POC ZINE PROJECT

Posts tagged women of color

POC Zine Project wants to see YOUR #POCZINES Collection

What does your ‪#‎poczines‬ collection look like? Send us a photo of your shelf/drawer/area under your pillow/etc. & we’ll feature it in our ‪#‎izm2013‬ reactions post first week of August.

If you only have two zines created by POC, it’s still a collection - even if you made both of them!  

Deadline: August 28, 2013

PLEASE EMAIL: poczineproject@gmail.com (we are only accepting submissions through email, thanks!)

Please be sure to include the following:

- 1-3 max photos of your #poczines collection (please make sure they are as clear as possible) with photo credit info (the higher resolution the better, thanks!)

- your bio

- any links/contact info you want to share

- info about your own zines that YOU make (optional)

- any of your upcoming/current projects that need some signal boost love. We gotchu boo. 

We know many folks collect zines by authors of diverse backgrounds, so it’s 100% OK/common if you have a mix of POC and non-POC authored zines in your collection. However, for the purposes of this visibility exercise, we only want to see the zines made by POC in your collection (co-authored with non-POC is fine, as long as editor was/is POC).

WHITE FOLKS: Send photos & info about your #poczines collection as well! We wants to see the #poczines on your shelves too.

Please be sure to also include what POC solidarity looks like in your life, both in theory and in practice. 

<3,

POCZP

TESTIMONIAL: F.O.K.U.S. & University of Michigan on POC Zine Project [2012]

Part of our advocacy is making our operations/processes as a long term, grassroots advocacy platform, as transparent as possible. We will be taking more steps to expose internal processes to the public in 2014 and beyond.

Moving forward, we’ll share testimonials we receive on a rolling basis. To kick things off, here is the testimonial we received from F.O.K.U.S., the group responsible for bringing us to the University of Michigan on last year’s Race Riot! tour:

Untitled

F.O.K.U.S. presents

OUTSIDE THE LINES:

A PANEL, DISCUSSION, and ZINE-MAKING WORKSHOP

featuring POC Zine Project

as part of their “Race Riot!” Tour

September 29, 2012

On Saturday, September 29, 2012, F.O.K.U.S. brough the artists and activists behind the POC Zine Project to the University of Michigan campus for a three-pronged event.  The event consisted of:

- A 30-minute interactive art activity with attendees.

In order to access attendees’ creativity at the beginning of the event, guests were provided access to drawing materials and blank sheets of paper on which to add drawings, write prose or poetry, and collaborate with other attendees.  These sheets of paper were clipped to clotheslines criss-crossing along the walls of the room and grouped by theme.  Attendees were asked to clip the papers back up after they were done adding to them.  After thirty minutes the audience was seated and the sheets, filled with collaborative art, were clipped again to the clotheslines.

- A 60-minute panel and discussion with the POC Zine Project panelists. 

This discussion consisted of the POC Zine Project artists and zine-makers explaining their individual approach to zines.  Additionally, they addressed the intersection of race, DIY/punk culture, and inequality in zine culture. 

- A 60-minute mini zine-making workshop facilitate by POC Zine Project artists.

Prior to the workshop, the audience and panelists brainstormed a theme that would drive the zine-making workshop.  During this workshop attendees had the opportunity to learn how to make a zine of their own based on this chosen theme, mixing mediums such as collaging and drawing with prose and poetry.

This event taught FOKUS and event attendees the importance of zines as a tool for self-expression, especially within a multicultural community. 

Zines are self-publications that serve as a political medium to have various viewpoints heard, and frequently are used to express resistance.  With this in mind, student guests could understand zines as a method of making of their voice heard on campus on topics that are either personal or controversial. 

Because of the DIY aspect that was emphasized, attendees could feel the agency zines provide as far as avoiding having their work or expression censored.  Especially in regards to voicing various opinions on topics such as white supremacy, poverty, gender disparities, and other social justice topics affecting present day societies, other forms of publication do not necessarily allow for this same sort of agency.

Many guests to the event had never heard the word “zine” before.  Zines have had little - if any - exposure on University of Michigan campus in recent years.  After the event, guests left with an understanding of the contemporary use of of zines in activism, as well as a new method of accessing their own personal creativity. 

The dynamic and interactive discussion led by the POC Zine Project artists allowed the audience to engage in controversial issues within zine culture, consider a new outlet to express themselves productively on campus, understand networks and resources available to them, and speak with artists with first-hand experience.

——————-

Click here for photos and a recap from our event a the University of Michigan in 2012.

——————-

ABOUT FOKUS

F.O.K.U.S. builds a global community of creativity using the arts. They set out to keep the innovators and visionaries alive, regardless of industry, by awakening the creative mind through art experiences which also reinforce life skills.

F.O.K.U.S. uses the arts to unite, inspire and empower within diverse communities. This is accomplished through the production of events, workshops and the publication of INSIGHT, a quarterly arts magazine.

F.O.K.U.S. highlights the importance of and need for the arts and creativity in life. They believe the arts enable people to rise above barriers in society by creating new paths of communication and ways of thinking.

READ THE MAY 2013 ISSUE OF INSIGHT

https://www.facebook.com/fokus.aa

http://www.fokus.org

http://www.twitter.com/fokus
http://www.youtube.com/fokus
http://blog.fokus.org/

——————-

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

ZINE SPOTLIGHT: Tenacious: Art and Writing from Women in Prison (Issue #27)
RELEASE: December 2012
PAGES: 35
ORIGIN: New York City, USA
EDITOR: Vikki Law
DESCRIPTION FROM VIKKI:

Issue #27 includes:
a colorful Spruce Tree Dryad by a woman incarcerated in Alaska
a letter about ongoing conditions in Denver Women&#8217;s Correctional Facility
how prison staff react to holiday spirit
"It Doesn&#8217;t Matter If It&#8217;s Election Time": a response to Marianne Brown&#8217;s piece by a woman incarcerated in Colorado
letters from CeCe McDonald
mental health care in women&#8217;s prisons
living with HIV in a women&#8217;s prison

HOW TO ORDER TENACIOUS
SNAIL MAIL ONLY (for now)! To get a copy, send $3 in well-concealed cash or a check made out to V. Law to: PO Box 20388 New York, NY 10009
Here is all of Vikki&#8217;s contact info.
Be sure to indicate which issue you want (if not #27 or #28) and (if possible) provide an email address so that Vikki can contact you with any questions/requests.
READ AN EXCERPT FROM TENACIOUS #27 ONLINE
With Vikki&#8217;s permission, POCZP has made it possible for you to read an excerpt from issue #27 online, entitled &#8220;Mental Health Care in Prison&#8221; by Jane Dorotik, along with info about WORTH.

Jane is presently incarcerated in Corona, CA. You can write her at the following address (please tell her you found her info through Tenacious &amp; POC Zine Project):
Jane Dorotik
W90870
California Institution for Women, MB 114L
16756 Chino-Corona Road
Corona, CA 92880
COMMUNITY: Please consider purchasing multiple copies of Tenacious to support the series, Vikki&#8217;s important work helping to empower women who are incarcerated and activism through materiality.
&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;&#8212;-
Q&amp;A WITH VIKKI LAW, EDITOR OF TENACIOUS
By POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano (@dcap)
Recorded on June 16, 2013 at ABC Nio Rio in NYC (part 1 of 4)
FIRST INSTALLMENT: THE MAKING OF TENACIOUS
DANIELA: Tell me about Tenacious issue #27. What is it about, why did you make it and did you have any support through the process?
VIKKI: I’ve been doing Tenacious since 2003&#160;(click here for an interview with Vikki from 2009). It actually wasn’t my idea to start Tenacious, which is a zine of art and writings by and from women in prison about their experiences both in prison and if they continue writing after they get out of prison. It was actually the idea of several women incarcerated in Oregon who were reading zines and magazines written by men in prison , and were seeing that their experiences were not being reflected in men prisoner writings.
They said they weren’t seeing things about dealing with their kids, or child custody issues, or maintaining contact with family, or pervasive sexual harassment they get from staff members inside prisons, so they wanted a publication that spoke about their issues and also spoke to other women so they knew they weren’t suffering these things by themselves.
Being in prison, they didn’t have access to things like stamps, postage - you know - photocopying, access to even the ability to write to other people freely. So they were looking for somebody on the other side and they asked me if I would be the outside person.
DANIELA: How did Tenacious go from an idea to an independent publication/zine?
I just started putting together Tenacious and putting it out. Originally it was me and several other young women who were also interested in supporting women in prison, getting their ideas and voices out. But because zine-making can sometimes be a very solitary experience, and working with people in prison can sometimes be this long extended process in which you don’t feel like you are making much of a difference because you can’t see anything tangible happening, or coming out of it, the other people slowly dropped out &#8230; it is work to sit there and try to figure out how to re-type stuff, or write back and forth with somebody in prison about their piece and how they might possibly make it stronger, because it’s not as well articulated as it could be&#8230;
So right now I am the only person editing Tenacious. And so for the Winter 2012 issue, which is issue #27, I just put out a call for submissions from women in prison - whether it be cisgendered women or transwomen.
DANIELA: How does putting out a call for Tenacious work? How do women in prison find out about this opportunity and how do you collect their stories from the outside?
VIKKI: I put out a call through the network of women in prison I already knew from having done support work in the past. I originally (in the early days of Tenacious) also put out a call through publications that sent free copies to women in prison.
off our backs used to send free copies to women in prison (ceased publishing in 2008). There was also a journal called Sojourner: The Women&#8217;s Forum that closed sometime in the early 2000s that not only sent free copies to women in prison, but also had an actual page or two where women in prison could write in and talk about their experiences. It was the women in prison column. So when they folded, they sent out letters to all of their women in prison readers and said &#8220;we’re really sorry, we’re closing, here are some other alternatives for free publications so you can have something to read and keep up&#8221; and they were willing to list Tenacious as one of the publications you could get free copies of and write for.
Calls for submissions have also been through word of mouth over the years. I’ve seen the people who’ve written for Tenacious shift, and you can kind of trace it to where people are sharing Tenacious in their prisons. So when I first started, I got a lot of writing and art from people incarcerated in Oregon Women’s Prison, because that is where the women were sharing copies of Tenacious.
As they were released, other women who were in other prisons started sharing it. So, for one issue, I might get 50% of my submissions from a women&#8217;s prison in Colorado, and that’s because women get copies and share them around with their friends and are like “hey!”
DANIELA: Tell me a little more about Tenacious #27, which we&#8217;re featuring as a preview in the first installment for our readers. 
Issue #27 is a variety of different writings from women in prison. There’s writings from people in Colorado, Indiana - in there’s a piece by CeCe McDonald, who is an African American transwoman incarcerated in a men’s prison in Minnesota, for defending herself against an attack on the street. There’s a couple of pieces of artwork by a transwoman named Nicky Riley, who has been incarcerated in Texas for several years. There’s a piece on lack of mental health care in California women’s prisons. 
DANIELA: Can you share some info about the history of health care and mental health care in CA? 
Several years ago, people incarcerated in CA actually sued the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR). The Supreme Court actually ruled that the lack of health care in California violated the 8th amendment against cruel and unusual punishment and put the entire prison system under what’s called a federal receivership, in which there’s someone who actually overseas how health care is run. So, basically, CDR can no longer neglect people to the extent that they have&#8230;but that doesn’t mean it’s gotten extraordinarily better, it just means that now there’s some federal oversight. 
So one woman actually writes in issue #27 about how mental health care in prison is still really inadequate, especially since there’s so many people who enter prison with mental health issues.
DANIELA: Do you do &#8220;themed&#8221; issues of Tenacious and how do you convey that information? What&#8217;s your process like?
In my call for submissions, there’s a list of experiences and ideas of what I’m looking for, so it’s not just &#8220;anything you’ve written off the top of your head!&#8221; So, specifically, &#8220;how does this relate to your experience in prison?&#8221;
One of the other goals of Tenacious is not just that women inside are able to read about other peoples’ experiences, but that people on the outside who may never have been incarcerated are able to read about experiences inside women&#8217;s prisons.
When they read, I hope they go &#8220;Wait! I never really thought about the fact that when we vote for or support things like mandatory sentencing laws, or Stop and Frisk, or are against the decriminalization of marijuana, etc. that we’re basically sentencing people to not only lose their liberty but to experience all these other atrocious aspects of prison.&#8221;
DANIELA: We&#8217;ll cover this more in the next installment, but how is your call for submissions for Tenacious #29 going?
For the upcoming issue I’ve actually gotten 4-6 pieces by women incarcerated in the women’s prison in Rhode Island, which I’ve sent one person there copies of Tenacious. Apparently she’s been sharing them around, so now I’m getting pieces from the women in Rhode Island even though I don’t have a prior relationship with any of them.
So, you can kind of trace where people are sharing copies and passing them along as something like “hey you should read this.” Also ,I don’t know if they’re encouraging their friends to write or if the women are reading Tenacious and thinking “you know, it’s not an intimidating thing to write something and send it in.”
COMMUNITY: Stay tuned for three more installments from this interview with Vikki Law that will share more issues of Tenacious.
ABOUT VIKKI LAW
Victoria Law is a writer, photographer, and mother. After a brief stint as a teenage armed robber, she became involved in prisoner support. In 1996, she helped start Books Through Bars-New York City, a group that sends free books to prisoners nationwide. In 2000, she began concentrating on the needs and actions of women in prison, drawing attention to their issues by writing articles and giving public presentations.
Since 2002, she has worked with women incarcerated nationwide to produce Tenacious: Art and Writings from Women in Prison and has facilitated having incarcerated women&#8217;s writings published in larger publications, such as Clamor magazine, the website &#8220;Women and Prison: A Site for Resistance&#8221; and the upcoming anthology Interrupted Lives. In 1995, she became involved with ABC No Rio, a collectively run arts center on New York&#8217;s Lower East Side, serving as Board Treasurer from 1997 to 2002. 
In 1997, she organized a group of activist photographers to transform one of No Rio&#8217;s upstairs tenement apartments into a black-and-white photo darkroom for community use. Since then, she has remained actively involved in coordinating (and sometimes co-teaching) free photography classes for neighborhood youth. In addition, she has participated in and curated numerous exhibitions at No Rio&#8217;s gallery, many with themes addressing social and political issues such as incarceration, grassroots efforts to rebuild New Orleans, Zapatista organizing, police brutality, and squatting. 
In 2003, she collaborated with China Martens to create &#8220;Don&#8217;t Leave Your Friends Behind,&#8221; a workshop addressing the specific (and often unacknowledged) needs of parents and children in radical movements; and has co-facilitated discussions in Baltimore, New York City, Providence, Montreal, Minneapolis, Detroit, and Boston. With Jessica Mills and China Martens, she is compiling a handbook for allies of radical parents by the same name.
VIKKI&#8217;S BOOKS
Vikki is a great example of a woman of color who makes zines and other intersectional materiality. 
Don&#8217;t Leave Your Friends Behind: Concrete Ways to Support Families in Social Justice Movements and Communities (buy here)
Resistance Behind Bars: The Struggles of Incarcerated Women 2nd ed. (buy here)
Som praise for Resistance Behind Bars

"An important contribution to the growing movement to end prisons as we know them."—Michelle Alexander, civil rights lawyer, advocate, legal scholar and author of The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness
"Law’s important book illuminates these under reported stories of individual and collective organizing by women in prison and encourages all of us to work in solidarity across prison walls to create a world that no longer includes the prison industrial complex.”—Angela Y. Davis, author of Abolition Democracy: Beyond Prison, Torture, and Empire and Professor Emerita of History of Consciousness, UC Santa Cruz
"Written in regular English, rather than academese, this is an impressive work of research and reportage."—Mumia Abu-Jamal, political prisoner and author of Live From Death Row

WATCH VIKKI TALK ABOUT GENDER AND THE PRISON INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX

 Watch part 2 of this video here.
——————-
SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT
If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.
DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

ZINE SPOTLIGHT: Tenacious: Art and Writing from Women in Prison (Issue #27)

RELEASE: December 2012

PAGES: 35

ORIGIN: New York City, USA

EDITOR: Vikki Law

DESCRIPTION FROM VIKKI:

Issue #27 includes:

  • a colorful Spruce Tree Dryad by a woman incarcerated in Alaska
  • a letter about ongoing conditions in Denver Women’s Correctional Facility
  • how prison staff react to holiday spirit
  • "It Doesn’t Matter If It’s Election Time": a response to Marianne Brown’s piece by a woman incarcerated in Colorado
  • letters from CeCe McDonald
  • mental health care in women’s prisons
  • living with HIV in a women’s prison

HOW TO ORDER TENACIOUS

SNAIL MAIL ONLY (for now)! To get a copy, send $3 in well-concealed cash or a check made out to V. Law to: 
PO Box 20388 
New York, NY 10009

Here is all of Vikki’s contact info.

Be sure to indicate which issue you want (if not #27 or #28) and (if possible) provide an email address so that Vikki can contact you with any questions/requests.

READ AN EXCERPT FROM TENACIOUS #27 ONLINE

With Vikki’s permission, POCZP has made it possible for you to read an excerpt from issue #27 online, entitled “Mental Health Care in Prison” by Jane Dorotik, along with info about WORTH.

Jane is presently incarcerated in Corona, CA. You can write her at the following address (please tell her you found her info through Tenacious & POC Zine Project):

Jane Dorotik

W90870

California Institution for Women, MB 114L

16756 Chino-Corona Road

Corona, CA 92880

COMMUNITY: Please consider purchasing multiple copies of Tenacious to support the series, Vikki’s important work helping to empower women who are incarcerated and activism through materiality.

————————————————-

Q&A WITH VIKKI LAW, EDITOR OF TENACIOUS

By POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano (@dcap)

Recorded on June 16, 2013 at ABC Nio Rio in NYC (part 1 of 4)

FIRST INSTALLMENT: THE MAKING OF TENACIOUS

DANIELA: Tell me about Tenacious issue #27. What is it about, why did you make it and did you have any support through the process?

VIKKI: I’ve been doing Tenacious since 2003 (click here for an interview with Vikki from 2009). It actually wasn’t my idea to start Tenacious, which is a zine of art and writings by and from women in prison about their experiences both in prison and if they continue writing after they get out of prison. It was actually the idea of several women incarcerated in Oregon who were reading zines and magazines written by men in prison , and were seeing that their experiences were not being reflected in men prisoner writings.

They said they weren’t seeing things about dealing with their kids, or child custody issues, or maintaining contact with family, or pervasive sexual harassment they get from staff members inside prisons, so they wanted a publication that spoke about their issues and also spoke to other women so they knew they weren’t suffering these things by themselves.

Being in prison, they didn’t have access to things like stamps, postage - you know - photocopying, access to even the ability to write to other people freely. So they were looking for somebody on the other side and they asked me if I would be the outside person.

DANIELA: How did Tenacious go from an idea to an independent publication/zine?

I just started putting together Tenacious and putting it out. Originally it was me and several other young women who were also interested in supporting women in prison, getting their ideas and voices out. But because zine-making can sometimes be a very solitary experience, and working with people in prison can sometimes be this long extended process in which you don’t feel like you are making much of a difference because you can’t see anything tangible happening, or coming out of it, the other people slowly dropped out … it is work to sit there and try to figure out how to re-type stuff, or write back and forth with somebody in prison about their piece and how they might possibly make it stronger, because it’s not as well articulated as it could be…

So right now I am the only person editing Tenacious. And so for the Winter 2012 issue, which is issue #27, I just put out a call for submissions from women in prison - whether it be cisgendered women or transwomen.

DANIELA: How does putting out a call for Tenacious work? How do women in prison find out about this opportunity and how do you collect their stories from the outside?

VIKKI: I put out a call through the network of women in prison I already knew from having done support work in the past. I originally (in the early days of Tenacious) also put out a call through publications that sent free copies to women in prison.

off our backs used to send free copies to women in prison (ceased publishing in 2008). There was also a journal called Sojourner: The Women’s Forum that closed sometime in the early 2000s that not only sent free copies to women in prison, but also had an actual page or two where women in prison could write in and talk about their experiences. It was the women in prison column. So when they folded, they sent out letters to all of their women in prison readers and said “we’re really sorry, we’re closing, here are some other alternatives for free publications so you can have something to read and keep up” and they were willing to list Tenacious as one of the publications you could get free copies of and write for.

Calls for submissions have also been through word of mouth over the years. I’ve seen the people who’ve written for Tenacious shift, and you can kind of trace it to where people are sharing Tenacious in their prisons. So when I first started, I got a lot of writing and art from people incarcerated in Oregon Women’s Prison, because that is where the women were sharing copies of Tenacious.

As they were released, other women who were in other prisons started sharing it. So, for one issue, I might get 50% of my submissions from a women’s prison in Colorado, and that’s because women get copies and share them around with their friends and are like “hey!”

DANIELA: Tell me a little more about Tenacious #27, which we’re featuring as a preview in the first installment for our readers. 

Issue #27 is a variety of different writings from women in prison. There’s writings from people in Colorado, Indiana - in there’s a piece by CeCe McDonaldwho is an African American transwoman incarcerated in a men’s prison in Minnesota, for defending herself against an attack on the street. There’s a couple of pieces of artwork by a transwoman named Nicky Riley, who has been incarcerated in Texas for several years. There’s a piece on lack of mental health care in California women’s prisons.

DANIELA: Can you share some info about the history of health care and mental health care in CA? 

Several years ago, people incarcerated in CA actually sued the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR). The Supreme Court actually ruled that the lack of health care in California violated the 8th amendment against cruel and unusual punishment and put the entire prison system under what’s called a federal receivership, in which there’s someone who actually overseas how health care is run. So, basically, CDR can no longer neglect people to the extent that they have…but that doesn’t mean it’s gotten extraordinarily better, it just means that now there’s some federal oversight.

So one woman actually writes in issue #27 about how mental health care in prison is still really inadequate, especially since there’s so many people who enter prison with mental health issues.

DANIELA: Do you do “themed” issues of Tenacious and how do you convey that information? What’s your process like?

In my call for submissions, there’s a list of experiences and ideas of what I’m looking for, so it’s not just “anything you’ve written off the top of your head!” So, specifically, “how does this relate to your experience in prison?”

One of the other goals of Tenacious is not just that women inside are able to read about other peoples’ experiences, but that people on the outside who may never have been incarcerated are able to read about experiences inside women’s prisons.

When they read, I hope they go “Wait! I never really thought about the fact that when we vote for or support things like mandatory sentencing laws, or Stop and Frisk, or are against the decriminalization of marijuana, etc. that we’re basically sentencing people to not only lose their liberty but to experience all these other atrocious aspects of prison.”

DANIELA: We’ll cover this more in the next installment, but how is your call for submissions for Tenacious #29 going?

For the upcoming issue I’ve actually gotten 4-6 pieces by women incarcerated in the women’s prison in Rhode Island, which I’ve sent one person there copies of Tenacious. Apparently she’s been sharing them around, so now I’m getting pieces from the women in Rhode Island even though I don’t have a prior relationship with any of them.

So, you can kind of trace where people are sharing copies and passing them along as something like “hey you should read this.” Also ,I don’t know if they’re encouraging their friends to write or if the women are reading Tenacious and thinking “you know, it’s not an intimidating thing to write something and send it in.”

COMMUNITY: Stay tuned for three more installments from this interview with Vikki Law that will share more issues of Tenacious.

ABOUT VIKKI LAW

Victoria Law is a writer, photographer, and mother. After a brief stint as a teenage armed robber, she became involved in prisoner support. In 1996, she helped start Books Through Bars-New York City, a group that sends free books to prisoners nationwide. In 2000, she began concentrating on the needs and actions of women in prison, drawing attention to their issues by writing articles and giving public presentations.

Since 2002, she has worked with women incarcerated nationwide to produce Tenacious: Art and Writings from Women in Prison and has facilitated having incarcerated women’s writings published in larger publications, such as Clamor magazine, the website “Women and Prison: A Site for Resistance” and the upcoming anthology Interrupted Lives. In 1995, she became involved with ABC No Rio, a collectively run arts center on New York’s Lower East Side, serving as Board Treasurer from 1997 to 2002.

In 1997, she organized a group of activist photographers to transform one of No Rio’s upstairs tenement apartments into a black-and-white photo darkroom for community use. Since then, she has remained actively involved in coordinating (and sometimes co-teaching) free photography classes for neighborhood youth. In addition, she has participated in and curated numerous exhibitions at No Rio’s gallery, many with themes addressing social and political issues such as incarceration, grassroots efforts to rebuild New Orleans, Zapatista organizing, police brutality, and squatting.

In 2003, she collaborated with China Martens to create “Don’t Leave Your Friends Behind,” a workshop addressing the specific (and often unacknowledged) needs of parents and children in radical movements; and has co-facilitated discussions in Baltimore, New York City, Providence, Montreal, Minneapolis, Detroit, and Boston. With Jessica Mills and China Martens, she is compiling a handbook for allies of radical parents by the same name.

VIKKI’S BOOKS

Vikki is a great example of a woman of color who makes zines and other intersectional materiality. 

Don’t Leave Your Friends Behind: Concrete Ways to Support Families in Social Justice Movements and Communities (buy here)

Resistance Behind Bars: The Struggles of Incarcerated Women 2nd ed. (buy here)

Som praise for Resistance Behind Bars

"An important contribution to the growing movement to end prisons as we know them."—Michelle Alexander, civil rights lawyer, advocate, legal scholar and author of The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness

"Law’s important book illuminates these under reported stories of individual and collective organizing by women in prison and encourages all of us to work in solidarity across prison walls to create a world that no longer includes the prison industrial complex.”—Angela Y. Davis, author of Abolition Democracy: Beyond Prison, Torture, and Empire and Professor Emerita of History of Consciousness, UC Santa Cruz

"Written in regular English, rather than academese, this is an impressive work of research and reportage."—Mumia Abu-Jamal, political prisoner and author of Live From Death Row

WATCH VIKKI TALK ABOUT GENDER AND THE PRISON INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX

 Watch part 2 of this video here.

——————-

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

SCENE REPORT: MOONROOT + POC Zine Project session at Allied Media Conference 2013 [Pt 1 of 3]

Allied Media Conference 2013 is from June 20 - 23, 2013. This is POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano’s recap from #AMC2013 on Friday, June 21.

Part of my advocacy—and what has informed POCZP’s focus—is to make information accessible to people of color who might not otherwise have access for a multitude of reasons. That being said, so much happened yesterday that my mind is in a whirl about what to share. I want to help those who can’t be at this year’s conference to feel like they are a part of it—that the information being shared here belongs to them too. I would not be at #AMC2013 if it wasn’t for the support of my co-presenters MOONROOT & Adela C. Licona, so I want to share what’s going on here with the POCZP community.

But how do I condense Day 1 (made up of so many experiences as a first time attendee and presenter) into one Tumblr post? Seems impossible. But instead of continuing to pace anxiously in my hotel room, I will simply share some brief notes, photos and videos from yesterday. I hope that—wherever you are, whoever you are (but especially my people of color)—you enjoy this first recap and tap into some of the excitement, inspiration, beauty and community I experienced at my first day of Allied Media Conference. Enjoy! <3

——-

DAY ONE OF WORKSHOPS AT 2013 ALLIED MEDIA CONFERENCE

Friday was our (POCZP’s) session with our allies/collaborators MOONROOT and professor Adela C. Licona. The name of our session was Zine-making Across the Diaspora.

MOONROOT folks Linda and Sine brought their zine-making materials and zine-making knowledge, as well as their positive, loving energy. If they were nervous, I could not tell. I was nervous but also excited.

SPOTTED: Linda and Sine from MOONROOT zine collective #amc2013 #zines #poczines #detroit

[DESCRIPTION: MOONROOT’s Linda (L) and Sine (R). Sine helped POCZP produce our Baltimore event last year.]

[DESCRIPTION: In this video, folks start to arrive to our session and POCZP Midwest Coordinator Joyce Hatton says hello <3]

We had a spacious & lovely art room to present in at Wayne State University in Detroit. As people began to show up to participate, all my nerves melted away. I felt so affirmed and energized by their presence.

SPOTTED: Hawa from @browntourage presentingvat #amc2013 browntourage.com

[DESCRIPTION: Hawa from @browntourage who is presenting at #amc2013 attended our session: browntourage.com. I look forward to building with them in Oakland late this fall.]

There were 40-50 people in attendance, which felt like such a blessing. There are so many incredible workshops here that overlap so I was excited and surprised when our room was at capacity.

SPOTTED: Texta felt-tip superhero www.textaqueen.com @textaaa #poczines

[DESCRIPTION: TEXTAQUEEN came to our #amc2013 session but this photo is from June 20, 2013, the day before. We are going to collaborate with TEXTA so that they can be a part of this year’s Race Riot! Tour. We just need to raise the funds! <3]

It was a transformative & inspiring experience for me to share information with other people of color who are invested in celebrating the rich history of zines/independent publications by people of color.

SPOTTED: "Zines in Third Space" author Adela and Fargo-Moorhead Zine Fest founder & POCZP Midwest Coordinator Joyce Hatton! #poczines #zines #amc2013

[DESCRIPTION: Adela (L) and POCZP Midwest Coordinator Joyce Hatton (R) at our #AMC2013 session. It was exciting to finally meet Joyce in person after months of communicating/planning via the web and phone!]

Adela explained her “third space” theory with everyone, which you can learn more about in her book “Zines in Third Space.” POC Zine Project is a “third space” too (so am I, as a person/activist)! Adela and I will do a post on “third space” theory after the conference to help explain it all. …Many of you reading this now not only function/thrive in “third spaces” but are also living & breathing examples of “third space” theory.

But yeah—our session! In addition to talking about the history of zines from a POC lens, we had fun making zines!

June 21, 2013: Folks making zines at our #amc2013 #makezines session

Some folks in attendance had never made a zine before and I was honored to be a part of their first experience.  

Folks making zines at our #amc2013 #makezines session on Friday, June 21, 2013 SPOTTED: POCZP founder Daniela & MOONROOT zine collective member Sine before their #amc2013 #makezines session

[DESCRIPTION: Co-presenters POCZP founder Daniela and MOONROOT’s Sine]

Attendees making #zines at our session at #amc2013 #makezines on June 21 2013 Folks making #zines at our #amc2013 #makezines session with MOONROOT and Adela C. LIcona on June 21 2013 Folks making and reading #zines at our #amc2013 #makezines session with MOONROOT and Adela C. Licona

SPOTTED: Gabby Rivera @quirkyrican w her first mini #zine #amc2013 #wemakezines

[DESCRIPTION: Gabby Rivera @quirkyrican smiles at lunchtime with her first mini-zine made at our session]

SPOTTED: Billione shares their mini #zine from our #makezines #amc2013 session with MOONROOT

[DESCRIPTION: Billione shares his mini-zine from our #makezines #amc2013 session with MOONROOT: getbillione.blogspot.com/]

It was also a great learning experience for me to experience condensing the history of zines (with a focus on POC history) into five minutes (I think I did ok)! Due to time constraints, I had to keep it to U.S. zine history but it’s important to note that zine culture is worldwide and that POC make zines about any topic you can think of—worldwide.

POCZP, as part of our Legacy Series, will be sharing more zines by POC from all parts of the world. Stay tune for more on that …

All the #amc2013 #makezines presenters from left to right: Adela C. Licona, Moonroot's Linda, POCZP founder Daniela and Moonroot's Sine

[DESCRIPTION: All the presenters from our session from left to right: Adela C. Licona, MOONROOT’s Linda, POCZP founder Daniela and MOONROOT’s Sine <3]

After my spur-of-the-moment call to action during the zine-making phase (which MOONROOT did a terrific job leading), 10-12 (need to check my bag again) folks who made zines donated them to the POC Zine Project archive!

Some of the mini #zines made at #amc2013 #wemakezines our session w MOONROOT

[DESCRIPTION: Some of the mini-zines folks made at our #AMC2013 #MAKEZINES session with MOONROOT and Adela C. Licona on June 21, 2013]

I will be scanning the mini-zines and sharing them with you all (with permission from the creators) on POCZP’s digital platforms and then mailing back the originals <3

After our session, I took a lunch/connect with allies/friends/resting break and then went to another workshop at #AMC2013 called Designing Games to Understand Complexity.

Spotted: people playing games at the designing games to understand complexity session at #amc2013 on June 21 2013

That experience further inspired me to create a #poczines online game to help people learn more about the rich history of zines/independent publications by people of color from the 1700s - 2000s. More on that later …

After the games workshop, I attended the #AMC2013 opening ceremony, where after an inspiring recap of AMC’s last 15 years was shared, a spontaneous dance party broke out on stage.

People rush the stage to dance at the #amc2013 opening ceremony on June 21, 2013 <3

[DESCRIPTION: #AMC2013 attendees rush the stage to dance at the June 21, 2013 opening ceremony]

It was so beautiful that for many reasons I felt my eyes filling with tears. I hope this gives you somewhat of a sense of what I was seeing and feeling.

Dancing, love and joy at the #amc2013 opening ceremony #detroit on Friday, June 21, 2013 Beautiful crowd surfing at the opening ceremony at #amc2013 #detroit. People of all ages were crowd surfing on stage! Folks workin it out after rushing the stage to dance at opening ceremony #amc2013 #detroit June 21, 2013 POCZP midwest coordinator Joyce Hatton after dancing on stage at #amc2013 #detroit on June 21, 2013 <3

[DESCRIPTION: POCZP Midwest Coordinator Joyce Hatton smiles after dancing on stage at the #AMC2013 opening ceremony on June 21, 2013]

[DESCRIPTION” People dancing at the opening ceremony on June 21, 2013 at #AMC2013. Vine by Ryann Supamakenzi]

Today (Saturday, June 22, 2013) I plan on attending another workshop and getting some free acupuncture (my first experience) and a tarot reading by Jade Fair, who you can see in the photo below. Jade Fair will be joining this year’s Race Riot! tour …

upload

 [DESCRIPTION: Jade Fair holds her first zine SOFT SERVE #1 at #AMC2013 on June 20, 2013. Interview with her coming next week <3]

I hope you enjoyed my first recap from #AMC2013. Let me know what you want to see more of! I will do my best to help make this event as accessible as possible for those who could not attend. You are here with me in spirit and I feel your support and positive energy. <3

Love & Solidarity,

Daniela Capistrano

Founder, POC Zine Project

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ABOUT ALLIED MEDIA CONFERENCE

The Allied Media Conference is a collaborative laboratory of media-based organizing strategies for transforming our world, held every Summer in Detroit.

CREATE

At the AMC, we understand media as any way in which we communicate with the world, from zines to breakdancing, to designing neighborhood-based communications infrastructure. We share and create media that exposes, investigates, heals, builds confidence and radical hope, incites dialogue and debate. We demystify technology, not only learning how to use it, but how to design and build our own.  In doing so, we redefine technology’s role and impact in our lives. The AMC creates learning environments for all ages and skill levels, including hands-on workshops, strategy sessions, presentations and performances.

CONNECT

 The AMC is a network of networks – social justice organizers, community technologists, transformative artists, educators, entrepreneurs, and many others — all using media in innovative ways. Some of these networks sprout from the conference, grow over the course of the year then reconvene in Detroit larger and healthier. Others use the AMC as an annual point of convergence and a space to forge new relationships. Through cycles of participatory investigation and experimentation, our networks continue to grow, generating new theories and practices of media-based organizing.

TRANSFORM

As our networks grow, so does our capacity to take collective actions to transform our world. At the AMC, we develop new leaders and new forms of leadership, design new methods of problem-solving, cultivate the visions of our communities and build our power to make those visions real. 

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

"I’m also really eager to see what People of Color (POC) Zine Project is bringing. They’re based out of the Bronx and do really important work in bringing non-whites to the forefront of zine communities. This is something that AZF Is highly lacking, and I really appreciate their presence this year."—Amanda Mills, co-founder and organizer of Atlanta Zine Fest

Source: clatl.com

Atlanta Zine Fest 2013

POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano will be tabling on behalf of POC Zine Project at the inaugural Atlanta Zine Fest on June 8 and 9. The table will feature a selection of POCZP zine partner titles, as well as some zines, art and jewelry by local ATL zinesters of color. <3

Be sure to stop by the POCZP table to purchase a fresh copy of Mixed Up! A zine about Mixed-Race Queer & Feminist Experience (you can read and download here for free as well), selections from Free Poet’s Press and be sure to get your issue of masConsumption before we run out of copies!

We’ll also have limited edition POCZP buttons for sale/trade! <3

Judith (see her latest call for submissions to Tom Girl zine here), a local POC zinester, will be tabling with POCZP in Atlanta.

Judith Jones is a writer, blogger, zinester and feminist. She contributes to the online magazine Inconnu and she blogs at Simple But Chic. She can be contacted at pigsthatfly.tumblr.com or simplebutchic247@gmail.com.

From Judith:
I will be bringing issue one and two of Tom Girl and artist trading cards. Also, I’ll bringing a few pieces of my dad’s jewelry to sell. It’s handmade. I’m  also bringing various button rings and earrings that I made by myself. 

POCZP will also be joined by Chantelle Kodua, an environmental enthusiast who enjoys working on various DIY projects in her spare time. When she isn’t out saving the world, by digging recyclables out of trash cans, she can be found spending copious hours on tumblr. She can be contacted at chantellephone.tumblr.com.

Daniela is attending Atlanta Zine Fest on behalf of POCZP to connect with the zine community and local zinesters/writers/publishers/artists of color in preparation for the POCZP tour date in Atlanta in October.

POCZP is sharing tabling space with local zinesters of color, as part of our advocacy to make zines by people of color easy to find, distribute and share.

If you are interested in collaborating with POCZP in Atlanta, contact poczineproject@gmail.com. We are especially interested in hearing from artists/zinesters/activists of color and white folks interested supporting POCZP’s efforts.

_____________________

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

airhornoftruthandlove:

I thought I noticed a trend regarding images of people on zine fest posters, so I googled “zine fest poster” and here is what I feel is an accurate sampling of what I saw:
Midwest Zine Fest   Appears to be a white woman.
One of the LA Zine Fest posters.  Appears to be a white woman.
Paper City in Melbourne.  Appears to be a white young woman.
One of the Brooklyn Zine Fest posters.  Appears to be a white woman.
Birmingham Zine Fest  Appears to be a large community of exclusively white people.
Belgium Feminism Fest?  Appears to be women of color represented equally with white women.
I’m not a fan of putting people on posters, for many reasons. It sends unintentional messages that often alienate people.
When a decision is made to use images of people on posters, I appreciate when there are alternate, person-free posters used as well. If I want to support the project by taking a couple of flyers or posters to give to friends, I want to be able to give them one I don’t have to apologize for. And if images of people are used on posters, I do like it when it’s cartoony, rather than representational. The picture here, from Chicago Zine Fest 2011, is adorable. It shows people somewhere with many skin tones, even purple! And all the people in this fanciful place are the same. Whether they are young or old, purple or orange, they have the same love for reading zines! 

Excellent analysis by POCZP Midwest Coordinator Joyce Hatton &lt;3
We&#8217;d love to see more white folks who organize events factor in how representations of people at their events on materiality (physical and in digital form) both welcome and alienate POC.
A facet of white privilege is just assuming everyone is OK with an entire event being represented by a white person on a poster. That is no bueno. If you want more POC to attend your events, make your promotional materials more inclusive.

airhornoftruthandlove:

I thought I noticed a trend regarding images of people on zine fest posters, so I googled “zine fest poster” and here is what I feel is an accurate sampling of what I saw:

Midwest Zine Fest
Appears to be a white woman.

One of the LA Zine Fest posters.
Appears to be a white woman.

Paper City in Melbourne.
Appears to be a white young woman.

One of the Brooklyn Zine Fest posters.
Appears to be a white woman.

Birmingham Zine Fest
Appears to be a large community of exclusively white people.

Belgium Feminism Fest?
Appears to be women of color represented equally with white women.

I’m not a fan of putting people on posters, for many reasons. It sends unintentional messages that often alienate people.

When a decision is made to use images of people on posters, I appreciate when there are alternate, person-free posters used as well. If I want to support the project by taking a couple of flyers or posters to give to friends, I want to be able to give them one I don’t have to apologize for.

And if images of people are used on posters, I do like it when it’s cartoony, rather than representational. The picture here, from Chicago Zine Fest 2011, is adorable. It shows people somewhere with many skin tones, even purple! And all the people in this fanciful place are the same. Whether they are young or old, purple or orange, they have the same love for reading zines!

Excellent analysis by POCZP Midwest Coordinator Joyce Hatton <3

We’d love to see more white folks who organize events factor in how representations of people at their events on materiality (physical and in digital form) both welcome and alienate POC.

A facet of white privilege is just assuming everyone is OK with an entire event being represented by a white person on a poster. That is no bueno. If you want more POC to attend your events, make your promotional materials more inclusive.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: ‘nin,’ a new journal of erotic poetics devoted to exploring sex and the body through language

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: August 1, 2013

RELEASE DATE: September 2013

CONTACT: ninjournal@gmail.com

From nin's Tumblr:

welcome to nin, a journal of erotic poetics devoted to exploring sex and the body through language.

nin is currently accepting submissions for its inaugural issue in september 2013. please click on the SUBMIT tab for instructions on how to send us your work. submissions close august 1.

nin will appear in both print and digital formats. for more information about the journal and the motivations behind it, please click on the ABOUT tab.

check back here often for inspiration of the erotic (and nsfw) kind. nin’s primary goal is not to titillate, but if it is provocative and well written/produced, this is a common side effect. this does not mean that we overlook the raunchy. in fact, it might be our favorite.

finally, nin is run by queers, and is devoted to representing all sexualities, gender expressions and ethnicities in our publication. you are encouraged to submit if you are non-native, gay, lesbian, bisexual, pansexual, queer, genderqueer, transgender and/or a person of color.

we look forward to receiving your work.

COMMUNITY: We encourage people of color of all backgrounds to submit to nin and other publicationsas we need more records of more expressions of sexuality and gender from POC around the world—in OUR voices. xo

COMMUNITY SUBMISSION: Women Who Rock ‘Zine #1 (2013)

image

ZINE NAME: Women Who Rock: Making Scenes, Building Communities

AUTHOR: NA (compilation of POC and ally voices)

RELEASE: February 2013

ORIGIN: Los Angeles, California, USA

DESCRIPTION: Women Who Rock ‘Zine #1 is based on material created for, during, and inspired by the Women Who Rock Conference, which highlights both contemporary and past movements in and outside of Seattle by bringing together musicians, activists, writers, advocates, and scholars to talk about questions of female representation and access for women with music scenes. The first conference was held Feb. 17-18, 2011 in Seattle, Washington.

The ‘zine makes conference material accessible beyond typical academic journals.

READ NOW

As part of our advocacy, POCZP has made this publication available as an embed and free download so you can share as you like <3 Our dear ally Kate Wadkins has an essay you should check out on page 3 under Essays!

MORE INFO ABOUT WOMEN WHO ROCK  http://womenwhorockcommunity.org/

———-

Editor’s Note: A Community Submission post results from POC folk submitting their own zine or zine call to be featured on the POC Zine Project Tumblr and other digital platforms. If you would like to share your zine with the POC Zine Project community, here’s how to do it.

When you submit, feel free to add some background, a description of your work and art and your mission statement. If you just send us the name of your zine, we’ll simply link back to a source for purchasing it and use the language you already have on your site.

As long as the zine was created/co-created by a person of color, we will always share Community Submissions. Enjoy!

POCZP accepts anonymous submissions and zine donations from POC. Click here for submission guidelines.

COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT: Janelle Monáe - Q.U.E.E.N. feat. Erykah Badu

This video, forever. <3 #janellemonae #pleasemakeazine

If Q.U.E.E.N. inspires you to make a zine (so many incredible visual references and symbolism), let us know!

Meet POCZP&#8217;s West Coast Coordinator Liz Mayorga!
Part of POC Zine Project’s advocacy is empowering new and seasoned zinesters of color in the U.S. (and soon worldwide) to share their stories while supporting other POC. Liz is the second official regional coordinator for POCZP (meet Joyce, our Midwest Coordinator, here). We are excited to share developments as this part of our experiment in activism and community through materiality unfolds. 
LIZ, IN HER OWN WORDS
Liz was born in Los Angeles, California, but moved back and forth between Mexico and LA throughout her childhood. She is the youngest of three and the only female in a traditional, Catholic, Mexican-American family. 
Though her brothers taught her how to throw a good punch, she was often confused by the strict gender roles in rural Mexican society, which told her to be passive and meek. Luckily, Los Angeles was a place where contradiction could exist, a place where you could an aggressive girl, and a Mexican Punk. LA and the influence of popular culture gave Liz an identity she could be proud of.
She moved to the Bay Area for school, but ended up falling in love with SF Zine Fest, and community of artists. They pushed her to pursue her passion for Art and Literature. 
Liz now writes fiction and non-fiction, makes comics (check out Inked), and is a working illustrator. Her inspiration comes from her crazy family and Chican@ Pop Culture. She is the Co-Director of San Francisco Zine Fest (SFZF) and is now happy to be a part of the POC Zine Project.
See Liz in action at a recent POCZP Youth Zine workshop in San Francisco, where she led activities with assistance from POCZP intern Itoro Udofia.
Liz hopes to expand and connect the DIY West Coast community and serve as a resource. She wants DIY projects (and zines) by people of color to be especially accessible to youth, because she needed community this open and empowering as a teenager. 
It is also a goal of hers to promote multi-media as a part of zine/DIY culture and expand the limits of what a zine could be, because artists, especially artists with a story to tell, need to be more visible.
Learn more about Liz here: lizmayorga.com
COMMUNITY: Join us in welcoming Liz. We are excited to support zine culture and POC storytelling on the West Coast! We will have several events in this region during the 2013 Race Riot! tour. Stay tuned for details …
DO YOU WANT TO BE A COORDINATOR LIKE LIZ?
If you want to support POCZP with Liz, other coordinators, interns and our touring members, let us know! 
We are also looking for representatives in every state, as well as regional  support, as we build toward the National POC Zinester &amp; Ally Conference/Convergence. Ideally you have some experience with organizing events and building community, but experience is not required. All are welcome. Priority will be given to people of color who apply but allies are definitely welcome.
Contact poczineproject@gmail.com for more details with “regional coordinator” as the subject line.
If you are outside the U.S. and want to be a part of our emerging POCZP Global Ambassadors program, email poczineproject@gmail.com as well to stay informed as opportunities arise.
SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT
If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.
DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

Meet POCZP’s West Coast Coordinator Liz Mayorga!

Part of POC Zine Project’s advocacy is empowering new and seasoned zinesters of color in the U.S. (and soon worldwide) to share their stories while supporting other POC. Liz is the second official regional coordinator for POCZP (meet Joyce, our Midwest Coordinator, here). We are excited to share developments as this part of our experiment in activism and community through materiality unfolds. 

LIZ, IN HER OWN WORDS

Liz was born in Los Angeles, California, but moved back and forth between Mexico and LA throughout her childhood. She is the youngest of three and the only female in a traditional, Catholic, Mexican-American family.

Though her brothers taught her how to throw a good punch, she was often confused by the strict gender roles in rural Mexican society, which told her to be passive and meek. Luckily, Los Angeles was a place where contradiction could exist, a place where you could an aggressive girl, and a Mexican Punk. LA and the influence of popular culture gave Liz an identity she could be proud of.

She moved to the Bay Area for school, but ended up falling in love with SF Zine Fest, and community of artists. They pushed her to pursue her passion for Art and Literature.

Liz now writes fiction and non-fiction, makes comics (check out Inked), and is a working illustrator. Her inspiration comes from her crazy family and Chican@ Pop Culture. She is the Co-Director of San Francisco Zine Fest (SFZF) and is now happy to be a part of the POC Zine Project.

See Liz in action at a recent POCZP Youth Zine workshop in San Francisco, where she led activities with assistance from POCZP intern Itoro Udofia.

Liz hopes to expand and connect the DIY West Coast community and serve as a resource. She wants DIY projects (and zines) by people of color to be especially accessible to youth, because she needed community this open and empowering as a teenager.

It is also a goal of hers to promote multi-media as a part of zine/DIY culture and expand the limits of what a zine could be, because artists, especially artists with a story to tell, need to be more visible.

Learn more about Liz here: lizmayorga.com

COMMUNITY: Join us in welcoming Liz. We are excited to support zine culture and POC storytelling on the West Coast! We will have several events in this region during the 2013 Race Riot! tour. Stay tuned for details …

DO YOU WANT TO BE A COORDINATOR LIKE LIZ?

If you want to support POCZP with Liz, other coordinators, interns and our touring members, let us know!

We are also looking for representatives in every state, as well as regional  support, as we build toward the National POC Zinester & Ally Conference/Convergence. Ideally you have some experience with organizing events and building community, but experience is not required. All are welcome. Priority will be given to people of color who apply but allies are definitely welcome.

Contact poczineproject@gmail.com for more details with “regional coordinator” as the subject line.

If you are outside the U.S. and want to be a part of our emerging POCZP Global Ambassadors program, email poczineproject@gmail.com as well to stay informed as opportunities arise.

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh