POC ZINE PROJECT

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POC Zine Project at Allied Media Conference (Pt 3 of 3]: City Dreams Youth Zine Workshop

Allied Media Conference 2013  was from June 20 - 23, 2013. This is POCZP Midwest Coordinator Joyce Hatton's recap from #AMC2013 on Sunday, June 23. Read the first and second installments by POCZP founder Daniela Capistrano.

CITY DREAMS workshop at AMC2013

 [DESCRIPTION: City Dreams Youth Zine Workshop facilitators and attendees on June 23, 2013 during #AMC2013 in Detroit]

Words and photos by Joyce Hatton, POCZP Midwest Coordinator

The City Dreams Youth Zine Workshop took place Sunday, June 23rd, at the 15th Annual Allied Media Conference in Detroit, MI. The workshop facillitators were Becca Hayes from Michigan State University; Katie Violet Livingston and Casey Miles from Michigan State University and Queer Theory Playground, and Rachel Storm from Outta the Mouths of Babes Youth Radio Project, Urbana-Champaign Independent Media Center, and myself. Another person who was going to co-facilitate decided not to, which none of us had a problem with since five of us was plenty.

Here is the description of the workshop:

Using guided collage-making, youth will envision their cities as dream-cities – full of art, culture, safe homes and strong communities. Youth participants will think through how they could improve their own communities as they create images of what they desire in their cities, neighborhoods, or homes. Collaged images will be assembled into a zine, “City Dreams!,” and copied for all youth participants and distributed in small circulation at the AMC conference.

We had a great time! Five kids attended and three adults. Of the eight, four had never heard of zines before, so there was a nice mix of teaching and sharing of experiences.

We talked about how zines can be a great way to share your art and writings, and also how collaborative zines are a great way to create community. That was a great lesson for me to learn, as I had never made a collaborative zine before.

Before: Prepping For The Workshop

Since we lived in three different cities, we used email to plan the workshop, and we met once we got to AMC to go over some details.

I brought pre-folded pocket zines and instructions on how to fold them- to show that there are different types of zines, and because pocket zines are totally awesome.

But the main reason I brought the pocket zines was to retain what I think is the most powerful moment in a zine workshop: That moment when a person realizes “I can use this to say anything I want… what do I want to say?”

When a zine workshop has a theme, it can take away from the feeling of empowerment, and can make zine-making feel like it’s not something a person can do on their own. I thought that spending a few minutes encouraging kids to make their own pocket zines later might increase the empowerment factor.

During: City Dreams Youth Zine Workshop

It was so much fun! We shared some information about zines, talked about healthy communities, what we liked about the cities that we lived in, and just chit-chatted in general while we worked.

Siuloong: City Dreams zine at AMC2013

[DESCRIPTION: Siuloong did an awesome four page spread for City Dreams zine about what makes great community]

I met some really cool people that day, but I really have a special place in my heart for Amarisa, who is maybe 9 or 10. She talked about how the police in her school make her feel unsafe.

amarisa: City Dreams Zine at AMC2013

[DESCRIPTION: Amarisa’s zine pages about police abusing power, part of the City Dreams zine made at #AMC2013]

I took the opportunity to validate her feelings, and said “That’s really crappy that you feel unsafe in school, and I want you to know that there are people who are working to get the police out of your school, and I hope they do it soon.” And she said “Yes, because that’s where I go to get my education, and I should feel comfortable there, so I can focus on learning!” It was such a rewarding experience for me.

The other kids who were there had made zines before, but Amarisa and her friend Angel had never heard of zines before. When I gave them the pocket zines, they were so excited that they had a medium that they could use to express themselves. I hope they do! Their voices matter!

Jamii: City Dreams zine at AMC2013

[DESCRIPTION: City Dreams zines contributor Jamii did an illustration about backyard gardens: “Sankofa, valuing the earth.”]

I kept a close watch on time to have plenty of time for working on the zine, and so we would have enough time to share at the end of the session. Even so, everyone was working down to the last minute!

Our group was really creative. I let them know that it was OK if they took their zine pages home to finish them rather than have them be included in the zine, because it’s nice to have options. I think everyone submitted all their pages to the zine, though.

After: Lessons From The Workshop

I asked a participant if she identified as disabled, so I could make note in the zine, to give visibility to disabled and differently abled zinesters. As I asked her, I was reminded of my internalized ableism, and very quickly we realized we had a lot we wanted to talk about, so we went out for coffee and had an amazing conversation about a wide range of topics.

We had such a good conversation that I totally lost track of time and did not have time to go make copies of the zine for participants.

In hindsight I realized there wouldn’t have been enough time anyway. One of the areas we had really failed to plan out was how we planned to print out the zine. I was able to get everyone’s address, and once I got back I copied the zine and mailed them. Everyone got two color copies of the zine, and five black and white copies.

City Dreams zine made at AMC2013

[DESCRIPTION: City Dreams zine] 

I was glad I was able to present a workshop at my first AMC. It really contributed to my overall experience.

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LOOKING FOR MORE? 

- POC Zine Project’s workshop recap (with MOONROOT and Adela C. Licona) from the 2013 Allied Media Conference

- Zines in the classroom: Pros and Cons

- Pocket zine-making workshop with an all-Native Girl Scout Troop

- Oasis for Girls zine-making workshop

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SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

Meet POCZP’s Chief Fanalyst for the Legacy Series: Julia B. aka Ju!

Julia B., or Ju: First Official Fanalyst to participate in the POC Zine Project's Legacy Series

NAME: Julia B. (also goes by Ju)

ROLE: Chief Fanalyst for POC Zine Project’s Legacy Series

REGION: East Coast (Brooklyn), USA

COMMUNITY: Ju has been a POCZP member since the beginning. You’ll be seeing more of their contributions manifest on this Tumblr and in other digital and physical spaces very soon …. <3

IN JU’S OWN WORDS

Hi there. I’m Julia B., or Ju (if we’re being informal, which suits me fine), and I’m the first Official (and Chief) Fanalyst to participate in the POC Zine Project’s Legacy Series!

I’m very excited to be part of this series, and I’m looking forward to sharing more about the first Legacy Series selection: Fire!!: A Quarterly Devoted to the Younger Negro Artists, published in 1926. I should probably begin by explaining what my role will be.

fan: As in, amateur. I’m not a professional historian, just an enthusiastic history lover with library access. Whether it’s sci-fi fans swapping self-written stories through the mail, or specialized distros offering up all manner of self-published work at concerts, zine readings and the like, zine culture has consistently been defined by its place outside of the traditional publishing world. Keeping that in mind, the folks writing this series are taking part because we genuinely love the works we’re talking about, and want to share those works as laypeople in an accessible way.

analyst: I’ll be doing a close read and giving background details about the magazine, page by page. Sort of like “Pop-Up Video” but in written form.

Graphic for Ju's Chief Fanalyst bio In lieu of elaborate on-location choreography, I’ll be taking you further into not only the text of Fire!!, but also the world in which it was published—from the author’s contemporaries to the neighborhood in which their office was situated, and more. Ideally, by the time you’re done checking out what I’ve got for you, you’ll have music to listen to, visual artists to check out, books you’ll want to look for. Like I said, I’m enthusiastic about history, and my goal is to make sure that you’re just as thrilled about learning more as I was doing the research.

So why exactly am I so thrilled to be working on Fire!! in particular? Well, as a literature fan, I’ve loved Zora Neale Hurston’s, Langston Hughes’, and Countee Cullen’s writing for years. For many, those names might be the most familiar in the list of contributors to Fire!!, and I’m sure a lot of you out there are already fans of their work. But what of the other contributors alluded to in the “younger negro artists” of the magazine’s title? I see this as a chance for those who are more familiar with the writers in this publication to learn more about the visual artists who contributed, and vice versa, while I take a look at the perspectives that link them all together.

I’m also excited because Fire!! was controversial in its time. The contributors were not interested in perpetuating the politics of respectability. They did not create the magazine to keep in step with the artists of generations before them. In short, they were uncomfortable because they refused to conform to more (Black middle-class) palatable sensibilities.

I mean, check out some of the stuff people were saying when this little magazine out of Harlem made its way into print:

Rean Graves of the Baltimore Afro-American [newspaper] was incensed by the magazine and wrote in his review, “I have just tossed the first issue of Fire!! into the fire.” Benjamin Brawley went so far as to say that if the U.S. Post Office found out about Thurman’s “Cordelia the Crude,” the magazine might be barred from the mail.[1]

Pretty strong reactions to a fledgling publication! The contributors wrote about touchy subjects such as colorism among Black Americans and prostitution. They made deliberate use of Black American vernacular, in an effort to make the voices of their works ring true to the people they represented. And pissed off a bunch of uptight people in the process, even though only one issue of Fire!! was ever published. It’s easy to think of “cutting edge” in the present tense, but in exploring the magazine, we get the chance to check out what the Black American nonconformists of 1926 had to say, and what value those messages hold for us in the present day.

Anyway, enough out of me! I’m looking forward to talking with you further… hopefully we can start a cool conversation (or several) about this classic work. Stay tuned!

[1]: Patton, Venetria K., and Maureen Honey. “The Harlem Renaissance.” Oxford African American Studies Center: Guest Scholars. Oxford University Press. Web. <http://www.oxfordaasc.com/public/featureded/guest_5.jsp>

DO YOU WANT TO BE A FANALYST FOR THE LEGACY SERIES?

The only criteria is that you have to be a person of color! Submit here and tell us a little about yourself. Please include links to some writing samples. Good luck!

White allies: There are other ways for you to support the Legacy Series. Please email daniela@dcapmedia.com for details.

ABOUT THE LEGACY SERIES

Kicking off with FIRE!!, POC Zine Project will make zines by people of color created from the 1700s-1990s available to read and share.

Every Friday (Editor’s note: date pushed to February), you will find a legacy zine by a person of color on poczineproject.tumblr.com. We will share more details in 2013.

WHY WE ARE FOCUSING ON LEGACY ZINES

People of color in the U.S. have produced independent publications (zines) for decades. Many of these zines were political in nature, creating cracks in the lens of white supremacy that shaped (and continues to inform) popular culture and legislation.

These zines were new maps to our liberation, countering the negative propaganda of what people of color looked like, thought and were capable of achieving.

We want the world to know about these legacy zines, so we are going to archive and share them to the best of our ability.

We look forward to partnering with distros, academic spaces, libraries, anti-authoritarian collectives, literary journals, bloggers and more to share the Legacy Series.

“NEW” ZINESTERS: We will still share information about new and upcoming zines by people of color :) Please continue to submit your zines to the archive.

ABOUT THE RACE RIOT! TOUR

POC Zine Project held its first Race Riot! Tour in 2012, producing 20 events in 14 cities, which included speaking engagements at six universities. Click here to view photos from the POC Zine Project: 2012 Race Riot! Tour tour finale at Death By Audio in Brooklyn and access all the tour stop recaps.

We will be taking the Race Riot! Tour through 14 more cities in 2013. Stay tuned!

SUPPORT POC ZINE PROJECT

If everyone in our community gave $1, we would more than meet our fundraising goal for 2013. If you have it to spare, we appreciate your support. All funds go to our 2013 tour, the Legacy Series and the poverty zine series.

DONATE link via PayPal: http://bit.ly/SHdmyh

ZINE SPOTLIGHT: NRN Zine: Mother Earth – Manna-hata – A Native Perspective
This zine (second printing) was created by the Native Resistance Network for a Teach-In they did at the Free University at Madison Square Park in New York City on May Day, 2012.
In this edition, ‘From Resources to Relations’ and ‘Decolonizing Environmentalism’ have been updated.
In solidarity, POC Zine Project has made it possible to read this online without downloading, as well as to share as an embed:

You can also Click here to download a .pdf of the zine. Feel free to print and distribute it.
Native Resistance Network is a direct action organization of Indigenous individuals and Non-Indigenous allies dedicated to informing and educating the public, and supporting and empowering Native peoples throughout the Western Hemisphere and around the world.

ZINE SPOTLIGHT: NRN Zine: Mother Earth – Manna-hata – A Native Perspective

This zine (second printing) was created by the Native Resistance Network for a Teach-In they did at the Free University at Madison Square Park in New York City on May Day, 2012.

In this edition, ‘From Resources to Relations’ and ‘Decolonizing Environmentalism’ have been updated.

In solidarity, POC Zine Project has made it possible to read this online without downloading, as well as to share as an embed:

You can also Click here to download a .pdf of the zine. Feel free to print and distribute it.

Native Resistance Network is a direct action organization of Indigenous individuals and Non-Indigenous allies dedicated to informing and educating the public, and supporting and empowering Native peoples throughout the Western Hemisphere and around the world.

These aren&#8217;t just boxes! Within them are hundreds of poc zines from SlushPilepress!
That&#8217;s right, y&#8217;all! We&#8217;re going to have a wide range of zines made by POC (people of color) on our first tour, kicking off Sept 24 and ending Oct 7!
Xeryle at SlushPilePress is one of several POC Zine Project zine partners for POC Zine Project presents RACE RIOT! Tour.
Here&#8217;s what will be available to you at every tour date, thanks to SlushPilePress:

People of Color Experience OWS - $3 (buy now from People of the Sun Distro)
People of Color Experience OWS 2 - $3 (buy now from People of the Sun Distro)
Occupy The Hood - $5 (we did a spotlight for this issue - part 3 of the Working On It series, which are “antholozines” - download all three for free)
Decolonize! - $5 (buy now from People of the Sun Distro)
Womyn of Color OWS - $5
Womyn of Color OWS 2 - $5
Our Culture, Our Resistance - $5 (buy now from People of the Sun Distro)
Our Culture, Our Resistance Vol 2 - $5 (buy now from People of the Sun Distro)
Anarchist Panther - $3 (buy now from People of the Sun Distro)
APOC Vote 2008 - $5
Occupy Racism/Privilege _$5
Ways to Tokenize/Alienate - $2 (buy now from People of the Sun Distro)
Prices on this announcement reflect tour price only (which go to supporting the costs of this tour). There may be a difference in cost when purchasing elsewhere. Some of these are reprints of older titles and others are brand new! Thanks again, Xeryle!

We&#8217;ll reveal other zine partners and available titles closer to the kick off date &lt;3

These aren’t just boxes! Within them are hundreds of poc zines from SlushPilepress!

That’s right, y’all! We’re going to have a wide range of zines made by POC (people of color) on our first tour, kicking off Sept 24 and ending Oct 7!

Xeryle at SlushPilePress is one of several POC Zine Project zine partners for POC Zine Project presents RACE RIOT! Tour.

Here’s what will be available to you at every tour date, thanks to SlushPilePress:

People of Color Experience OWS - $3 (buy now from People of the Sun Distro)

People of Color Experience OWS 2 - $3 (buy now from People of the Sun Distro)

Occupy The Hood - $5 (we did a spotlight for this issue - part 3 of the Working On It series, which are “antholozines” - download all three for free)

Decolonize! - $5 (buy now from People of the Sun Distro)

Womyn of Color OWS - $5

Womyn of Color OWS 2 - $5

Our Culture, Our Resistance - $5 (buy now from People of the Sun Distro)

Our Culture, Our Resistance Vol 2 - $5 (buy now from People of the Sun Distro)

Anarchist Panther - $3 (buy now from People of the Sun Distro)

APOC Vote 2008 - $5

Occupy Racism/Privilege _$5

Ways to Tokenize/Alienate - $2 (buy now from People of the Sun Distro)

Prices on this announcement reflect tour price only (which go to supporting the costs of this tour). There may be a difference in cost when purchasing elsewhere. Some of these are reprints of older titles and others are brand new! Thanks again, Xeryle!

We’ll reveal other zine partners and available titles closer to the kick off date <3

ZINE SPOTLIGHT: GIRLS GET BUSY #13 featuring Adee Roberson

blackpineappleadee:

On the cover of GGB zine!

girlsgetbusyzine:

Featuring: Adee Roberson, Tim Brooks, Holly Lucas, Debbiecpcks, Bonnie MacAllister, Alina Goldbach, Daisy Parris, Marlena Pope, Beth Siveyer, Svenja Hottler, Rachel Eddie, Mimi Sotudeh, Melissa Polin, Kate*, Elena Carrillo, Julianne Popa, Grace Miceli

Available to buy online here!

Cover art by Adee Roberson

Yay! Go Adee <3

Massachusetts area zinesters and comic artists: come out Sept 15 for a fun event at Papercut Zine Library!

POC Zine Project fundraiser event at Papercut Sept 15 2012

Are you a zinester and or comic artist in/around Massachusetts who wants to support the POC Zine Project tour? Then send some positive energy and support to Anna Mudd, who is organizing a POC Zine Project fundraiser/zine reading/zine swap event at Papercut Zine Library for September 15!

Anna asked us to let everyone know that they are looking for area zinesters and comic artists who would like to read and/or table at the event. If you’re interested and/or have questions, contact Anna directly: anna.mudd AT gmail DOT com.

There will be a Facebook invite and more details available soon, but for now here’s the scoop:

Fundraiser for PoC Zine Project Tour: Reading and Zine swap featuring local zine makers of color (allies welcome!)

Location: Papercut Zine Library (inside Lorem Ipsum Books)

1299 Cambridge St.
Cambridge MA 02134

Time and date: 3-5pm on Sept. 15th

Papercut is a fully-functioning lending library, with a focus on hand-made and independently produced materials. Their collection includes everything from the all-familiar photocopied punk rock zines from the 80’s to hand-crafted personal zines bound together with yarn. Papercut is run by a collective of volunteer librarians. In addition to archiving and maintaining this collection, librarians also host a number of events including zine making workshops and zine release parties.

POC Zine Project is an archive and advocacy platform with a mission to make zines by people of color easy to find, distribute and share - community and activism through materiality. We go on tour Sept 24 - Oct 7 and this fundraiser will help support our efforts.

Big thanks again to Anna Mudd (check out Anna’s zines) and to Alana Kumbier and Rachel Casiano Hernandez for setting this in motion <3 <3 <3

POC Zine Project 2012 tour update: Pittsburgh x2!

Community:

We recently updated our original tour date announcement. To recap, here are the latest changes:

Oct 2    Bloomington, IN (NOT in IL as previously noted)

Oct 4    Pittsburgh, PA (NOT in Blacksburg, VA as previously noted)

That’s right - we’ll be in Pittsburgh on both September 26 (DIY evening show) and October 4 (university event). We will not be in Blacksburg, VA during this first tour.

We will be collaborating with folks in VA on an event to take place sometime next year, so stay tuned for that.

The other tour dates are looking solid so this will (probably) be the last city/date change. We want to be as transparent as possible through this tour planning process.

Thank you for understanding that planning an all volunteer tour of this magnitude is pretty ambitious and we have to adapt (quickly) as factors change <3

We’ll have details for each city in the coming weeks, but until then, here’s how you can help us make this 12 city tour happen:

WAYS YOU CAN HELP NOW

1. CONTACT US and let us know if you’re interested in volunteering, have a band and want to perform, want to table, can help out with hosting us overnight, can assist with livetweeting and livestreaming from events, etc.

2. DONATE to help us offset the cost of this tour, vehicle rental and gas money. We appreciate every cent. POC Zine Project is 100% a volunteer entity.

3. We want folks to table and to sell/trade poc zines at our shows! Very soon we’ll share more details but for now contact us if you’re interested in participating.

4. Do you write for a print or online publication that would like to share information about the tour and event details as they happen? Contact us for interviews or connect us with your friends who do. We want as many folks as possible to find out about this tour and why we feel POC Zine Project is vital to DIY/punk/zine/activism communities.

5. Reblog this post and share the link with your friends!