONROOT’s Linda (L) and Sine (R). Sine helped POCZP produce our Baltimore event last year.]

[DESCRIPTION: In this video, folks start to arrive to our session and POCZP Midwest Coordinator Joyce Hatton says hello <3]

We had a spacious & lovely art room to present in at Wayne State University in Detroit. As people began to show up to participate, all my nerves melted away. I felt so affirmed and energized by their presence.

SPOTTED: Hawa from @browntourage presentingvat #amc2013 browntourage.com

[DESCRIPTION: Hawa from @browntourage who is presenting at #amc2013 attended our session: browntourage.com. I look forward to building with them in Oakland late this fall.]

There were 40-50 people in attendance, which felt like such a blessing. There are so many incredible workshops here that overlap so I was excited and surprised when our room was at capacity.

SPOTTED: Texta felt-tip superhero www.textaqueen.com @textaaa #poczines

[DESCRIPTION: TEXTAQUEEN came to our #amc2013 session but this photo is from June 20, 2013, the day before. We are going to collaborate with TEXTA so that they can be a part of this year’s Race Riot! Tour. We just need to raise the funds! <3]

It was a transformative & inspiring experience for me to share information with other people of color who are invested in celebrating the rich history of zines/independent publications by people of color.

SPOTTED: "Zines in Third Space" author Adela and Fargo-Moorhead Zine Fest founder & POCZP Midwest Coordinator Joyce Hatton! #poczines #zines #amc2013

[DESCRIPTION: Adela (L) and POCZP Midwest Coordinator Joyce Hatton (R) at our #AMC2013 session. It was exciting to finally meet Joyce in person after months of communicating/planning via the web and phone!]

Adela explained her “third space” theory with everyone, which you can learn more about in her book “Zines in Third Space.” POC Zine Project is a “third space” too (so am I, as a person/activist)! Adela and I will do a post on “third space” theory after the conference to help explain it all. …Many of you reading this now not only function/thrive in “third spaces” but are also living & breathing examples of “third space” theory.

But yeah—our session! In addition to talking about the history of zines from a POC lens, we had fun making zines!

June 21, 2013: Folks making zines at our #amc2013 #makezines session

Some folks in attendance had never made a zine before and I was honored to be a part of their first experience.  

Folks making zines at our #amc2013 #makezines session on Friday, June 21, 2013 SPOTTED: POCZP founder Daniela & MOONROOT zine collective member Sine before their #amc2013 #makezines session

[DESCRIPTION: Co-presenters POCZP founder Daniela and MOONROOT’s Sine]

Attendees making #zines at our session at #amc2013 #makezines on June 21 2013 Folks making #zines at our #amc2013 #makezines session with MOONROOT and Adela C. LIcona on June 21 2013 Folks making and reading #zines at our #amc2013 #makezines session with MOONROOT and Adela C. Licona

SPOTTED: Gabby Rivera @quirkyrican w her first mini #zine #amc2013 #wemakezines

[DESCRIPTION: Gabby Rivera @quirkyrican smiles at lunchtime with her first mini-zine made at our session]

SPOTTED: Billione shares their mini #zine from our #makezines #amc2013 session with MOONROOT

[DESCRIPTION: Billione shares his mini-zine from our #makezines #amc2013 session with MOONROOT: getbillione.blogspot.com/]

It was also a great learning experience for me to experience condensing the history of zines (with a focus on POC history) into five minutes (I think I did ok)! Due to time constraints, I had to keep it to U.S. zine history but it’s important to note that zine culture is worldwide and that POC make zines about any topic you can think of—worldwide.

POCZP, as part of our Legacy Series, will be sharing more zines by POC from all parts of the world. Stay tune for more on that …

All the #amc2013 #makezines presenters from left to right: Adela C. Licona, Moonroot's Linda, POCZP founder Daniela and Moonroot's Sine

[DESCRIPTION: All the presenters from our session from left to right: Adela C. Licona, MOONROOT’s Linda, POCZP founder Daniela and MOONROOT’s Sine <3]

After my spur-of-the-moment call to action during the zine-making phase (which MOONROOT did a terrific job leading), 10-12 (need to check my bag again) folks who made zines donated them to the POC Zine Project archive!

Some of the mini #zines made at #amc2013 #wemakezines our session w MOONROOT

[DESCRIPTION: Some of the mini-zines folks made at our #AMC2013 #MAKEZINES session with MOONROOT and Adela C. Licona on June 21, 2013]

I will be scanning the mini-zines and sharing them with you all (with permission from the creators) on POCZP’s digital platforms and then mailing back the originals <3

After our session, I took a lunch/connect with allies/friends/resting break and then went to another workshop at #AMC2013 called Designing Games to Understand Complexity.

Spotted: people playing games at the designing games to understand complexity session at #amc2013 on June 21 2013

That experience further inspired me to create a #poczines online game to help people learn more about the rich history of zines/independent publications by people of color from the 1700s - 2000s. More on that later …

After the games workshop, I attended the #AMC2013 opening ceremony, where after an inspiring recap of AMC’s last 15 years was shared, a spontaneous dance party broke out on stage.

People rush the stage to dance at the #amc2013 opening ceremony on June 21, 2013 <3

[DESCRIPTION: #AMC2013 attendees rush the stage to dance at the June 21, 2013 opening ceremony]

It was so beautiful that for many reasons I felt my eyes filling with tears. I hope this gives you somewhat of a sense of what I was seeing and feeling.

Dancing, love and joy at the #amc2013 opening ceremony #detroit on Friday, June 21, 2013 Beautiful crowd surfing at the opening ceremony at #amc2013 #detroit. People of all ages were crowd surfing on stage! Folks workin it out after rushing the stage to dance at opening ceremony #amc2013 #detroit June 21, 2013 POCZP midwest coordinator Joyce Hatton after dancing on stage at #amc2013 #detroit on June 21, 2013 <3

[DESCRIPTION: POCZP Midwest Coordinator Joyce Hatton smiles after dancing on stage at the #AMC2013 opening ceremony on June 21, 2013]

[DESCRIPTION” People dancing at the opening ceremony on June 21, 2013 at #AMC2013. Vine by Ryann Supamakenzi]

Today (Saturday, June 22, 2013) I plan on attending another workshop and getting some free acupuncture (my first experience) and a tarot reading by Jade Fair, who you can see in the photo below. Jade Fair will be joining this year’s Race Riot! tour …

upload

 [DESCRIPTION: Jade Fair holds her first zine SOFT SERVE #1 at #AMC2013 on June 20, 2013. Interview with her coming next week <3]

I hope you enjoyed my first recap from #AMC2013. Let me know what you want to see more of! I will do my best to help make this event as accessible as possible for those who could not attend. You are here with me in spirit and I feel your support and positive energy. <3

Love & Solidarity,

Daniela Capistrano

Founder, POC Zine Project

——

ABOUT ALLIED MEDIA CONFERENCE

The Allied Media Conference is a collaborative laboratory of media-based organizing strategies for transforming our world, held every Summer in Detroit.

CREATE

At the AMC, we understand media as any way in which we communicate with the world, from zines to breakdancing, to designing neighborhood-based communications infrastructure. We share and create media that exposes, investigates, heals, builds confidence and radical hope, incites dialogue and debate. We demystify technology, not only learning how to use it, but how to design and build our own.  In doing so, we redefine technology’s role and impact in our lives. The AMC creates learning environments for all ages and skill levels, including hands-on workshops, strategy sessions, presentations and performances.

CONNECT

 The AMC is a network of networks – social justice organizers, community technologists, transformative artists, educators, entrepreneurs, and many others — all using media in innovative ways. Some of these networks sprout from the conference, grow over the course of the year then reconvene in Detroit larger and healthier. Others use the AMC as an annual point of convergence and a space to forge new relationships. Through cycles of participatory investigation and experimentation, our networks continue to grow, generating new theories and practices of media-based organizing.

TRANSFORM

As our networks grow, so does our capacity to take collective actions to transform our world. At the AMC, we develop new leaders and new forms of leadership, design new methods of problem-solving, cultivate the visions of our communities and build our power to make those visions real. 

——————-

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

POC Zine Project is at Allied Media Conference in Detroit!
POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano will be co-presenting with allies from  MOONROOT, along with &#8220;Zines in Third Space" author &amp; professor Adela C. Licona Ph.D.
Daniela is here to share information about POC Zine Project with #AMC2013 attendees and to share information with YOU, our community, about the conference. She will produce daily recaps with photos, mini videos and notes on sessions, all while experiencing her first Allied Media Conference as both an attendee and speaker.
Here&#8217;s Adela and Sarita walking to register at #AMC2013 (Daniela is getting used to using Vine):


Here&#8217;s MOONROOT/POCZP&#8217;s session info:
Zine-making Across the Diaspora
FRIDAY - JUNE 21, 2013: BLOCK 2: FRI 11:00AM - 12:30PM
Art Ed. 162
HANDS-ON WORKSHOP (90 MINUTES) | APPROPRIATE AND ENGAGING FOR ALL AGES | APPROPRIATE FOR ALL LEVELS #AMC2013 #MAKEZINES
Materiality matters! How do people of color come to share our stories in this increasingly connected yet disaffected world? In this workshop, members of MOONROOT and the POC Zine Project will share how zines can be used as a medium to build community and how it can be particularly salient for diasporic communities and communities of color. We will introduce basic zine-making techniques for participants to learn and engage with each other, and walk away with their own zines.
PRESENTERS:
Sine Hwang Jensen - MOONROOT
Amy Dewan - MOONROOT
Daniela Capistrano - Founder, POC Zine Project &amp; CEO of DCAP Media

linda nguyễn - MOONROOT; Living Proof Print Collective
Adela C. Licona Ph.D. - Assistant Professor at University of Arizona and author of Zines In Third Space: Radical Cooperation and Borderlands Rhetoric -
&#8212;
MOONROOT/Sine helped POCZP coordinate last year&#8217;s Baltimore eventsas part of the Race Riot! tour.
Big love to MOONROOT for inviting POCZP to participate at this year&#8217;s #AMC2013 and to Adela for sharing her room with Daniela!
&#8212;&#8212;
ABOUT ALLIED MEDIA CONFERENCE

AMC Mission

The Allied Media Conference is a collaborative laboratory of media-based organizing strategies for transforming our world, held every Summer in Detroit.
CREATE
At the AMC, we understand media as any way in which we communicate with the world, from zines to breakdancing, to designing neighborhood-based communications infrastructure. We share and create media that exposes, investigates, heals, builds confidence and radical hope, incites dialogue and debate. We demystify technology, not only learning how to use it, but how to design and build our own.  In doing so, we redefine technology’s role and impact in our lives. The AMC creates learning environments for all ages and skill levels, including hands-on workshops, strategy sessions, presentations and performances.
CONNECT
 The AMC is a network of networks – social justice organizers, community technologists, transformative artists, educators, entrepreneurs, and many others &#8212; all using media in innovative ways. Some of these networks sprout from the conference, grow over the course of the year then reconvene in Detroit larger and healthier. Others use the AMC as an annual point of convergence and a space to forge new relationships. Through cycles of participatory investigation and experimentation, our networks continue to grow, generating new theories and practices of media-based organizing.
TRANSFORM
As our networks grow, so does our capacity to take collective actions to transform our world. At the AMC, we develop new leaders and new forms of leadership, design new methods of problem-solving, cultivate the visions of our communities and build our power to make those visions real. 
&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;-
SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT
If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.
DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

POC Zine Project is at Allied Media Conference in Detroit!

POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano will be co-presenting with allies from  MOONROOT, along with “Zines in Third Space" author & professor Adela C. Licona Ph.D.

Daniela is here to share information about POC Zine Project with #AMC2013 attendees and to share information with YOU, our community, about the conference. She will produce daily recaps with photos, mini videos and notes on sessions, all while experiencing her first Allied Media Conference as both an attendee and speaker.

Here’s Adela and Sarita walking to register at #AMC2013 (Daniela is getting used to using Vine):

Here’s MOONROOT/POCZP’s session info:

Zine-making Across the Diaspora

FRIDAY - JUNE 21, 2013: BLOCK 2: FRI 11:00AM - 12:30PM

Art Ed. 162

HANDS-ON WORKSHOP (90 MINUTES) | APPROPRIATE AND ENGAGING FOR ALL AGES | APPROPRIATE FOR ALL LEVELS #AMC2013 #MAKEZINES

Materiality matters! How do people of color come to share our stories in this increasingly connected yet disaffected world? In this workshop, members of MOONROOT and the POC Zine Project will share how zines can be used as a medium to build community and how it can be particularly salient for diasporic communities and communities of color. We will introduce basic zine-making techniques for participants to learn and engage with each other, and walk away with their own zines.

PRESENTERS:

Sine Hwang Jensen - MOONROOT

Amy Dewan - MOONROOT

Daniela Capistrano - Founder, POC Zine Project & CEO of DCAP Media

linda nguyễn - MOONROOT; Living Proof Print Collective

Adela C. Licona Ph.D. - Assistant Professor at University of Arizona and author of Zines In Third Space: Radical Cooperation and Borderlands Rhetoric -

MOONROOT/Sine helped POCZP coordinate last year’s Baltimore eventsas part of the Race Riot! tour.

Big love to MOONROOT for inviting POCZP to participate at this year’s #AMC2013 and to Adela for sharing her room with Daniela!

——

ABOUT ALLIED MEDIA CONFERENCE

AMC Mission

The Allied Media Conference is a collaborative laboratory of media-based organizing strategies for transforming our world, held every Summer in Detroit.

CREATE

At the AMC, we understand media as any way in which we communicate with the world, from zines to breakdancing, to designing neighborhood-based communications infrastructure. We share and create media that exposes, investigates, heals, builds confidence and radical hope, incites dialogue and debate. We demystify technology, not only learning how to use it, but how to design and build our own.  In doing so, we redefine technology’s role and impact in our lives. The AMC creates learning environments for all ages and skill levels, including hands-on workshops, strategy sessions, presentations and performances.

CONNECT

 The AMC is a network of networks – social justice organizers, community technologists, transformative artists, educators, entrepreneurs, and many others — all using media in innovative ways. Some of these networks sprout from the conference, grow over the course of the year then reconvene in Detroit larger and healthier. Others use the AMC as an annual point of convergence and a space to forge new relationships. Through cycles of participatory investigation and experimentation, our networks continue to grow, generating new theories and practices of media-based organizing.

TRANSFORM

As our networks grow, so does our capacity to take collective actions to transform our world. At the AMC, we develop new leaders and new forms of leadership, design new methods of problem-solving, cultivate the visions of our communities and build our power to make those visions real. 

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

Tu eres mi otro yo (You are my other me)

Si te hago daño a ti (If I do harm to you)

Me hago daño a mi (I do harm to myself)

Si te amo y te respeto (If I love and respect you)

Me amo y me respeto yo (I love and respect myself)

My Other Me by Luis Valdez (via alannaspeak)

<3 #reblogforever

Let’s Talk About: ‘The Truth Tour and how to be an ally at POC and Native events’

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By Cata, POCZP East Coast Intern

The Truth Tour consists of folks from the Pine Ridge reservation of South Dakota and allies, traveling to different cities in the Midwest and mid-Atlantic to tell their stories, advocating for a return to matriarchal leadership and raising awareness of the ongoing genocide of their people. The event I attended was a film screening of the documentary “Red Cry,” held in Washington, DC, on April 16th.

Below is an entry point into a continuous conversation, not a rule book. 

A big question that surrounds POC (people of color) events from those outside of the community holding the event is "how can I be an ally?"

A simple answer to these questions is to put your self in service to the community and don’t take up space. 

DC ‘TRUTH TOUR' EVENT RECAP

April 16 – Washington, DC – Metropolitan Community Church of DC – 6:30pm

When the Lakota Grandmothers came to DC in April, my partner and I cooked a meal for an event as an act of support/solidarity. What follows here are my reflections as an audience member/participant in the film screening event.

I write with a strong desire to contribute to a (hopefully) ongoing conversation of allyship. The night of the event in DC there were many important voices and stories shared. The group had come a long way to spread their voices. I am thankful for their journey. I felt blessed to be among these strong travelers and hope to meet them again one day.

However, among the powerful stories offered there were important voices and stories that were missed. Here are some things I observed as I watched the evening pass with a complex interplay of isms and unchecked privileges.

For days afterward I couldn’t get out of my head the Q&A session after the “Red Cry” screening. 

The white anarchist/activist who stood up and said “I don’t know about the rest of the room, but me and my house mates on THIS side of the room- we’re REALLY in SOLIDARITY with you all! REALLY!”

This wasn’t a question; it was a comment offered perhaps to receive an ego stroke from the audience/caravaners and it was distracting.

Then, there was an African-American woman who stood up asking to be part of the Lakota people, referencing her own Native heritage. It was refreshing to see a person of color seeking to honor their indigenous heritage— but the word use: “Can I be a part of you?” made my face scrunch.

Again, this was not a question pertaining to their journey or to the film.

Then, three or four folks raised their hands… again without questions… but instead with gifts. Literally folks were walking up to an elder with shells, books and bags of what? I don’t know.

Weird? Yes. Distracting? Yes. Ego strokes? Yes and yes.

Three-quarters of the way through the event, the main Native male speaker who had been speaking the most and facilitating, acknowledged that the others on his caravan, including most of the women, had not spoken. He suggested that they go down the line and share something.

"Yes, finally!" I thought, time to hear everyones voice. But, wait. One more person in the audience needs the spot light and asks a question/comment…then POOF! Our time is done.

A song is sung and things are wrapped up. There is never time to hear the voices of the other Native folks, most of them women, from the caravan.

NEXT STEPS

As POC organizers we need to reflect:

  • On this Truth Tour designed to advocate a return to matriarchy, how did the Native man facilitating (and the crew as a whole) not realize that his voice was filling the time available at the expense of other (female) voices from the caravan?
  • How do we as POC organizers/activists let inter-communities privileges distract or disappear an important layer in our events or projects? 
  • How did the audience continue on unaware of their distracting behavior?
  • Why did certain audience members(and why do some folks) think it was/is ok to deconstruct their internal conflicts on some one else’s time?

This brings me back to allyship. Here are some ways to be an ally:

1) Be aware of your layers (gender, colourism, class, race, orientation, shyness etc).

2) Take your OWN time to process privilege, settlers guilt etc.

3) Do your service, go home and process in your journal or with other allies about your experience and how to be a better ally next time.

It’s all good. We are all learning here, but to distract from someone else’s event/or project with your own internal conflicts is unchecked privilege. To disappear someone else’s voice or story with your own, no matter if you’re an ally or a member of the community is rude. These patterns disrupt progress.

Privileges unchecked and unprocessed hurt ourselves and our communities. Until we learn as how to beware of our layers and hold one another accountable the biggest thing that will come of our events and projects in the eyes of others (and maybe ourselves) is debriefing the distractions.

Distractions are annoying. And, distractions are NOT solidarity. Lets move the focus back.

NYC ‘TRUTH TOUR’ EVENT RECAP

April 8, 2013 – New York City, NY, Judson Memorial Church- 239 Thompson St. (Solidarity/Decolonization Training) – 7:00pm

By Anonymous contributor to POCZP

I attended the Indigenous Solidarity and Decolonizing Training at Judson Memorial Church in hopes of learning more about the Lakota people, their struggles, and what it means to be in solidarity with indigenous communities. I was looking forward to participating in conversations about the meaning of decolonization and how one develops and sustains a political praxis around decolonizing the self in relation to community.

These days I have been thinking a lot about what it means for me, a women of color to challenge the mindset of settler colonialism that is part of my privilege and my immigrant histories. I believe that the complexities of communities of color engaging with native and indigenous communities should not be limited to understand through reading books and watching documentaries, so I went to this event to listen, to learn, to say hello.

I have deep respect the leaders of this training, for their histories and communities, and for the ways in which they walk through this world. However what I experienced last night was triggering, frustrating, and very confusing.

All but one of the Lakota grandmothers was present and the reason for this was never clearly explained or discussed. We began by asking those in the room who have any European ancestry, to stand up. As expected nearly eighty plus percent of the room were of European descent; I was one of few women of color, and perhaps South Asian in the room who did not stand up.

I have a vague understand of the purpose of this exercise, to call attention to the active realities of colonization as part of people’s being, and that as privilege that you cannot erase. However the presenters did not once ask any questions or specifically engage with the people of color in the room to ask why there were present, what it means for people of color to experience colonialism, and how the displacement of communities of color can reinforce colonial oppressions that native peoples face.

Once again white people became the center focus of the discussion, a conversation that I am sick in tired of having.

How can we destroy the constructs of whiteness if we continually reify them in our political spaces through reliving trauma and shaming one another?

There were several instances where the main “teacher” of this “training” used disparaging language against biracial and multiracial people. They outlined the role of elderly women, or the grandmothers in the struggle without giving the elderly women in the room a chance to speak out on their own and share their stories.

There was a moment where a white man was being disruptive and the presenter challenged him on his behavior, but did not ask him to leave the room. Of course this man continued to be disruptive and my friend, a women of color, had to ask him to leave.

I could give further specifics and in detail but I am not interested in calling out the presenter or the organizers of this event. Rather, I write this to raise the question of how can we build solidarity and decolonize together when so many of our political spaces are dominated by the politics of whiteness and by those whom I gender as being male-identified and male-bodied?

What is it going to take for men to recognize their male-privilege and to step down, work together on building true allyship with women in the struggle, and to call each other out?

There is a lot to say about this training. I am vested in having these conversations in person, and with people I hope to build my politics and community with.

However, in sharing this, I hope we can have a more open and honest dialogue about how to challenge spaces that are political defunct in the moment, and how to create something new that has a liberating direction.

Editor’s Note: POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano attended the NYC Truth Tour date and put a call for feedback on the POCZP Facebook page. Subsequently, Daniela spoke with this anonymous contributor, who gave POCZP permission to publish their thoughts under the condition that they remain anonymous. POCZP respects their choice to remain anonymous, as often it can be very difficult and triggering as a POC to question POC-led movements/actions.

MORE ON THE APRIL 8 NYC TRUTH TOUR EVENT

Below are POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano’s thoughts on the NYC Truth Tour event, originally published on the POCZP Facebook page. She also recorded this positive moment at the end of the evening:

[DESCRIPTION: The event leaders asked attendees to participate in a round dance at the end of the event. Couples were placed in the middle circle, while the elders were in another circle around it. After a while, others who weren’t necessarily elders were encouraged to join the outer circle. Native and non-native folks participated in the dance. This video captures about 80% of the round dance duration.]

By Daniela Capistrano, POCZP founder

The event overall was (for folks we spoke to) very triggering and complex. I wish that more female elders spoke, since that is what the tour is about. However, I also understand that there is another related event where female elders will be speaking.

This event wasn’t an “easy” experience. Some folks said there wasn’t enough actual training and that it was more of a blame game. Others did not agree with this assessment at all and said they got a lot out of it.

The event leaders asked everyone at the start of the experience “to listen with your heart.” Some people in attendance had a very had time just listening and there were many privilege issues at play. One white male would not stop interjecting and made it all about him until he was asked to stop. He could not handle that feedback and left.

Another white male took up way too much time singing a “spiritual” song, making the focus about him instead of the elders. A white female spoke on behalf of a black male in attendance without his consent. Many interesting and triggering actions went down last night at this event, a microcosm of bigger issues at play …

Some participants had issues with being put on the spot based on race, class and gender. Another controversial facet of the training was when attendees were challenged to cut up their government IDs as a symbol of their commitment to decolonize. Clearly there are many factors that would inform someone’s decision to participate or not, such as citizenship status in the U.S. and the dangerous ramifications of not having ID while experiencing racial profiling or worse. Race, class and gender were also factors.

One could argue that this act of cutting up an ID meant nothing and was in fact hurtful to undocumented folks in attendance or others in tenuous circumstances. Lots to think about. But I aired on the side of listening with an open mind and staying until the end. I chose to cut up my ID to confront my privileges; to know what it felt like to destroy government issued materiality; and to think about all the privileges that made it so “easy” for me to cut up my ID without any real consequences. I did it for myself, didn’t judge those who didn’t and also doesn’t think that cutting an ID automatically “decolonized” my existence and mental state. For me, it was an act of undoing mental damage tied to identity politics.

I am glad that I did stay until the end of the event, because I was able to meet one of the female elders, who I hope will collaborate with POCZP on the Race Riot tour this fall, as #IdleNoMore is our core focus. 

Because I stayed until the end, I was able to capture the round dance on video, which had a very peaceful and healing affect for many who participated.

In closing, it’s 100% OK to not agree with all facets of a decolonizing event. It’s OK to not agree with the leaders and to walk out when you feel triggered. Several people did walk out. But I am glad that I stayed.

NOTICE: POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano reached out to Truth Tour organizers in April to share feedback and to discuss a possible collaboration for the Race Riot! tour. She also reached out again upon publishing this piece. We are patiently awaiting a response.

COMMUNITY: Help make this a productive conversation by adding your thoughts in your reblog.

RESOURCES

Educate yourself on what the Truth Tour is all about:

"Red Cry" information:

"Red Cry" premiered on April 1, 2013, at the Mother Butler Center in Rapid City, SD in Lakota Territory.  It was shown on consecutive nights in other cities as part of the Lakota Truth Tour.

Limited quantities of the Red Cry DVD are available for free.  If you would like a DVD sent to you, Truth Tour organizers request that you give a donation of $5 or more to cover the costs of shipping and materials.

Please mail your address and a check made payable to “Lakota Solidarity Project” to:

Lakota Solidarity Project
PO Box 881
Asheville, NC 28801

If you would like to show the film in your area, they ask that you download the Organizer Toolkit and use this as a model for how to organize the screening. Contact them if you are interested in screening “Red Cry.”

DONATE to the Lakota Solidarity Project/Truth Tour via PayPal by clicking here.

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“Let’s Talk About…” is an experimental series by POCZP created to share communal knowledge, resources and reflections on a wide range of topics affecting communities of color.

If you are a person of color—or a white person with a history of supporting POC Zine Project— who wants to contribute to “Let’s Talk About…” submit to poczineproject@gmail.com with “Let’s Talk About” in the subject line. 

All submissions to “Let’s Talk About…” will be compiled into a zine (print & digital) that will be released by POCZP in December of 2013.

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

SCENE REPORT [MIDWEST]: Fargo-Moorhead Zine Fest organizing is coming along nicely!

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Fargo-Moorhead Zine Fest was created by POCZP Midwest Coordinator Joyce Hatton. The fest goes down September 7th, 2013.

For more information, visit fargomoorheadzinefest.tumblr.com and “like” facebook.com/FargoMoorheadZineFest.

By Joyce Hatton, POCZP Midwest Coordinator

Exciting news! There will be a screening of the movie “Rez” directed by Dominique DeLeon.  After the screening, there will be a Q&A with members of the crew. “Rez” tells the story of a young Anishinaabe teen who is caring for his younger sister on the Leech Lake reservation in Minnesota. “Rez” was filmed in Cass Lake, MN, and the 17 cast members, 13 of them are from Cass Lake.  For more information, go to specialboyfilms.com.

Also: FMZF has a sponsor!  The Rourke Art Gallery Museum has offered the use of their museum to host community zine workshops.  There will be three per month during June, July and August.  This will be a great way to build up excitement and awareness about FMZF, as well as create many positive opportunities for community building.

This sponsorship from the Rourke is very exciting and gratifying.  I began organizing in January, and this is only the second solid outcome I’ve had as a result of my outreach efforts.  A huge part of organizing is persistence!  At times the lack of response to emails and phone calls was very frustrating.  There were some false starts, opportunities that were unworkable due to time or location constraints, or other unknown issues.

The goal is that FMZF be a diverse event, meaning: people of many different races, ethnicities, cultures, religions, genders, sexuality, and classes have knowledge of the event, feel comfortable attending FMZF, and have had an opportunity to make a zine prior to and/or during the event so that each person feels zines are accessible to them and therefore feel included. It is hard work to make this happen! But it’s worth it!

How can you help?  

  • Consider tabling at FMZF! There is no formal process of applying currently. There will be eventually, most likely in July.  If you think you might be interested and want to get on the radar, or to find out more info, check out fargomoorheadzinefest.tumblr.com or send an email.
  • FMZF needs a logo and a poster. If you might are interested, please email fargomoorheadzinefest at gmail dot com.  FMZF believes all work is worthy of wages, either cash or barter, FYI.  However, this is a labor of love with a small purse, so… don’t quit your day job… ha.
  • Input toward developing a safer space statement would be very helpful. The more input, the better.  Because of a safe space can be so hard to visualize/define/implement, I think it would be helpful to keep language as actionable as possible.  As an example, instead of “respect each other’s boundaries” which leaves a person wondering “well, how do I do that?” a more actionable phrasing is “don’t touch people or their possessions without asking.”  Feel free to email suggestions or tips (again, fargomoorheadzinefest at gmail dot com) or start up a conversation on the Facebook page.

Thanks!

Joyce

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ABOUT FARGO-MOORHEAD ZINE FEST

Fargo-Moorhead Zine Fest activities will include: zine sales, zine trades, zine tutorials, kids activities and speakers.

Event is free and open to the public.  This is a kid-friendly event.  Tabling fee is 15 dollars.  A supporter has offered to pay part or all of the tabling fee for people who are unable to afford it.  Volunteers/co-planners needed.  Amazing swag bags will be your reward! 

Fargo-Moorhead Zine Fest was created with the goal of educating people of all ages about zines. In addition to being just plain awesome to read and make, zines have enormous potential for self-empowerment, raising self-esteem, healthy self-expression, and promoting literacy.

Zines are an inexpensive and easily distributable way to express ideas, showcase art or photography, or invite discussion on a topic. Zines have been around in various forms since the invention of the printing press. FMZF was founded by Joyce Hatton, Midwest Coordinator of the POC Zine Project.

Email fargomoorheadzinefest at gmail dot com for more information.

SAFER SPACE STATEMENT COMING SOON 

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DO YOU WANT TO SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT?

We are looking for representatives in every state, as well as regional  support, as we build toward the National POC Zinester & Ally Conference/Convergence. Ideally you have some experience with organizing events and building community, but experience is not required. All are welcome. Priority will be given to people of color who apply but allies are definitely welcome.

Contact poczineproject@gmail.com for more details with “regional coordinator and internship info” as the subject line.

If you are outside the U.S. and want to be a part of our emerging POCZP Global Ambassadors program, email poczineproject@gmail.com as well to stay informed as opportunities arise.

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh